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#41 jis

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 10:25 AM

I guess I don;t quite understand your question. Could you provide an example of the "double line" segment that you refer to? Thanks.



#42 greatwestern

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 10:44 AM

The "double" lines on the "walking tube map" which I think you are querying, are in fact the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) [blue] and the London Overground routes [brown]. If you use the "standard" tube map (from the Maps tab on the site www.tfl.gov.uk) you will see the legend defines those routes with double lines. On the standard map you will also see the London Trams and TFL routes defined by double lines.


Edited by greatwestern, 13 December 2017 - 11:02 AM.


#43 caravanman

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 11:10 AM

The lines "key" shown on the walking map is incorrect... I did not notice that myself. The DLR and Overground are shown on the map differently to the "solid" tube lines.

Handy map for walking between stations, but not so great for finding the correct line to ride. :D


Edited by caravanman, 13 December 2017 - 11:11 AM.


#44 willem

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 08:38 PM

I guess I don;t quite understand your question. Could you provide an example of the "double line" segment that you refer to? Thanks.

 

At Stratford, there are double lines (off-green) going in three directions, and a single line (gray) heading southwest (on the schematic). The legend shows no double lines.

 

Did that help?

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#45 trainman74

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 05:03 PM

At Stratford, there are double lines (off-green) going in three directions, and a single line (gray) heading southwest (on the schematic). The legend shows no double lines.
 
Did that help?


It's as caravanman said: the legend is incorrect, and the Docklands Light Railway (greenish-blue) and the Overground (orange) are shown on the map using double lines.

Another issue I see on that excerpt from the map is that the Central Line's red line kind of goes between two of the circles representing Stratford station. But it does stop there!

#46 jis

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 05:55 PM

Yeah, in general only London Underground Lines are shown with solid lines.

 

London Overground (Orange) and DLR (Teal) are shown by those double lines.

 

Stratford is actually fine. It shown the double dark line transfer between three separate stations called Startford, two (London Overground and Central)  of which have stepless access to platform but not to the train, while the third (DLR and Jubilee) one has stepless access to trains. I actually know this to be true since I was there just the other day :)

 

Incidentally Stratford also is a stop on the International HSR (both Eurostar and Southest HSR Commuter Service)



#47 PerRock

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 06:13 PM

Elsewhere on the map it's worth mentioning that the double-lined lime-green is the Trams; Double-Blue is TfL Rail (will be Crossrail/Elizabeth Line); and the Tripple-Red is the cable car.

 

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#48 cirdan

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 05:06 AM

 

At Stratford, there are double lines (off-green) going in three directions, and a single line (gray) heading southwest (on the schematic). The legend shows no double lines.
 
Did that help?


It's as caravanman said: the legend is incorrect, and the Docklands Light Railway (greenish-blue) and the Overground (orange) are shown on the map using double lines.

Another issue I see on that excerpt from the map is that the Central Line's red line kind of goes between two of the circles representing Stratford station. But it does stop there!

 

 

Yes, Central Line stops in Stratford.



#49 cirdan

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 05:07 AM

 

 

Incidentally Stratford also is a stop on the International HSR (both Eurostar and Southest HSR Commuter Service)

 

As far as I am aware, it was intended when the route was designed that Eurostar stops in Stratford, but this doesn't actually happen (although I understand that during the Olympics some specials did stop there)

 

BTW, it was never the intention that Eurostars to / from St Pancras would stop in Stratford. Having two London stops so close together would have made little sense. The purpose of the international platforms at Stratford was that Eurostar trains heading for destinations north of London could use the station to serve London while by-passing the main stations and their approaches. This North of London Eurostar never materialized, largely because of the customs regime that wouldn't allow domestic passengers to use the trains, thus scuppering the business case.. 


Edited by cirdan, 15 December 2017 - 05:15 AM.


#50 jis

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 07:02 AM

Right. Eurostars stop at Ebbsfleet a little further out across the river instead of Stratford these days. Only some, not all stop at Ebbsfleet, as they also do at Ashford International.

One interesting tidbit - for now only the Alstom consists can access Ashford International. The Siemens consists are not equipped with compatible signal/train control system.


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Edited by jis, 15 December 2017 - 08:21 AM.


#51 jamesontheroad

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 03:15 AM

One little addendum on the subject of SIM cards.

It's a lot easier to by a SIM card in the UK that in the USA.
I tried to get a temporary SIM while visiting the USA a few years ago and was surprised how hard it was (presumably to comply with federal requirements about user data).

You can find cheap basic SIM cards for sale at all convenience stores and supermarkets. These will be available for you to activate and load credit onto before use (prepay) and are called "pay as you go" or PAYG plans.

MoneySavingExpert is a great resource for all UK consumers, and this page gives you a low down on current best deals for PAYG SIM cards:

https://www.moneysav...ou-go-sim-cards

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#52 willem

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 10:06 AM

Thanks for that link, jamesontheroad. It has a lot of information that has not concerned me before now.

 

I'm a bit confused and hope you can clarify something for me. Does "available for you to activate and load credit onto" mean that I need to buy the SIM and then buy minutes or data? Or does it mean that I need to activate the SIM (how?) and then load additional credit onto it after I exhaust the initial credit? Put another way, does the SIM come with any credit already on it?

 

Thanks for any education.



#53 Jean

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 07:22 AM

Don’t know how much time you have in London (there is never enough), but I just wanted to mention that St Pancras and Kings Cross stations are worth a visit. They are right next door to each other, but have very different and attractive decors. Apart from the attractive decor of St Pancras, it is interesting to see where the Eurostar departs (maybe you are going on it). Kings Cross also has great decor, trains depart from here to Scotland etc. Kings Cross features in Harry Potter books (if you have young relatives) and you will find the Harry Potter souvenir shop there.

In London I have also enjoyed sitting on the top level of public double decker buses, right at the front if possible. Lots of routes, so there will be one to take you to a tourist site. There are also the tourist hop-on, hop-off buses of course.

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#54 willem

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 10:18 AM

Never enough time in London? Dr Johnson said, "When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life".

 

I believe the train to St Albans leaves from St Pancras, and we do plan on a day trip there. We'll schedule some extra time for station-seeing.

 

I would like to take the train to Inverness, but that probably won't happen. We might make a day trip to Paris. (Thanks to jis for that idea.)

 

And it doesn't take young relatives to spark an interest in Harry Potter. Speaking of which, the Harry Potter Lexicon is a resource for any Harry Potter fan.

 

Thanks for the ideas, Jean.

 



#55 jis

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 10:46 AM

You are welcome willem. Yes a day trip to Paris is well worth it if you can fit it in your budget. Book early to get lower fares, though beware, almost all are non refundable. Rail Europe will happily sell you a reasonably priced insurance that will refund the fare in case of cancellation, no questions asked. I have bought the insurance but never had a chance to exercise it.

 

For maximum time in Paris take the first Eurostar of the day out and the last one back. As soon as you get to Paris get yourself on the Hop-on Hop-off tour bus. That is much easier for someone who is not familiar with the Metro and RER systems.


Edited by jis, 22 December 2017 - 10:53 AM.


#56 cirdan

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 11:28 AM

You are welcome willem. Yes a day trip to Paris is well worth it if you can fit it in your budget. Book early to get lower fares, though beware, almost all are non refundable. Rail Europe will happily sell you a reasonably priced insurance that will refund the fare in case of cancellation, no questions asked. I have bought the insurance but never had a chance to exercise it.

 

For maximum time in Paris take the first Eurostar of the day out and the last one back. As soon as you get to Paris get yourself on the Hop-on Hop-off tour bus. That is much easier for someone who is not familiar with the Metro and RER systems.

 

Alternatively, spend a night in Paris. Hotels there tend to be a shade cheaper than London ones, and it's a city that's well worth seeing at night as well as during the day.

 

And if you consider the Eurostar ride as a railfan attraction in its own right rather than just a convenient means of transportation, there might be arguments for riding it during daylight hours.


Edited by cirdan, 22 December 2017 - 11:31 AM.


#57 jis

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 12:03 PM

Of course you could also spend multiple nights in Paris if you so choose. that goes without saying. If you have even more time (and money) you could do both Paris and Brussels

 

For the moment we were discussing day trips and what you can do in such ;) As a railfan, you can do even a London - Paris - Brussels - London day trip all in daylight even in the winter.






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