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Acela 2150 decouples at 125mph (2/6/18)

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A high-speed Amtrak train bound for Penn Station broke apart as it was cruising through Maryland on Tuesday, sources told The Post.

The 2150 Acela was traveling from Washington D.C. to the Big Apple when the incident happened at about 11:20 a.m. The train was traveling at about 125 mph, according to the source.

“Someone could have been walking through the train when that happened and fell to their death,” said the source.

 

 

https://nypost.com/2018/02/06/amtrak-train-breaks-apart-at-125-mph/?utm_source=NYPTwitter&utm_medium=SocialFlow&utm_campaign=SocialFlow

 

amtrak_acela.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=

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I believe this is a more accurate/updated quote from the article

 

 

The 2150 Acela was traveling from Washington D.C. to the Big Apple when the incident happened at about 6:30 a.m. The train was traveling at about 125 mph, according to the source.

“Someone could have been walking through the train when that happened and fell to their death,” said the source.

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Why would anyone be walking between the locomotive and the coaches at speed?

Huh? Can't people walk throughout the train if they want to?

 

jb

 

The derailment happened between the locomotive and the first coach. Usually they keep that door locked. I suppose PennyK's hypothetical could be if the decoupling happened anywhere else in the train. But in this case it didn't. Was between the loco and first coach.

 

That picture makes one wonder if the train was recently in the shop and the coupling pin was incorrectly installed, forgotten, or if it hadn't been recently serviced, fatigued. If the last, then all trains need to stop now and be inspected.

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The article says between two cars... The news may be wrong but I don't see any other source saying it was between the locomotive and a coach.

What kept the train connected at 125?

Edited by crescent-zephyr

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Why would anyone be walking between the locomotive and the coaches at speed?

Huh? Can't people walk throughout the train if they want to?

 

jb

 

The derailment happened between the locomotive and the first coach. Usually they keep that door locked. I suppose PennyK's hypothetical could be if the decoupling happened anywhere else in the train. But in this case it didn't. Was between the loco and first coach.

 

There was no derailment.

 

The uncopupling did not happen between the power head and first coach. it was betwwen the First Class and the Quiet Car. That would be the first and second passenger car, so indeed someone could have been walking through. Fortunately that was not the case.

Edited by jis

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Why would anyone be walking between the locomotive and the coaches at speed?

Huh? Can't people walk throughout the train if they want to?

 

jb

 

The derailment happened between the locomotive and the first coach. Usually they keep that door locked. I suppose PennyK's hypothetical could be if the decoupling happened anywhere else in the train. But in this case it didn't. Was between the loco and first coach.

 

There was no derailment.

 

The uncopupling did not happen between the power head and first coach. it was betwwen the First Class and the Quiet Car. That would be the first and second passenger car, so indeed someone could have been walking through. Fortunately that was not the case.

 

The derailment was a misspeak. But the images I saw showed a greater space between the locomotive and the first coach. Could have been normal, but that's what the photos showed. I'll be happy to stand corrected.

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Why would anyone be walking between the locomotive and the coaches at speed?

Huh? Can't people walk throughout the train if they want to?

 

jb

 

The derailment happened between the locomotive and the first coach. Usually they keep that door locked. I suppose PennyK's hypothetical could be if the decoupling happened anywhere else in the train. But in this case it didn't. Was between the loco and first coach.

 

There was no derailment.

 

The uncopupling did not happen between the power head and first coach. it was betwwen the First Class and the Quiet Car. That would be the first and second passenger car, so indeed someone could have been walking through. Fortunately that was not the case.

 

The derailment was a misspeak. But the images I saw showed a greater space between the locomotive and the first coach. Could have been normal, but that's what the photos showed. I'll be happy to stand corrected.

 

Then please do stand corrected because that photo was not showing where the break was. It was showing where an evacuation ladder had been affixed to the door.

 

The gap that you saw is the normal gap between a power head and the adjacent car.

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I don't hang out in vestibules, even when the train crew allowed it.

 

I used to, until I was educated out of it. Vestibules are designed to crumple first in the event of a severe collision.

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Our local news said that an "Amtrak train broke apart while traveling at high speeds". That made me vision the train was traveling too fast, and due to that excessive speed, broke into millions of pieces. I thought, not again, and headed here for some details. Thankfully, I see the truth is that a coupler simply unhooked.

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What ever has happened, simply happened at the worst time....right on the heels of the other events that has kept Amtrak in the negative spotlight..... :(

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What ever has happened, simply happened at the worst time....right on the heels of the other events that has kept Amtrak in the negative spotlight..... :(

 

Timing is everything. When it rains, it pours but at least no one was hurt!

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What ever has happened, simply happened at the worst time....right on the heels of the other events that has kept Amtrak in the negative spotlight..... :(

Timing is everything. When it rains, it pours but at least no one was hurt!

Very true.

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Though technically the vestibule is everything from the door into the cabin area to the next car, same spot, being in the vestibule per se is not as risky as being in the gangway connection - where the plates are actually moving under you.

 

I say that only because peering out the windows is not near as dangerous as being in the gangway in the event of a derailment. Even at a 125 MPH, I don't think you'll get sucked out the opening.

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Though technically the vestibule is everything from the door into the cabin area to the next car, same spot, being in the vestibule per se is not as risky as being in the gangway connection - where the plates are actually moving under you.

 

I say that only because peering out the windows is not near as dangerous as being in the gangway in the event of a derailment. Even at a 125 MPH, I don't think you'll get sucked out the opening.

I would have to argue there's a difference here. You want to tell people the bathrooms are in the vestibule?

 

Sent from my SM-G955U using Amtrak Forum mobile app

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Though technically the vestibule is everything from the door into the cabin area to the next car, same spot, being in the vestibule per se is not as risky as being in the gangway connection - where the plates are actually moving under you.

 

I say that only because peering out the windows is not near as dangerous as being in the gangway in the event of a derailment. Even at a 125 MPH, I don't think you'll get sucked out the opening.

I would have to argue there's a difference here. You want to tell people the bathrooms are in the vestibule?

 

Sent from my SM-G955U using Amtrak Forum mobile app

 

Put your glasses on. He said peeRing, not peeing. ;)

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Though technically the vestibule is everything from the door into the cabin area to the next car, same spot, being in the vestibule per se is not as risky as being in the gangway connection - where the plates are actually moving under you.

 

I say that only because peering out the windows is not near as dangerous as being in the gangway in the event of a derailment. Even at a 125 MPH, I don't think you'll get sucked out the opening.

I would have to argue there's a difference here. You want to tell people the bathrooms are in the vestibule?

 

Sent from my SM-G955U using Amtrak Forum mobile app

Put your glasses on. He said peeRing, not peeing. ;)
Peeing out a window that doesn't open would be dangerous too! What a nice slipping hazard that'd be.

 

But in all seriousness, for those who aren't familiar with the Acelas, let me clarify my post. You need to walk from the passenger cabin through the door in to the "vestibule" to get to the ADA bathroom.

 

Sent from my SM-G955U using Amtrak Forum mobile app

Edited by Triley

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Though technically the vestibule is everything from the door into the cabin area to the next car, same spot, being in the vestibule per se is not as risky as being in the gangway connection - where the plates are actually moving under you.

 

I say that only because peering out the windows is not near as dangerous as being in the gangway in the event of a derailment. Even at a 125 MPH, I don't think you'll get sucked out the opening.

I would have to argue there's a difference here. You want to tell people the bathrooms are in the vestibule?

 

Sent from my SM-G955U using Amtrak Forum mobile app

Put your glasses on. He said peeRing, not peeing. ;)
Peeing out a window that doesn't open would be dangerous too! What a nice slipping hazard that'd be.

 

But in all seriousness, for those who aren't familiar with the Acelas, let me clarify my post. You need to walk from the passenger cabin through the door in to the "vestibule" to get to the ADA bathroom.

 

Sent from my SM-G955U using Amtrak Forum mobile app

 

Ah. I've only ridden the Acela 3 times. Though the most recent time was just a few months ago, I don't remember where the bathroom was (and I'm sure I must have used it).

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In a message with another AU member I said that in my 26 years on this earth I actually am wondering what is going on at Amtrak. 5 IMO major incidents in the past 3 years. 188 in May 2015, 2 incidents in the Northwest 1 of which was fatal, The Silver Star last weekend, and 2150's separation yesterday.

 

My main concern is the separation of a Semi-Permanent trainset. That should never happen period. Whether this falls on Bombardier or not is no excuse.

 

The Silver Star incident seems to be falling on CSX and that crew for falsely reporting a switch lined and locked normal. But Amtrak was sadly involved in that case.

 

But the one thing that's for sure is that someone and specifically Richard Anderson will have to answer to someone about what in the world is going on. Personally I wish that Wick Moorman stayed on longer as President and CEO. He was and is the man to address such serious issues. Look at how he handled New York Penn last summer. He did the right thing then and he would do the right thing now.

 

I do have some concern on this matter. But it's not enough for me to say that I won't ride the train.

 

It seems that this is an absolutely dark and trying time for Passenger Rail. Not just Amtrak, but all commuter railroads as well. It seems that NJT is in absolute shambles. Metro North is slowly recovering from their incidents a few years ago. MBTA is struggling with their commuter contractor Keolis.

 

I have faith that this will turn around and trains will become safer then ever before. I just have to ask how long it will take. I think that Richard Anderson is on a good path of turning around Amtrak's Safety record as he was under the watchful eye of Wick Moorman who was huge on safety at NS.

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