Jump to content

Recommended Posts

The previous paint scheme (red white and blue stripe) was similar to the old Pepsi can logo.

 

For context:

 

9604517990_d18fc8a1a1_b.jpg

Edited by chrsjrcj

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every once in a while you can catch one doing "road" duty also. I had one as a second unit on the Crescent last year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The previous paint scheme (red white and blue stripe) was similar to the old Pepsi can logo.

 

For context:

 

9604517990_d18fc8a1a1_b.jpg

 

 

Ah,,,, something that simple.... Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There seems to be one regularly assigned to the Coast Starlight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been pulled by quite a few of these engines. But mostly when being added on and off trains. However on the road I've seen one lead the Empire Builder before in Seattle east.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I’ve heard, these engines are dog slow in revenue passenger service. These have 12 cylinders making 3200 hp, minus parasitic loss for HEP which can put it down as low as 2100 or 2200 available for traction. I guess routing that remaining horsepower through DC traction motors is the big difference from the P32ACDM, which I have not heard bad things about and is seemingly able to accelerate to 110 with a train fairly quickly from my experiences on the Empire corridor. Do the Dash 8s also load slower or something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, are these P32-8WH's HEP enabled? Or is there always a P40 - P42DC needed on the consist for HEP?

They do. The P32-8BWH is basically just a freight loco with HEP added for passenger use.

Edited by cpotisch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In locomotive model designation's, the letter 'P' somewhere, is usually an indication that a locomotive is equipped for passenger train support...in the steam heat era, it had a steam generator, in the HEP era, either a separate HEP engine generator, or a means of tapping the main engine for HEP....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In locomotive model designation's, the letter 'P' somewhere, is usually an indication that a locomotive is equipped for passenger train support...in the steam heat era, it had a steam generator, in the HEP era, either a separate HEP engine generator, or a means of tapping the main engine for HEP....

 

Ah, just like "F40PHn" F (body style) 40 P(Passenger) H(HEP) and then n "2/2D/3" etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In locomotive model designation's, the letter 'P' somewhere, is usually an indication that a locomotive is equipped for passenger train support...in the steam heat era, it had a steam generator, in the HEP era, either a separate HEP engine generator, or a means of tapping the main engine for HEP....

 

The "pepsi can" locomotives however can get difficult tho... as they have a couple different names. GE calls them either Dash 8-32BWH or B32-8WH, Amtrak calls them P32-8, and some folks call the P32-8WH. Personally I prefer the call them via the GE name, B32-8WH as it keeps confusion down with the P32-ACDM.

 

peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Story has it that when General Electric had production issues with the P-40 engines, they persuaded Amtrak to accept modified freight engines to "tide 'em over".

 

As a goodwill gesture, GE agreed to livery the P-32's anyway Amtrak wanted 'em for no additional cost over a "basic Black".

 

The Pepsi Can, a railfan or maybe a craft employee name, is what came to pass.

 

Just a story AFAIC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of food-related names have made it into the Amtrak lexicon. The AEM-7 electric locomotives that were used on the NEC were known, alternately, as “Swedish Meatballs” or “Toasters”.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of food-related names have made it into the Amtrak lexicon. The AEM-7 electric locomotives that were used on the NEC were known, alternately, as “Swedish Meatballs” or “Toasters”.

 

I believe "Sweedish Meatballs" is a more generic term for the locomotive itself... Bioth SEPTA and NJ Transit used them extensively. NJ Transit called them (officially) ALP-44 units. They were manufactured by ABB Traction, a subsidiary of the ABB Group... a Sweedish and Swiss conglomerate co. I think it was the Sweedish part of the conglomerate (Aesa) that made them. Hence, "Sweedish Meatballs."

 

NJ_Transit_ABB_ALP-44M_4430.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought I had a close-up picture of the "Pepsi Can" on the California Zephyr in May 1994, but it turns out my close-up is of the lead unit, which I thought was more exciting. But I found this shot, which is also interesting because of the express cars:

 

post-12801-0-28001100-1539730518_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×