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AEM7 Retirement

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The GG1s lasted a long, long time. They actually only got retired when the technology became obsolete and they started to be considered an environmental hazard (they were full of PCBs, among other things). That's an impressive run.

 

To be fair, the AEM-7-DCs have also lasted well beyond the point when they were obsolete, and the AEM-7-ACs are also obsolete technology (have been ever since regenerative braking became standard), and the P42s are also obsolete (don't meet current emissions standards, or even the emissions standards three rounds back, and again, no regenerative braking).

 

But this is an interesting contrast to locomotives being retired because the individual locomotive has worn out. The Heritage dining cars and baggage cars are being retired due to structural and component failures, not due to design obsolescence.

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IRM (outside Chicago) has an overhead electric system, however I don't know the capabilities of it. They normally run interurban and streetcars on it, but they do own some regular electric engines (including a GG1). I don't know if they can actually run the regular electric engines on their system. It looks fairly light, but then they don't have much distance to travel, so you aren't going to see speeds requiring a high-tension system.

 

peter

 

I think it is 750 volts DC. They run some electric engines sometimes but there is no way that they could run an AEM7.

 

 

The UK has several preserved and operational AC locomotives, but no museum with working AC electrification. These locomotives are used on excursion trains on the main line. Interestingly some have even been hired for regular train work to cover temporary locomotive shortages.

 

I don't think we're likely to see any museum with working AC any time soon. AC electrification is far more complex than DC and due to the higher voltages, the safety standards are far more exacting

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The GG1s lasted a long, long time. They actually only got retired when the technology became obsolete and they started to be considered an environmental hazard (they were full of PCBs, among other things). That's an impressive run.

Not to mention when their frames started cracking making them not worth the cost to repair anymore too.

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Guest pvd

For regenerative braking (versus dynamic) the power has to be returned to the grid, used to supplement HEP generation, or stored (think batteries in a hybrid car). The emissions standards have certainly tightened since the P42's came on the property, but regen braking in a road diesel (as opposed to an electric) would probably not make sense.

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The GG1s lasted a long, long time. They actually only got retired when the technology became obsolete and they started to be considered an environmental hazard (they were full of PCBs, among other things). That's an impressive run.

Not to mention when their frames started cracking making them not worth the cost to repair anymore too.

 

 

It's unfortunate one will never run under their own power again. The preserved A/C MP54s though (if any are still in decent condition) might have a chance, since they didn't use PCBs.

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For regenerative braking (versus dynamic) the power has to be returned to the grid, used to supplement HEP generation, or stored (think batteries in a hybrid car). The emissions standards have certainly tightened since the P42's came on the property, but regen braking in a road diesel (as opposed to an electric) would probably not make sense.

It's being used for HEP in new designs; also the batteries tend to be significantly beefed up relative to older designs.

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For regenerative braking (versus dynamic) the power has to be returned to the grid, used to supplement HEP generation, or stored (think batteries in a hybrid car). The emissions standards have certainly tightened since the P42's came on the property, but regen braking in a road diesel (as opposed to an electric) would probably not make sense.

 

It's not only about energy saved.

 

Regenerate braking means less energy converted to heat and this can be an issue in temperature control on the locomotive as well as wear on brake blocks.

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Guest pvd

I probably should have spelled that out more carefully. The heat dissipation in dynamic braking is a significant issue, and its impact cannot be ignored. Any energy released by the combustion of fuel that is used to run the train (or its services) instead of becoming waste heat is a plus. The new Siemens Chargers will do some regen during dynamic braking which will augment HEP. What I really didn't state (and should have) is that the greatest advantages of regen are seen when large quantities of power can be returned to the grid (like ACS-64), or in a d/e where acceleration and deceleration occur most frequently which would probably be in commuter or short haul rather than long haul.

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pvd, your comment reminded me of the time Seattle bought several hundred hybrid buses and then used most of them on suburban routes with primarily highway miles. Oddly enough, the hybrid buses didn't get much better mpg than the conventional diesel buses. Regen doesn't do you much good if you only start and stop a couple times a trip.

 

http://www.seattlepi.com/local/transportation/article/Hybrid-buses-fuel-economy-promises-don-t-1161842.php

 

I probably should have spelled that out more carefully. The heat dissipation in dynamic braking is a significant issue, and its impact cannot be ignored. Any energy released by the combustion of fuel that is used to run the train (or its services) instead of becoming waste heat is a plus. The new Siemens Chargers will do some regen during dynamic braking which will augment HEP. What I really didn't state (and should have) is that the greatest advantages of regen are seen when large quantities of power can be returned to the grid (like ACS-64), or in a d/e where acceleration and deceleration occur most frequently which would probably be in commuter or short haul rather than long haul.

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Guest pvd

In NYC we have exactly that issue. Orion Hybrids with BAE drives (we have lots of them) turn in decent numbers in congested areas with lots of starts and stops, but in areas with freer flowing traffic and less stops, they do much worse. To the point that they have considered re powering a large batch to clean diesel at midlife overhaul. (considered, not moved ahead on) Of course the MDBF numbers aren't great on them regardless. Supposedly, the Allison hybrids are more suitable for better moving traffic, but I don't know the numbers.

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931 and 945 are now retired. ALL AEM-7DC units are OOS.

 

Celebration :) Just need another Sprinter or two to weed out a car or two of the weakest rebuilds so another month 3 Sprinters should arrive. Good for Amtrak and customers alike. The AEM-7DC lasted too long considering much better technologies have emerged and the AEM rebuilds are older but are very capable locomotives. Makes the northeastern corridor vastly better from the locomotive side.

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The killer app for battery-electric haulage is extreme start-stop situations; city buses which stop every block and are in heavy traffic, switching locomotives, etc. Zero idling + regenerative braking, works out a lot better than fuel burning.

 

For long steady hauls, fuel burning is still fairly efficient.

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931 and 945 are now retired. ALL AEM-7DC units are OOS.

Celebration :) Just need another Sprinter or two to weed out a car or two of the weakest rebuilds so another month 3 Sprinters should arrive. Good for Amtrak and customers alike. The AEM-7DC lasted too long considering much better technologies have emerged and the AEM rebuilds are older but are very capable locomotives. Makes the northeastern corridor vastly better from the locomotive side.

 

 

The Sprinters break down more than would be expected from new motors. That is not good for Amtrak or customers.

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I doubt that the Sprinters are performing badly. If they need some tweaks, Siemens should be able to handle them quickly across the fleet. Plus they will have AEM7 rebuilds as fallbacks in case repairs are needed. The Non rebuilds really had to go.

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Guest H. Bitler

915 & 926 are AEM-DCs Only 29 locos were remanufactured to AC

rumor is that 915 will go to the Strasburg Rail Road.

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915 & 926 are AEM-DCs Only 29 locos were remanufactured to AC

rumor is that 915 will go to the Strasburg Rail Road.

what would Strasburg want with a modern electric motor? They aim at a turn of the century (19th into 20th) atmosphere with steam locomotives. I believe a Toaster will go to the Pennsylvania Railroad Museum, which is across the street from the Strasburg.

Edited by MikefromCrete

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not Strasbourg railroad but Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasbourg, two very different things.

 

 

People get this confused all the time. There are two separate entities in Strasburg. Strasburg Railroad is a passenger excursion tourist railroad and they do haul freight (often with a steam locomotive). Across the street is the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania which is a museum operated by the Pennsylvania Historic and Museum Commission. Many people call the museum Pennsylvania Railroad museum. While the collection started out as the collection of historic locomotives from the Pennsylvania Railroad that they preserved, the museums goal is to preserve and interpret anything railroad in Pennsylvania.

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not Strasbourg railroad but Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasbourg, two very different things.

 

What's this Strasbourg place?? Never heard of it. Strasburg, I've heard of.

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An interesting train will be when the AEM7 goes to RRPA. It will get pulled on the Strasburg Railroad. Maybe even a steam engine will take it. That would be a good photo. Steam engine with an electric trailing

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