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Pacific Parlour Car Permanently Retired February 2018


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#341 Devil's Advocate

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 10:47 AM

 

Now that I think about it buying all five of the PPCs could make a good dinner train. #badideas

Or first reduce oneself to a Hundredaire from a Millionnaire as the necessary mechanical repairs and upgrades are completed using hand crafted replacement parts - or something like that. And then one has to figure out the food stuff and the rest of it.

Does the cost and severity of maintenance change if you remove them from active interchange duty and keep them isolated on private tracks?  Just wondering how relatively tiny tourist railroads keep their rolling stock funcational without running into Amtrak level maintenance problems.


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#342 jis

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 11:07 AM

I think a lot of volunteer labor and the relatively few pieces that have to be maintained to run at generally much slower speed with much lower accepted reliability makes a huge difference. Running stuff on an isolated tourist line is a very different thing from running cars attached to Amtrak trains on main line at track speed.

 

But Seaboard I am sure can give a much more knowledgeable answer.



#343 Seaboard92

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Posted Yesterday, 09:37 AM

I've never actually worked on an isolated network so I actually don't have an answer at least from experience. But I do have some anecdotal experience from friends in the industry.

The only completely off network one I've been exposed to by a friend is Stone Mountain Scenic and they purposely took their interchange out so they wouldn't be under the same regulations as every other railroad by no longer being under the FRA. Now I'm not sure how true that really is.

But one key fact to remember the slower you run the less wear and tear from operations you'll have. Now as far as HVAC that's a different story. So electrical stuff will still face the same load as before. I'll have to ask a few friends who are Carmen for an isolated road and see what they get back to me with.

For the record I wouldn't actually buy the PPCs I hate one of a kind equipment and try to avoid it when purchasing. Unless it's a Cascade Club from the Southern Pacific (Three unit diner, club, lounge) that's a one of a kind car that majorly interests me.
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Amtrak Routes I've riden: Silver Star(NYP-ORL), Silver Meteor(KIS-NYP),Carolinian(CLT-NWK), Palmetto (FLO-NYP), Acela(WAS-NYP), NE Regional(WBG-RVR), Pacific Surfliner(SAN-OSD), Piedmont(CLT-SAL), Crescent(NYP-CLT), Cardinal (WAS-CHI), Capitol Limited (CHI-WAS), Cascade (PDX-SEA)
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#344 RPC

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Posted Yesterday, 04:26 PM

 

 

Now that I think about it buying all five of the PPCs could make a good dinner train. #badideas

Or first reduce oneself to a Hundredaire from a Millionnaire as the necessary mechanical repairs and upgrades are completed using hand crafted replacement parts - or something like that. And then one has to figure out the food stuff and the rest of it.

Does the cost and severity of maintenance change if you remove them from active interchange duty and keep them isolated on private tracks?  Just wondering how relatively tiny tourist railroads keep their rolling stock funcational without running into Amtrak level maintenance problems.

 

My son volunteers with the Black River & Western in NJ. Their idea of "head end power" is 120VAC single phase running the lights in each car from a portable generator up front with twist-lock connectors between cars. Of course we're talking heavyweight cars with windows that open. What with sealed windows, three-phase HVAC, and on-board cooking equipment, the PPCs are a whole different kettle of fish!


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