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Replying to LAX and Philippe's


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Shanghai

Posted 05 March 2012 - 03:34 PM




Or that pannini is already plural, just as spaghetti is plural?


In Italian, certainly. In English, no. No native English speaker would say, "There are left-over spaghetti in the refrigerator."


However, English speakers don't say, "There are left-over spaghettis in the refrigerator," (not valid in New Jersey) but they will say there are "panninis" in the refrigerator.


What's wrong with panninis? If it exists, pannini is an English word. The Italian for sandwiches would be "panini."


What's wrong with New Jersey residents saying there are spaghettis in the refrigerator? No one in New Jersey would put
their panninis in the refrigerator because they eat them warm!! What's the matter with youse guys, anyhow??

Ispolkom

Posted 05 March 2012 - 01:15 PM



Or that pannini is already plural, just as spaghetti is plural?


In Italian, certainly. In English, no. No native English speaker would say, "There are left-over spaghetti in the refrigerator."


However, English speakers don't say, "There are left-over spaghettis in the refrigerator," (not valid in New Jersey) but they will say there are "panninis" in the refrigerator.


What's wrong with panninis? If it exists, pannini is an English word. The Italian for sandwiches would be "panini."

p&sr

Posted 05 March 2012 - 11:29 AM



Or that pannini is already plural, just as spaghetti is plural?


In Italian, certainly. In English, no. No native English speaker would say, "There are left-over spaghetti in the refrigerator."


However, English speakers don't say, "There are left-over spaghettis in the refrigerator," (not valid in New Jersey) but they will say there are "panninis" in the refrigerator.

Still hungry? Sure, have another SPAGHETTUM. And there are more in the fridge.

sportbiker

Posted 04 March 2012 - 04:51 PM


Or that pannini is already plural, just as spaghetti is plural?


In Italian, certainly. In English, no. No native English speaker would say, "There are left-over spaghetti in the refrigerator."


However, English speakers don't say, "There are left-over spaghettis in the refrigerator," (not valid in New Jersey) but they will say there are "panninis" in the refrigerator.

smee

Posted 04 March 2012 - 01:06 AM



Or that pannini is already plural, just as spaghetti is plural?

In Italian, certainly. In English, no. No native English speaker would say, "There are left-over spaghetti in the refrigerator."

I couldn't say that, because I never leave any leftover spaghetti to put in the refrigerator!Posted Image


Do you mean, you've never had fried leftover spaghetti? You don't know what you're missing.

the_traveler

Posted 04 March 2012 - 12:34 AM


Or that pannini is already plural, just as spaghetti is plural?

In Italian, certainly. In English, no. No native English speaker would say, "There are left-over spaghetti in the refrigerator."

I couldn't say that, because I never leave any leftover spaghetti to put in the refrigerator!Posted Image

Dovecote

Posted 03 March 2012 - 10:00 PM

Dovecote .... thank you, I had completely forgotten about the cash only policy!


Happy to help and you should enjoy this establishment. I have been a patron of Philippe's since 1978.

hello

Posted 03 March 2012 - 09:41 PM

Dovecote .... thank you, I had completely forgotten about the cash only policy!

Ispolkom

Posted 03 March 2012 - 09:18 PM

Or that pannini is already plural, just as spaghetti is plural?


In Italian, certainly. In English, no. No native English speaker would say, "There are left-over spaghetti in the refrigerator."

sportbiker

Posted 03 March 2012 - 05:22 PM

Can I mention my own pet peeve of people calling a particular brand of upscale store Nordstrom's?

Or that pannini is already plural, just as spaghetti is plural?

Speaking of plural's, they don't take apostrophe's.

Class dismissed.

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