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MoMoJones618

How to become a passenger train conductor?

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I've been looking everywhere to find out where to go to become a passenger conductor and I'm constantly given the run around. Where do I go to apply for passenger train conductor training

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Ok thanks... unfortunately my state isn't hiring... I'll keep looking

You might have to settle for "other" locations until you gain seniority. Doing so, at least you would have "your foot in the door".

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Ok thanks... unfortunately my state isn't hiring... I'll keep looking

You might have to settle for "other" locations until you gain seniority. Doing so, at least you would have "your foot in the door".

 

Good point. I don't think it is reasonable to target an entry level job on any Amtrak route that is entirely within your home state.

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Yeah, I have a question for the OP - if becoming a conductor would require you to move around a lot and leave your home state often, would you be willing to do it?

Edited by cpotisch

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The snack car attendant on my last trip on the CZ lived a few miles from my home in Pittsburgh. He worked mainly the western LD trains. He said he would just hop on Amtrak to get to where he was working. Unfortunately he was not paid for travel time to work. ;)

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Ok thanks... unfortunately my state isn't hiring... I'll keep looking

 

Amtrak has just started a new Fiscal Year. So hiring may ramp up. If you have any questions feel free to PM me.

 

 

Ok thanks... unfortunately my state isn't hiring... I'll keep looking

You might have to settle for "other" locations until you gain seniority. Doing so, at least you would have "your foot in the door".

 

 

While I understand what you're saying. Let's just say I interview for a job in Reno, NV and I live in Chicago. Unless you're seriously qualified for the job the chances they hire you aren't entirely in your favor. They're looking for people to work in Reno. They're fear is that you'd bump into Chicago and they'd waste their time.

 

So this isn't the best way to go sometimes.

 

Yeah, I have a question for the OP - if becoming a conductor would require you to move around a lot and leave your home state often, would you be willing to do it?

 

This is a question for everyone who looks at a career on the RR. Are you willing to be away from home for an extended period of time. Does your family understand. The list goes on. Some crews that work for Amtrak don't have to worry about being put up in a hotel. Such as NEC crews, certain CA crews, as well as some crews in the Midwest and Northwest.

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The snack car attendant on my last trip on the CZ lived a few miles from my home in Pittsburgh. He worked mainly the western LD trains. He said he would just hop on Amtrak to get to where he was working. Unfortunately he was not paid for travel time to work. ;)

 

I was busy with my previous reply when this popped up.

 

Many NEC crews will "deadhead" from PHL to NYP and back to go to and from work. But I will stress that these folks are on held jobs, NOT the extra board.

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Ok thanks... unfortunately my state isn't hiring... I'll keep looking

You might have to settle for "other" locations until you gain seniority. Doing so, at least you would have "your foot in the door".

 

Good point. I don't think it is reasonable to target an entry level job on any Amtrak route that is entirely within your home state.

 

Well that brings up another possibility...say taking an "entry level" job at Amtrak in a different craft than that you desire....would that be advisable?

For example...say you live in Omaha, and are looking for an Assistant Conductor position. Say there are no current opening's, but there are in other location's. Say at the same time, there are opening's in Omaha for station services jobs.

 

Would it be better to try first for the station service's job, and then later apply for an internal transfer to the job you want; or would it be better to apply for the job you want, that will give you seniority, and hope to get a job 'back home' later when they become available? Either way has its points to consider.... :unsure:

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Ok thanks... unfortunately my state isn't hiring... I'll keep looking

You might have to settle for "other" locations until you gain seniority. Doing so, at least you would have "your foot in the door".

 

Good point. I don't think it is reasonable to target an entry level job on any Amtrak route that is entirely within your home state.

 

Well that brings up another possibility...say taking an "entry level" job at Amtrak in a different craft than that you desire....would that be advisable?

For example...say you live in Omaha, and are looking for an Assistant Conductor position. Say there are no current opening's, but there are in other location's. Say at the same time, there are opening's in Omaha for station services jobs.

 

Would it be better to try first for the station service's job, and then later apply for an internal transfer to the job you want; or would it be better to apply for the job you want, that will give you seniority, and hope to get a job 'back home' later when they become available? Either way has its points to consider.... :unsure:

 

 

It's certainly a good idea. That was my plan with the call center. Get my foot in the door, get a good reputation and move back to T&E. I would do that if I were someone looking to get their foot in the door.

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Yes...I would think (and hope), it is not a certainty, in all cases, that someone that has established a good record at a company would have a better shot at another job or craft within the same company, then someone who is coming "off the street", so-to-speak. Of course, if the person from the outside has certification of some sort in the job applied for, that could be different...

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Amtrak definitely promotes from within. I interviewed for an AC job with Amtrak back in March. That job was for Harrisburg. I saw that I was competing with internal candidates. That's probably part of the reason I didn't get the job.

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One question for the thread starter: What state are you in (you mention "[your] state" doesn't have any openings)?

 

If you're in some western (but not west coast) state where Amtrak only has long-distance service, and trains only operate once per day...well, unfortunately, the number of conductors likely to be based out of that state (if any at all) is going to be extremely low. Also, not every state on a route is necessarily going to have a crew base, and they're only going to hire conductors out of crew bases.

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Most jobs are in D.C.... plus I go wherever my husband pcs to. I searched site after site for getting into railroads and keep getting sent down the rabbit hole

I gather you are a military wife (PCS = permanent change of station, I believe). Being subject to his moving around may not play well with where Amtrak would need/like you to be.

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