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Richard Anderson replacing Wick Moorman as Amtrak CEO

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His Vice President is someone who spent time on Capitol Hill. And knows how congress works. Honestly I think the Vice President is far worse than Anderson. Which is why both need to go.

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His Vice President is someone who spent time on Capitol Hill. And knows how congress works. Honestly I think the Vice President is far worse than Anderson. Which is why both need to go.

 

He also had a hand in crafting PRIIA.

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His Vice President is someone who spent time on Capitol Hill. And knows how congress works. Honestly I think the Vice President is far worse than Anderson. Which is why both need to go.

He also had a hand in crafting PRIIA.

Do you really want to give me more reasons to not like him?

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It's clear hiring an airline CEO as head of Amtrak was a disastrous decision.

The whole board needs to resign, too, as they fully support this wrongheaded CEO's irrational plans to destroy the national system.

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At this point, I'd like to tip my hat to Mr. Anderson.

 

While Mr. Boardman was the first CEO during my tenure to make sure that various departments realized they worked for a passenger railroad, which means we should work together to support customer services, Mr. Anderson is the first CEO during my tenure to notify the mechanical department that they are FRONT LINE EMPLOYEES! :)

 

That's right and all though it will take time, this is more than words...I've seen the action.

 

He informed mechanical that the customer experience begins with them. If the train is dirty, looks neglected and has burnt out light bulbs, the rest of the employees are already on the defense. While he is aware that some of the equipment is just old, rundown and neglected, he wants the things that can be controlled...controlled...and is not taking no for an answer...regardless of the consequences (and there are definitely going to be consequences particularly when it comes to washing the trains.)

 

To that end, he is investing in the mechanical departments. He is investing in training and upgrades in facilities. Granted, he could do a lot more, but we'll have to cut loose some more chefs to make it happen.....(too soon?)

 

Additionally, there is a contractor that was hired to check the conditions of the trains prior to departure. In other words, the group is traveling around the various terminals, inspecting the work of the mechanical facilities. We've been told to assist when we seen them (give them access to the trains , escort them across tracks ,etc). They are also on the look out for items that haven't been repaired in a timely fashion. It has been made clear that facilities with too many exceptions will experience "changes" :ph34r:.

 

It is a start.

 

 

Am not so sure about this.

Amtrak mechanical has really fallen.

It's routinely placing malfunctioning cars in service, a big no-no for a business that wants to please its customers.

 

Detailed in this post

http://discuss.amtraktrains.com/index.php?/topic/73558-bad-amtrak-customer-service-and-maintenance-disastrous-calif-zephyr-trip/

Edited by ohle

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At this point, I'd like to tip my hat to Mr. Anderson.

 

While Mr. Boardman was the first CEO during my tenure to make sure that various departments realized they worked for a passenger railroad, which means we should work together to support customer services, Mr. Anderson is the first CEO during my tenure to notify the mechanical department that they are FRONT LINE EMPLOYEES! :)

 

That's right and all though it will take time, this is more than words...I've seen the action.

 

He informed mechanical that the customer experience begins with them. If the train is dirty, looks neglected and has burnt out light bulbs, the rest of the employees are already on the defense. While he is aware that some of the equipment is just old, rundown and neglected, he wants the things that can be controlled...controlled...and is not taking no for an answer...regardless of the consequences (and there are definitely going to be consequences particularly when it comes to washing the trains.)

 

To that end, he is investing in the mechanical departments. He is investing in training and upgrades in facilities. Granted, he could do a lot more, but we'll have to cut loose some more chefs to make it happen.....(too soon?)

 

Additionally, there is a contractor that was hired to check the conditions of the trains prior to departure. In other words, the group is traveling around the various terminals, inspecting the work of the mechanical facilities. We've been told to assist when we seen them (give them access to the trains , escort them across tracks ,etc). They are also on the look out for items that haven't been repaired in a timely fashion. It has been made clear that facilities with too many exceptions will experience "changes" :ph34r:.

 

It is a start.

 

 

Amtrak mechanical has really fallen.

It's routinely placing malfunctioning cars in service, a big no-no for a business that wants to please its customers.

 

Amtrak's quality control is getting really bad. The sleeping car me and my elderly mother rode in on the California Zephyr this month had no AC. The crew said it had been like this for a week, meaning the car has been routinely running when it shouldn't have.
Maintenance in CHI didn't fix it, and didn't replace it with a working unit. This made a lot of passengers angry with summer temps in the 90s on the California Zephyr. Many said "Never again..."
I called Amtrak customer service en-route (the first day, of 2 nights) to see if the car could be repaired at Salt Lake City or Denver, the next major service stops. Nope. Nothing to be done.
The crew recommended sleeping in coach or in the lounge, which weren't acceptable solutions. The train was sold-out, so there weren't any rooms available.
The family room in our car was evacuated, so me and a gentleman across the aisle took those big beds (per directions of our attendant). It was a little cooler, and better than the other rooms, which were infernos. The 2nd night, at 1 a.m., the conductor moved us to a roommette in the crew car at Holdredge, NE, which was air conditioned. But a 1 a.m. transfer wasn't convenient.
A large group of America by Rail travelers boarded at Glenwood Springs. They were very upset at the heat. One was looking into an overnight bus from Denver or renting cars, none of which were practical, so they remained aboard.
The crew (and I) recommended contacting customer service for refunds. We got a $500 voucher, which seemed fair.
There was no rational reason the defective sleeping car should remain in service. This points to Amtrak's lousy customer service and maintenance. Things like this shouldn't happen, particularly at the peak of summer travel.

 

Why'd you post all of this in a new thread and in this one?

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Anderson's actions show he knows little about travel in general, and next to nothing about train travel.

His firing is long overdue.

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I was at a local Cheesesteak place this evening after work.. (Shocking... Steve eating a cheesesteak :lol:) After I placed my order I saw a gentlemen wearing a blue shirt and Amtrak Epaulettes. I asked him how long he's been at Amtrak and where he works etc. We had a nice conversation. I asked him what he thought of Richard Anderson and what the morale is like amongst the crew base he works in.. Which was NOT Philly. He told me about the stuff we already know about Food on the LSL and CL. The ongoing saga of the diners. He actually complained about the Acela Express First Class Assigned Seating Pilot. He did agree with the widely popular opinion that he's trying to make Amtrak an Airline. I'll say in his defense he said it on his own and without being persuaded etc.

 

I think that it's sad that your own employees have nothing nice to say about you and the way your running the company you're in charge of. While I can tell you first hand that, it's just a way of life on the RR to complain about bosses.. Talking about Richard Anderson with this gentlemen he seemed genuinely concerned about Amtrak's future and the current leadership. IMO, that's not good.. Your employees shouldn't have to worry about things like that.

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I've talked to dining car crews and SCAs. They all seem demoralized. Some are somewhat outspoken, but most seem resigned to the fact there is little they can do. Many have said in so many words that they can't let this situation dictate the quality of their work; that their first obligation is to do a good job. A few have smiled as if to say "Yes things are bad, but I don't think I should [or want] to discuss it." They all seem pleased that I am aware, and disapproving of what's taking place.

 

Anderson, even on this site, still has his fans. What are you cheering about? Canceling the Toys for Tots Train? The "improved" timekeeping that has gotten worse? The incorrect usage of the beautiful new Viewliner diners? The false reporting and accounting tactics [as reported by Trains Magazine] to split up the Southwest Chief? His refusal to grant interviews with the media? His alienating private car owners and their revenue, without benefit of improved timekeeping?

 

He's had enough time. He's put his cards on the table and doesn't want to remotely discuss it. He needs to go !

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Anderson, even on this site, still has his fans. What are you cheering about? Canceling the Toys for Tots Train? The "improved" timekeeping that has gotten worse? The incorrect usage of the beautiful new Viewliner diners? The false reporting and accounting tactics [as reported by Trains Magazine] to split up the Southwest Chief? His refusal to grant interviews with the media? His alienating private car owners and their revenue, without benefit of improved timekeeping?

I simply do not use Amtrak enough to be any kind of expert, as my use since '12 has been an Auto-Train "voyage" each year.

 

But reviewing the mature, yet pointed, comments captioned, shows they are all addressing "experiential" concerns and ancillary lines of business.

 

To the Board, and their "benefactors" with record levels of support, their "hired hand" is attempting to give them an outfit that provides passenger transportation in a safe, efficient, manner concentrating on markets where there is sufficient or potential demand for such, as does the outfit from which he was recruited.

 

The issues noted above, along with those noted in many pages at sites such as this, are by and large addressing a line of business that was obsolescent after the Korean War, and obsolete by A-Day.

Edited by GBNorman

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Anderson, even on this site, still has his fans. What are you cheering about? Canceling the Toys for Tots Train? The "improved" timekeeping that has gotten worse? The incorrect usage of the beautiful new Viewliner diners? The false reporting and accounting tactics [as reported by Trains Magazine] to split up the Southwest Chief? His refusal to grant interviews with the media? His alienating private car owners and their revenue, without benefit of improved timekeeping?

I simply do not use Amtrak enough to be any kind of expert, as my use since '12 has been an Auto-Train "voyage" each year.

 

But reviewing the mature, yet pointed, comments captioned, shows they are all addressing "experiential" concerns and ancillary lines of business.

 

To the Board, and their "benefactors" with record levels of support, their "hired hand" is attempting to give them an outfit that provides passenger transportation in a safe, efficient, manner concentrating on markets where there is sufficient or potential demand for such, as does the outfit from which he was recruited.

 

The issues noted above, along with those noted in many pages at sites such as this, are by and large addressing a line of business that was obsolescent after the Korean War, and obsolete by A-Day.

Punctual timekeeping, honest accounting, and transparency with the public are not “ancillary lines of business,” let alone “obsolescent.”

You’re welcome to share your opinions, but please don’t misconstrue others’ opinions for you to trample over them with yours.

This forum is not made of straw. :)

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Anderson, even on this site, still has his fans. What are you cheering about? Canceling the Toys for Tots Train? The "improved" timekeeping that has gotten worse? The incorrect usage of the beautiful new Viewliner diners? The false reporting and accounting tactics [as reported by Trains Magazine] to split up the Southwest Chief? His refusal to grant interviews with the media? His alienating private car owners and their revenue, without benefit of improved timekeeping?

I simply do not use Amtrak enough to be any kind of expert, as my use since '12 has been an Auto-Train "voyage" each year.

 

But reviewing the mature, yet pointed, comments captioned, shows they are all addressing "experiential" concerns and ancillary lines of business.

 

To the Board, and their "benefactors" with record levels of support, their "hired hand" is attempting to give them an outfit that provides passenger transportation in a safe, efficient, manner concentrating on markets where there is sufficient or potential demand for such, as does the outfit from which he was recruited.

 

The issues noted above, along with those noted in many pages at sites such as this, are by and large addressing a line of business that was obsolescent after the Korean War, and obsolete by A-Day.

Punctual timekeeping, honest accounting, and transparency with the public are not “ancillary lines of business,” let alone “obsolescent.”

You’re welcome to share your opinions, but please don’t misconstrue others’ opinions for you to trample over them with yours.

This forum is not made of straw. :)

 

 

Amen.

So much for this dismissive attitude that "nobody" rides the trains outside the lightly-used, less occupancy (and more highly subsidized) corridors and big cities, which could care less about those in "flyover" country.

 

As the law states, that's THE LAW, "Amtrak shall operate a NATIONAL network...."

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As the law states, that's THE LAW, "Amtrak shall operate a NATIONAL network...."

Where is there any reference to that Amtrak shall operate an INTERCONNECTED network.

 

Amtrak operates short distance "corridors" on both Coasts and in between, which to those who hold "it's time" for the Adios drumheads, the National system erm requirement has been met.

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Just because you, in your narrow, parochial and limited view, don't see any value in the LD trains doesn't mean that holds true for most.

The long-distance trains, like Amtrak's other divisions, are experiencing record ridership in the last five years, the highest ever.

Which means more people than ever are riding the national system trains.

 

This is something that should be expanded, not decimated.

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Just because you, in your narrow, parochial and limited view, don't see any value in the LD trains doesn't mean that holds true for most.

The long-distance trains, like Amtrak's other divisions, are experiencing record ridership in the last five years, the highest ever.

Which means more people than ever are riding the national system trains.

 

This is something that should be expanded, not decimated.

This is an ingenuous argument. Record ridership means the LD trains are at what .1% of the traveling public? There issue with the LD trains is that there always will be ceiling to a mode that is days slower than flying and many hours slower than driving. So Amtrak has to look at if serving that .1% is the best use of it's limited resources.

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As the law states, that's THE LAW, "Amtrak shall operate a NATIONAL network...."

Where is there any reference to that Amtrak shall operate an INTERCONNECTED network.

 

Amtrak operates short distance "corridors" on both Coasts and in between, which to those who hold "it's time" for the Adios drumheads, the National system erm requirement has been met.

The definition of a network implies interconnectivity. If the the systems on the coasts as well as the Midwest system were no longer connected by LD trains, there would then be three separate networks. However, although I would interpret the law to mean a network of trains, Amtrak leadership could attempt to exploit a legal loophole by connecting the corridor trains with thruway busses or even thru-ticketing via a separate bus company such as Greyhound. Fortunately, I doubt that politicians would allow the disintegration of the LD network, at least for now.

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This is something that should be expanded, not decimated.

If, as was the case when Amtrak first started, the Class I industry had ample capacity to "run 'em on time" and to handle the proliferation of new routes, then that would be one thing.

 

But that capacity to contemplate new routes and/or frequencies is simply not there. The studies mandated under RSIA/PRIIA08 established that there would need be considerable capacity expansion in order to accommodate, say, a Daily Sunset. That track capacity would be out of the public through, and the cost of such directly assignable to the route benefitted.

 

Further, Amtrak already accesses the Class I's at reportedly "bargain basement" rates (actual rates are protected from FOIA). It is very safe assumption those are hardly sufficient to cover the opportunity cost, i.e. what could be made with one additional Container train handled.

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Amtrak can serve both easily. The long distance trains should be the skeleton for corridors. Getting rid of the LD trains isnt a panacea for breaking even. All said the same subsidy will be required for less service if they do go away. Fixed costs are fixed, the savings would be negligible. Long distance trains are the cherry on top for next to nothing if costs were correctly reported.

 

For those still advocating for Anderson and his agenda/ corridors. Remember under current mandates Amtrak cant operate corridors under 750 miles only states can. So the whole things a farce. Just one more way the Trump administration through Mulveney, Chou, and ultimately Anderson are passing the buck to the States.

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Just a reminder that Anderson was appointed by an Obama appointed Board. Trump has nothing to do with that part, no matter how much many of us wish he did.

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I just can't fathom why anyone is supporting this current Amtrak administration. They've done nothing but harm Amtrak's brand awareness among multiple groups. There are ways to run a business without harming the brand. The best ever "The Toys for tots trains not meet the core business." It's a train delivering toys for needy low income kids. Of course it doesn't meet the core business. It never did, and never will. I'm half tempted to throw two private cars on the Adirondack the day it was supposed to run and do the tots train myself.

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If you really believe they will allow that I have some prime oceanfront property to sell you in Nevada. It will be oceanfront just any day now

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