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RickIronton

Chicago - St Louis high speed rail

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I’ve seriously become disillusioned about this entire project. It’s ridiculous. China has built an entire bullet train network in the time Illinois has done nothing.

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I’ve seriously become disillusioned about this entire project. It’s ridiculous. China has built an entire bullet train network in the time Illinois has done nothing.

China is a more advanced country than Illinois is a state?

 

With only one party, China doesn't need to have its politicians waste time and money on political corruption when commercial corruption is more efficient?

 

China is advancing from the 16th century whereas Illinois is only advancing from the 19th?

 

Random thoughts from a lost mind.

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The main reason why I ask is that we are beginning to arrive early to stations enroute.  We had to hold at SPI for 20 minutes, Carlinville for 10, etc.  A good problem to have, but as an end to end customer, I would like to see the schedule condensed a bit.

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Maybe it's time to start writing to Illinois DOT and asking them about getting agreement to shorten the schedules.  There is no reason why the Texas Eagle, or any of the other trains, should be artificially slowed down.  (I could understand a big fat wait in St. Louis for the northbound Texas Eagle, to allow for any delays further south without messing up the schedule further north, but not on the rest of the route.)

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Thanks.  There was talk in May that the segments were going to be allowed 90 mph operation q3 or 4 2018, then 110 in in 2019.  I would hope that this means schedules are already drafted by the bureaucrats.

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This whole project has taken absolutely forever and there is no reason for trains not to be running at 110 right now.

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I asked and the project team responded. The response did not include any timeline, only that if Amtrak does increase speeds, there is no plan to condense the schedule.

 

" A significant portion of the Chicago to St. Louis High-Speed Rail corridor infrastructure is now in place and the program is installing Positive Train Control (PTC), a safety system that uses advanced communication systems to avoid collisions with other trains, protect maintenance workers, and enforce speeds in slow zones. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) has issued PTC guidance for running trains up to 90 MPH and field testing of the PTC system is required. Once PTC installation is complete and approved, Amtrak trains in the Chicago to St. Louis High-Speed Rail corridor will begin operating at higher speeds. At this time there is no plan for a change in the train schedule. "  -The Illinois High-Speed Rail Chicago to St. Louis Program Team

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No, they're not planning schedule changes until they get the tech straight (which may affect how much time they can pull out).

And I will concur that there are issues with implementing anything in a timely manner in the US.  Then again, the fact that there's a decent chance that Brightline is into Orlando before VA gets a Record of Decision on Richmond-Washington says plenty given that both projects started around the same time.

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On 10/30/2018 at 1:52 PM, Steve4031 said:

I’ve seriously become disillusioned about this entire project. It’s ridiculous. China has built an entire bullet train network in the time Illinois has done nothing.

"Mussolini made the trains run on time!"

It was a common statement at one time, with a small grain of truth to it, but it is kind of related to the issue of why China can build a world class train system in a relatively short amount of time whereas a more advanced economy like the US stumbles from one problem to another. There is little doubt that a fascist like Mussolini, or an autocracy like the Communist Party of China, can achieve great things if they point their resources at a particular issue. But I doubt most of us would prefer to live there over a seemingly dysfunctional nation like those we have in the West.  But building the Italian train system from horrifically bad to moderately effective probably wasn't worth putting up with il Duce.

;-)

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This has got be the most billions spent for getting absolutely no effect on timetable. Bravo! :lol:

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Now that the voters have ousted Gov. Bruce Rauner, perhaps we will see some progress on this route, as well as the Quad Cities and Rockford trains. The state has been practically non functional during   the past four years.

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On 11/7/2018 at 10:23 AM, neroden said:

There is no reason why the Texas Eagle, or any of the other trains, should be artificially slowed down.

&

On 11/7/2018 at 8:07 PM, daybeers said:

This whole project has taken absolutely forever and there is no reason for trains not to be running at 110 right now.

Unless I'm mistaken nobody wrote faster speeds or shorter schedules for the other trains into the original upgrade agreement and after the upgrade was completed the freight host indicated they had no interest in making any further changes without additional compensation or other considerations.  Profit motive can be an especially compelling reason for arbitrarily resisting even benign progress.

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On 12/10/2013 at 12:26 PM, RickIronton said:

Since Amtrak inaugurated high speed between Joliet and Dwight IL, I have observed through Amtrak's train tracking the highest speed of 99 mph.

Does this corridor ever live up to "Illinois High-Speed Rail" advertisements of higher speed considering the fact that 110 mph was obtainable?

I would not consider either of those "high speed."  But, then again, I'm spoiled by the Japanese Shinkansen trains as well as Thallys, both of which can reach 320Kph and more.

I wouldn't even consider Acela (at 150mph)  "high speed."    Not by a long shot.

To me, "high speed" is a train that can get you to where you need to be and can be "competitive" with air travel between the same points, both in time savings and cost.  Where it cost less and takes less time to take a train than it is to fly (including ground time to get to/from each station/airport as well as on-boarding time)  and, where there is demand for that travel, I think high speed rail would work well, if we're talking Shinkansen/Thallys speeds.  Not sure if that means Chicago <---> St. Louis or not.  Frankly, I think even the Acela service between NY and Wash. DC is questionable. Perhaps it's OK between BOS and either NYP or Wash DC. Then again, I'm from a time when Eastern Air ran the BOS and DCA shuttle planes that were really cheap.   

 

Edited by AutoTrDvr

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2 hours ago, VentureForth said:

Who paid for this upgrade?  BNSF or Taxpayers?

IIRC taxpayers paid Union Pacific to perform the necessary upgrades.  Union Pacific agreed to allow passenger trains that were specifically mentioned in original contract to increase speeds, but also held other trains back unless and until more taxpayer money could be extracted on their behalf.

 

1 hour ago, AutoTrDvr said:

I would not consider either of those "high speed."  But, then again, I'm spoiled by the Japanese Shinkansen trains as well as Thallys, both of which can reach 320Kph and more. I wouldn't even consider Acela (at 150mph)  "high speed."    Not by a long shot.

In my view average speed across an entire route has a lot more relevance than some brief Goldilocks segment at top speed.  By my way of measuring Acela is a conventional 65MPH rail line masquerading as a 150MPH high speed train.

Edited by Devil's Advocate

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1 hour ago, Devil's Advocate said:

In my view average speed across an entire route has a lot more relevance than some brief Goldilocks segment at top speed.  By my way of measuring Acela is a conventional 65MPH rail line masquerading as a 150MPH high speed train.

Precisely.  The Shinkansen, TGV and Thallys all have the majority of their segments at those high speeds.  They make the grade.  Acela does not.

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