How to measure rail distances?

Discussion in 'Freight, International and Other Rail' started by v v, May 30, 2019.

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  1. May 30, 2019 #1

    v v

    v

    v v

    Conductor AU Supporter

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    For the US LD trains it is of course simple to look up the schedule, but how about the rest of the world?

    Is there a known source of rail distances or just slog through with google maps or similar to put a rail journey together piece by piece.

    Also have come across an area in China that is a disputed zone and no data is possible for that area although passenger trains run through it (but you are not allowed to get off the train in that zone).

    Any ideas to simplify an extra long distance rail journey measurement gratefully received.

    Thanks
     
  2. May 30, 2019 #2

    caravanman

    caravanman

    caravanman

    Conductor

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    Hi Jamie,
    Would it be any help to refer to the timetables instead of the distances? I have to be careful when plotting my Indian trips, and usually use the number of hours on a train as a guide, rather than the absolute mileage.
    Seat 61, I am sure you know of, has some "main" tourist route guidance, e.g.: https://www.seat61.com/China.htm

    Ed.
     
  3. May 30, 2019 #3

    v v

    v

    v v

    Conductor AU Supporter

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    Thanks Ed, but I like to know what sort of distance we may travel on the longer journeys just due to plain curiosity.

    This is what happened to us yesterday re schedules.

    Yesterday we returned from Beziers, France to Moulins sur Allier our nearest rail station in France. The journey was made up of 3 trains and the longest section of the journey, the oldest train and most pleasant ride of the three had a problem with the onboard toilets, they couldn't be used. The schedule went to pot as the conductor walked through the train (2 cars) to explain the situation to each person onboard and to say if someone needed to use a toilet to let him know and the train would stop longer or be stopped at a manned station to allow passengers to avail themselves (the journey is through one of the remotest and most beautiful areas of France but where most small stations no longer function). It delayed the train a fair amount and as the line is through twisty mountain terrain they couldn't make up the time very easily so the timetable went out of the window.

    Part of that line will be closed for maintenance next month and may never re-open, but the most remote and most scenic section (about 4 1/2 hours) will continue to be used as small communities and a large rolling mill are dependant on it.
     
    Bob Dylan likes this.

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