Jump to content
Philly Amtrak Fan

Are You Afraid Of Flying?

Flying  

66 members have voted

You do not have permission to vote in this poll, or see the poll results. Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

Recommended Posts

Most of my flights are personal rather than business and I prefer to have the whole thing wrapped up at booking time.

Yep, if for personal travel I'm much agreed. Not getting tickled until 3 days before travel drives me insane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can fly for free and can even avoid TSA at a lot of airports, yet every now and then I take the train. Some routes like SEA-PDX, SEA-YVR, ORD-MKE, the train is just better suited. Unfortunately there just aren't that many of those pairings.

Flying NRSA (standby), is a lot tougher now than it was many years ago. The Yield Management has got the load factors at an all-time high, so its's difficult to enjoy that privilege...of course being jumpseat eligible, increases your chances... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being able to ride with the cargo guys helps too. The hours aren't the best, but it's pretty much a guaranteed first class to where you want to go.

 

My company needs a reciprocal jumpseat agreement with BNSF, then I'd take the train a lot more. I'm sure the FAA and FRA wouldn't stand in the way of that at all...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being able to ride with the cargo guys helps too. The hours aren't the best, but it's pretty much a guaranteed first class to where you want to go.

 

My company needs a reciprocal jumpseat agreement with BNSF, then I'd take the train a lot more. I'm sure the FAA and FRA wouldn't stand in the way of that at all...

While your getting those arrangements done, you might as well include Cunard Line....the Queen Mary 2 has lots of "jump seats" on its bridge.... :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When my older sister got married in late 1960s, her new husband decided to save money on their honeymoon by flying standby. He got bumped at the last minute. His new bride wound up in Denver with no husband, no money and contemplating an early divorce. He chose...poorly. :)

 

As for me, I fly infrequently and do find myself saying a prayer when we take off. Probably comes from reading too many stories about crashes. Even if statistically speaking of course, it's still the safest way to travel. That along with the lack of room in coach, poor window views, and TSA strip searches make me not too thrilled with the flying experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was watching some Horizons episode about plane crashes and they claimed that flying was the second scariest event in most people's lives. Only public speaking was worse. I can understand the public speaking part. Public speaking is something you perform yourself and are immediately judged upon. If it's a disaster then it's all on you for screwing it up. Most of us don't do much public speaking on a regular basis and thus rarely have much time to get used to it.

 

However, flying is relatively common for many of us, so common in fact that we begin to take it for granted. You can fly while reading a book or watching a movie or even sleeping. Nothing terribly scary about any of that. No matter how bad the flight goes you're not going to be held responsible for it unless you're in a cockpit or control tower. I guess many people fear being injured or killed but those are irrational fears that aren't based on statistically significant threats. If anything those people should fear getting inside a fast car or slippery bathtub or dark alleyway instead.

 

 

 

When my older sister got married in late 1960s, her new husband decided to save money on their honeymoon by flying standby. He got bumped at the last minute. His new bride wound up in Denver with no husband, no money and contemplating an early divorce. He chose...poorly.

And she chose...him. 50/50 screwup IMO.

Edited by Devil's Advocate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Now, B6 for jetBlue, OO for SkyWest, and even 2V for Amtrak? No clue.

 

 

JetBlue; B for Blue and 6 for Terminal 6 at JFK which was their first main hub. Now they operate out of the newly built Terminal 5.

Edited by saxman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like others said, NOT afraid of flying whatsoever! Just find it undesirable with the higher ticket cost vs. Amtrak, the TSA security process (the no liquids in carry on bags rule especially annoys me), how tightly packed and less legroom between seats it is on flights (vs. Amtrak), and finally how all airlines except Southwest (I believe, correct me if there are others out there too) have moved to charging for checked baggage.

 

I'd so rather take Amtrak if I have a choice, since it's FAR more relaxing vs. flying. It isn't as fast, but if I can, I'd rather take Amtrak over flying. And the occasional smoke/fresh air stops are nice on long distance trains, too. I know they can't always do those for late running trains(when they're shortened or eliminated), but it is a nice feature about long distance train travel, if the train is running on time or not too late off the normal schedule.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not afraid to fly. I hate flying for what it's become because of regulations and being sandwiched in between a bunch of stressful people. People are in such a hurry these days. Taking the train brings life to a more relaxed and enjoyable pace. I'm not in a hurry. I want to be comfortable and enjoy life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have only been scared once in this life on an aircraft, and that was along about '94 on a "what's that airline" chartered for a Vegas package tour (had a GF -now deceased - who thought I was "too loose with the loot"; so she announced "we're going to Vegas MY way - on the cheap").

 

Well, I have no idea how many flight hours he had to his name, but his final to KLAS 26R should have been a go around. No he ended up "diving" with about half the Runway gone.

 

Hard to believe, he was standing at the door. I had to say something: "Hey, liked your Fighter Pilot approach". All I got back was a smile of sorts.

Edited by GBNorman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have only been scared once in this life on an aircraft, and that was along about '94 on a "what's that airline" chartered for a Vegas package tour (had a GF -now deceased - who thought I was "too loose with the loot"; so she announced "we're going to Vegas MY way - on the cheap"). Well, I have no idea how many flight hours he had to his name, but his final to KLAS 26R should have been a go around. No he ended up "diving" with about half the Runway gone. Hard to believe, he was standing at the door. I had to say something: "Hey, liked your Fighter Pilot approach". All I got back was a smile of sorts.

 

I'm curious how you went about determining that half the runway distance was exhausted prior to touchdown. Were you matching up markers to an airport diagram as the plane was landing? If LAS were your home airport I could understand being able to simply guesstimate the distance through basic situational awareness but it doesn't seem that's the case from your post.

Edited by Devil's Advocate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If LAS were your home airport I could understand being able to simply guesstimate the distance through basic situational awareness but it doesn't seem that's the case from your post.

"Situational awareness" sums it up. I think I've been on enough flights over the years - and sitting window forward or aft of the wing depending on what I'm willing to pay for - to know how the ground should look on an approach. In that instance, I think he was some 700ft AGL at the threshold. The runway's warning lights were quite visible and he had to make a turnaround to get to a taxiway.

 

Aircraft was an MD-80 varietal.

 

What more can this "pilot" with about 100 hours of "Air Microsoft" say?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

If LAS were your home airport I could understand being able to simply guesstimate the distance through basic situational awareness but it doesn't seem that's the case from your post.

"Situational awareness" sums it up. I think I've been on enough flights over the years - and sitting window forward or aft of the wing depending on what I'm willing to pay for - to know how the ground should look on an approach. In that instance, I think he was some 700ft AGL at the threshold. The runway's warning lights were quite visible and he had to make a turnaround to get to a taxiway.

 

Aircraft was an MD-80 varietal.

 

What more can this "pilot" with about 100 hours of "Air Microsoft" say?

Okay. I'm going to address everything you just said.

  • "Situational awareness" doesn't let you magically calculate runway lengths.
  • How do you know how experienced this pilot was?
  • I have almost 6000 hours on Flight Simulator X and I'm still not be qualified to judge a real pilot or a landing from the cabin of an airliner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get critiqued by passengers all the time, and have had some even try to argue with me about my flying technique when landing (i.e. flap settings, speeds, etc). I typically just smile and wish them a good day,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get critiqued by passengers all the time, and have had some even try to argue with me about my flying technique when landing (i.e. flap settings, speeds, etc). I typically just smile and wish them a good day,

Everyone's a Better Driver and Pilot than the actual Driver/Pilot when playing Arm Chair Commando!😑😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get critiqued by passengers all the time, and have had some even try to argue with me about my flying technique when landing (i.e. flap settings, speeds, etc).

Actually, I am rather shocked at hearing this....I couldn't even imagine someone to have the utter gall to do that.... :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I get critiqued by passengers all the time, and have had some even try to argue with me about my flying technique when landing (i.e. flap settings, speeds, etc).

Actually, I am rather shocked at hearing this....I couldn't even imagine someone to have the utter gall to do that.... :wacko:

 

It's not that surprising to me. I've heard passengers criticize or congratulate pilots over the softness/harshness of the landing many times. I can't recall ever seeing an an extended technical argument but I don't normally stick around to chat with the crew so maybe it happens after I'm gone. If the weather is really poor then even a hard landing seems to garner a lot of positive feedback. Although, to the best of my understanding the rougher the landing the more likely it was handled by an auto-land algorithm. Apparently auto-land focuses on firm planting for safety rather than soft landing for comfort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I get critiqued by passengers all the time, and have had some even try to argue with me about my flying technique when landing (i.e. flap settings, speeds, etc).

Actually, I am rather shocked at hearing this....I couldn't even imagine someone to have the utter gall to do that.... :wacko:

 

It's not that surprising to me. I've heard passengers criticize or congratulate pilots over the softness/harshness of the landing many times. I can't recall ever seeing an an extended technical argument but I don't normally stick around to chat with the crew so maybe it happens after I'm gone. If the weather is really poor then even a hard landing seems to garner a lot of positive feedback. Although, to the best of my understanding the rougher the landing the more likely it was handled by an auto-land algorithm. Apparently auto-land focuses on firm planting for safety rather than soft landing for comfort.

 

 

My very first flight with a passenger (other than an instructor or check pilot) was with my mother the night I got my ticket, in the Super Decathlon I learned to fly in. I took her up for a circle tour following the Gulf Freeway as far as Galveston, around the island, up along the shore of Galveston Bay, then following the Ship Channel back towards downtown before turning south for Hobby Airport and 12 Right. The sky was clear and all of the city and refinery lights were on; it was magical. I don't care how long I fly or how many airplanes I fly in, I'll never make a better landing. We never even felt the wheels touch. June 30th, 1998; exactly one hour on the Hobbs meter. Wish I could do it again.

 

Edit To Add: This isn't me in the picture, but this is the plane:

 

post-4967-0-36313500-1537050801_thumb.jpg

Edited by ehbowen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do have a fear of flying. Driving is the easiest for me because I am in "control" of the situation but I have grown to be able to take Amtrak as an alternative to flying and to save myself drving everywhere. Sometimes I even get nervous on the train but its far more manageable being on the ground. In addition to the fear I am not the smallest person in the world and the cramped economy seating on coach flights makes the trip unenjoayable and adding the discomfort the genreal dislike/fear of flying. If Im going to spend a bunch on premium accommodations I'd rather get a sleeper on an Amtrak train.

 

Flying just involves a tremendous amount of stress for me leading up to the trip. I don't encounter the same level of fear/stress taking the train or driving.

Edited by lordsigma

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ehbowen:loved your First Flight with a Passenger story!😎

 

Mine was in a Cessna 172 with my Wife and Daughter around the Hill Country,Canyon Lake followed by a Landing @ San Antonio International (SAT) for Dinner.

 

I made a Greaser of a Landing @ SAT and also upon returning home to San Marcos Loman Field.( now a Shopping Mall!😣).

 

On the way to SAT I had to look out for T-38s zipping in/out of Randolph FAB and then Airline Traffic upon entering the San Antonio TCA.

 

Wonderful Memories are made from things like this!( My daughter is now 50 and she still talks about it!)

Edited by Bob Dylan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. I didn't realize how many people here have pilots' licenses. Hopefully this'll be me some day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do have a fear of flying. Driving is the easiest for me because I am in "control"...

 

Flying just involves a tremendous amount of stress for me leading up to the trip.

"It doesn't matter how straight the gate,

How charged the punishments and scroll.

For I am the master of my fate,

I am the Captain of my soul".

 

Invictus

William Ernest Henley

 

Just like you, I don't drive under any of the "three D's" - Drunk, Doped, Drowsy.

 

I know full well how the statistical odds are so much more with you with either rail or air transportation, but if situational awareness is lost by me behind the wheel, I stand accountable. I need not be concerned with, however unintentional, a Locomotive Engineer loses same and causes fatalities, or an airline Flight Deck where "the Captain's word is law" and no other Officer dare challenge that he is missing a visual approach (Asiana SFO Jul '13).

Edited by GBNorman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

or an airline Flight Deck where "the Captain's word is law" and no other Officer dare challenge that he is missing a visual approach (Asiana SFO Jul '13).

I thought that "Cockpit Resource Management" training was supposed to correct that old culture.... :unsure:

Edited by railiner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

or an airline Flight Deck where "the Captain's word is law" and no other Officer dare challenge that he is missing a visual approach (Asiana SFO Jul '13).
I thought that "Cockpit Resource Management" training was supposed to correct that old culture.... :unsure:
According to the accident report Asiana’s problem was that it had poor to non-existent CRM in deference to Asian Culture if unquestioned obedience of the senior person.

 

They have supposedly fixed this since then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×