Jump to content
NS VIA Fan

New 737 MAX 8 Transatlantic Opportunities

Recommended Posts

The introduction of the 737 MAX 8 has opened up opportunities for new transatlantic routes using the smaller long range, narrow body aircraft in smaller markets.

 

Norwegian Air..has service from Europe to smaller US airports for example Stewart/Newburgh NY and Providence RI

 

Here in Atlantic Canada....Air Canada will be using the MAX 8 on routes between Halifax and London Heathrow and between St. Johns, Newfoundland and Heathrow.

 

WestJet has MAX 8s between Halifax and London Gatwick and from Halifax to Paris.

 

Icelandair is also flying the MAX 8 from Halifax to Reykjavik beginning this summer.

 

.....and since the Atlantic crossing is short from here..... WestJet can also use a 737-7 on routes between St. Johns and Dublin and from Halifax to Glasgow.

 

>>>>>>>>>

 

And for the first time ever.....although not on a MAX 8....the French Islands of St. Pierre et Miquelon (near the coast of Newfoundland) will have non-stop transatlantic flights to Paris on a ASL French Airlines 737.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first time I flew across the Atlantic on a 737 was on a 737BBJ used by PrivatAir on a Luftahnsa coded all business class flight from Stuttgart to Newark, several years ago. it was a very nice and classy flight with excellent food and service.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a 737 on these routes would be great--if seat pitch were 35" or better, and the configurations was 2-2. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a 737 on these routes would be great--if seat pitch were 35" or better, and the configurations was 2-2. :P

A 737, or for that matter any narrow body plane with that layout would be better on any route :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Norwegian's transatlantic flights on the MAX are dirt cheap - one way fares start at $80 (for a short time they were as low as $65). Unfortunately, New Yorkers have to fly through Newburgh, and you have to pay extra to pick seats and get dinner, but at those prices, I'd say it's worth it.

Edited by cpotisch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Newburg is tough to get to using public transit, as well. This, in spite of the fact that the Port Authority at one time wanted high speed rail between there and the city.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So when does Southwest start Midway-Gatwick flights?

 

Probably never, as Midway's runway is likely too short to accommodate a fully loaded 737 MAX 8 on takeoff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "circle 22" at MDW is a real doozy of an approach: a steep left bank about a mile out from the end of the runway. BTW, the runway in Brownsville, TX is longer than any of Midway's.

Edited by Palmetto

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

So when does Southwest start Midway-Gatwick flights?

 

Probably never, as Midway's runway is likely too short to accommodate a fully loaded 737 MAX 8 on takeoff.

 

The MAX 8 is effectively the successor to the -700, and Boeing claims that the MAX has significantly better takeoff field performance than the NextGen. Since Southwest already flies dozens of 737-700s to Midway, I don't see why it couldn't handle the MAX 8.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Handling a MAX 8 and handling a max take off weight MAX 8 are two entirely different things. For a trans Atlantic flight it will have to be at close to MTOW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Max 8 is the successor to the 800, Max 7 the 700. A Max 8 could fly in and out of Midway, but not at the highest maximum gross weights. Fully loaded and fueled for long stage lengths Midway would be considered too short for safe ops. The airport planning graphs are available from Boeing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC, the B757 is probably the largest airliner that can use Midway...I don't believe any are currently still flying from there...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Norwegian's transatlantic flights on the MAX are dirt cheap - one way fares start at $80 (for a short time they were as low as $65). Unfortunately...you have to pay extra to pick seats and get dinner, but at those prices, I'd say it's worth it.

Even a free ticket wouldn't be worth it. Norwegian can take their 29-inch knee crushing seat pitch and shove it up their turbofan.

 

 

Pilots tell me that landing at Midway is a “controlled crash!”

Sometimes it's an uncontrolled crash.

 

Southwest_Airlines_Flight_1248_-1.jpg

 

 

IIRC, the B757 is probably the largest airliner that can use Midway...I don't believe any are currently still flying from there...

The 757 as a family has an unusually strong thrust to weight ratio. That being said, each series and model has distinct thrust ratings, min/max gross weights, and initial takeoff performance. These and other variables will factor into minimum required takeoff distance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep...that's why the 757-200 is so popular for flying into Colorado and Wyoming ski area airports. I've flown them into Eagle, Hayden, Montrose, Gunnison, and Jackson... :cool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the days, before the more capable second generation A320s and 737s came out, 757s were the aircraft that were most commonly used to travel to Lhasa Gonggar Airport. It was fun to takeoff from there using most of the looooong runway and then climbing and climbing and climbing and still have peaks on both sides higher than you were! The flight that I took from Lhasa to Kathmandu (China Southern Airline) flew almost directly over Mt. Everest. Of course first it had to climb all the way up to 35,000' or some such before trying to go across the main Himalayan Range. The main range there contains almost half of the world's five mile plus peaks.

 

One neat feature of Lhasa Airport that I remember is that after the door was closed upon completion of boarding, and the engines started, the plane got pressurized on the ground and you suddenly started feeling much better with way more oxygen. Lhasa Airport is at almost 12,000' above MSL.

Edited by jis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 757 had a reputation as one of the best performing airliners for climb out on takeoff while losing an engine. This made it the perfect aircraft for some of those tricky performance locations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Best "hot-rod" since the 727? :)

Used to love to fly in those "three-holer's". It was amazing, watching their wings seemingly disassemble on approach...

I went on a Travel Agent "Fam" trip back in 1973...TWA took us on a 'dinner flight' from Denver - Stapleton to the Grand Canyon and back at sunset....

The Captain deployed those flaps for a nice flight right through the canyon, turned around and did it again the other way, and then took us home....spectacular at sunset!

I'll never forget it... :cool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Captain deployed those flaps for a nice flight right through the [Grand Canyon], turned around and did it again the other way, and then took us home...I'll never forget it...

 

I used to live along one of the flight paths to the Grand Canyon and the routine low flying air traffic was a common and inescapable nuisance. Each and every day, all day long. As a little boy I grew up in a forest that was almost as noisy as an airport. Which is kind of absurd and appalling when you think about it, although I doubt anybody on any of those aircraft ever did.

Edited by Devil's Advocate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The Captain deployed those flaps for a nice flight right through the [Grand Canyon], turned around and did it again the other way, and then took us home...I'll never forget it...

 

I used to live along one of the flight paths to the Grand Canyon and the routine low flying air traffic was a common and inescapable nuisance. Each and every day, all day long. As a little boy I grew up in a forest that was almost as noisy as an airport. Which is kind of absurd and appalling when you think about it, although I doubt anybody on any of those aircraft ever did.

 

I imagine, if you didn't suffer from that effect, you might have enjoyed it too... ;)

But I am sorry you were bothered by those flights...the early 7-2's were very noisy, as were all early jet airliner's.

I live under the "Expressway Visual Approach" to LGA's Runway 31, and am used to aircraft noise...especially when they take off from 13. In the early turbojet era, they used to rattle my windows, and set off car alarm's. Worse in the summer, until we finally got air-conditioning. The new high-bypass fanjets are much quieter. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Norwegian's transatlantic flights on the MAX are dirt cheap - one way fares start at $80 (for a short time they were as low as $65). Unfortunately...you have to pay extra to pick seats and get dinner, but at those prices, I'd say it's worth it.

Even a free ticket wouldn't be worth it. Norwegian can take their 29-inch knee crushing seat pitch and shove it up their turbofan.

Several months ago, my 6'2" Physics teacher took a Norwegian 737 MAX to Ireland and said there was plenty of space. It obviously wasn't as open and airy as a wide body, but was perfectly comfortable for a 7 hour flight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I imagine, if you didn't suffer from that effect, you might have enjoyed it too... ;) But I am sorry you were bothered by those flights...the early 7-2's were very noisy, as were all early jet airliner's. I live under the "Expressway Visual Approach" to LGA's Runway 31, and am used to aircraft noise...especially when they take off from 13. In the early turbojet era, they used to rattle my windows, and set off car alarm's. Worse in the summer, until we finally got air-conditioning. The new high-bypass fanjets are much quieter.

Thank you for your understanding. I personally don't mind aircraft sounds when I'm in a major city near an actual airport, even when it's one of AA's notorious Mad Dog 80's, but when I'm out in the woods I just want some peace and quiet. A brief encounter with a low flying aircraft once in blue moon is fine, but all day long every single day is a bit much.

 

 

 

 

Norwegian's transatlantic flights on the MAX are dirt cheap - one way fares start at $80 (for a short time they were as low as $65). Unfortunately...you have to pay extra to pick seats and get dinner, but at those prices, I'd say it's worth it.

Even a free ticket wouldn't be worth it. Norwegian can take their 29-inch knee crushing seat pitch and shove it up their turbofan.

 

Several months ago, my 6'2" Physics teacher took a Norwegian 737 MAX to Ireland and said there was plenty of space. It obviously wasn't as open and airy as a wide body, but was perfectly comfortable for a 7 hour flight.

 

I'm over six feet myself and I've found 29-inch pitch to be completely impractical. It's also extremely uncomfortable and medically risky. My knees and legs suffer pain and eventually go numb when shoved into anything less than 32 or 33 inch pitch depending on the length of the trip and the design of the seat. With 34" pitch and above and I'm fine indefinitely. I suppose it's possible your teacher lucked into a row that had more pitch than the minimum and/or was aligned differently than the others, but for someone of my height risking a long ride with extremely tight legroom is simply not worth it at any cost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm over six feet myself and I've found 29-inch pitch to be completely impractical. It's also extremely uncomfortable and medically risky. My knees and legs suffer pain and eventually go numb when shoved into anything less than 32 or 33 inch pitch depending on the length of the trip and the design of the seat. With 34" pitch and above and I'm fine indefinitely. I suppose it's possible your teacher lucked into a row that had more pitch than the minimum and/or was aligned differently than the others, but for someone of my height risking a long ride with extremely tight legroom is simply not worth it at any cost.

 

Have you flown on the Norwegian MAX yet?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×