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Advice for First-Time Flyers


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#61 jis

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Posted Yesterday, 02:18 PM

I recall when they had an interchange flight with Braniff...LHR-IAD-DFW....
They remained subsonic, although faster than anything else, while operated by Braniff... :)

Yes, they did. LHR - IAD - DFW was BA/Braniff and CDG - JFK - DFW was AF/Braniff (or maybe it was the other way round - don;t quite recall, but both LHR and CDG were involved with BA and AF respectively). To avoid cabotage issues, the aircraft changed registration and lease ownership for the US leg to Braniff.This included putting a US registration number sticker covering the British/French registration on the plane for the duration of its flight within the US. It was really quite curious.



#62 cpotisch

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Posted Yesterday, 02:43 PM

 

I don't know about after-burner's in a civilian aircraft, other than the Concorde, which did not engage them until well off the coast. What really gave those early 707's smoke, was water-injection, used for extra takeoff thrust, IIRC


Your 707 explanation is correct, at least so far as I am aware, but the Concorde afterburners were actually engaged during takeoff, then disengaged shortly afterward while flying over land and then reengaged over the ocean again until nominal cruising speed was attained.

 

Yeah, the Concorde engaged afterburners on takeoff, disengaged them while flying over land, and then had to engage them again to punch through the sound barrier. Once it was at cruising speed, they disengaged the burners and supercruised from there on out.


Edited by cpotisch, Yesterday, 02:44 PM.

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#63 trainman74

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Posted Yesterday, 04:23 PM

To avoid cabotage issues, the aircraft changed registration and lease ownership for the US leg to Braniff.This included putting a US registration number sticker covering the British/French registration on the plane for the duration of its flight within the US. It was really quite curious.


Too bad this never actually existed:

sSQlOmm.jpg

#64 MARC Rider

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Posted Yesterday, 05:07 PM

Back around 1962 or thereabouts, my first flight was BAL (that was the code back then, BWI was the code for sime airport in Papua New Guinea) to MIA on a DC7. Talk about noisy in the cabin with 4 piston engines making quite the racket. We also flew at relatively low altitude, in and out of the cloulds and a rode like a roller coaster. When I was 15, I had an adventure of a charter flight with the Scouts in a DC4, 13 hours from Spokane to Philly, including a fueling stop in Rockford, IL. That was also pretty noisy. In fact, the turboprop commuter flights I've been on have also been more noisy than a jet, even the older jets. Is the main noise factor the enginr type (piston vs turbo) or the presence or absence of propellors as thrust generator?

Edited by MARC Rider, Yesterday, 05:08 PM.


#65 cpotisch

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Posted Yesterday, 05:23 PM

In fact, the turboprop commuter flights I've been on have also been more noisy than a jet, even the older jets. Is the main noise factor the enginr type (piston vs turbo) or the presence or absence of propellors as thrust generator?


Because the propellers are whipping through the air without anything enclosing it (which you would have in a jet), there isn’t much sheltering you from the sound of large metal blades whipping through the air. Also bear in mind that many turboprop aircraft in commercial service tend to be on the older side, and since they’re often pretty small, you might not be far from the engines. I would also note that the props are usually directly in front of the wings, whereas jet engines are forward and beneath he wings. Most of the noise you hear realize from a jet engine is the exhaust; which would be sheltered from passengers by the wing. Meanwhile the props are high up and right next to where the passengers are, which makes them that much noisier.
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#66 railiner

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Posted Yesterday, 08:47 PM

 

To avoid cabotage issues, the aircraft changed registration and lease ownership for the US leg to Braniff.This included putting a US registration number sticker covering the British/French registration on the plane for the duration of its flight within the US. It was really quite curious.


Too bad this never actually existed:

sSQlOmm.jpg

 

Besides interchanging with Braniff...both BA to London, and AF to Paris, as jis has mentioned, BA also interchanged with Singapore Airlines on a London-Bahrain-Singapore flight.

One BA Concorde was painted with Singapore livery on one side, and BA on the other.

 

The big difference between the operations, was only the flight attendants from Singapore worked their portion, the BA pilots went all the way. 

With Braniff, the entire crew were Braniff.  The Braniff pilots were trained and qualified on the Concorde--even supersonic, although they never flew their portion supersonic.


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metroblue?

okay on the blue!

#67 SarahZ

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Posted Yesterday, 08:59 PM

 

Thank you so much for posting this. I like that I feel like I'm traveling. What a cool effect. I keep expecting to feel some gentle turbulence. It's helping with my travel withdrawal. :)

 

Like you, the HVAC sound on trains helps me relax and sleep. I barely notice it until it's gone. Then I can hear EVERYTHING. It drives me bonkers. The white noise covers up so many random sounds. That's one reason I always sleep with a box fan. Without my fan, it's so quiet I can't sleep. Every little noise wakes me up.

 

I use a little fan at work for the same reason. I like the white noise, and I like that it keeps the air moving. I can't stand stale, stuffy air. When I'm on a plane, I point the air nozzle right at my face.  :D


Edited by SarahZ, Yesterday, 09:01 PM.

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