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Viewliner bedroom questions


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#1 DKpartyguy

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 12:02 PM

Greetings all,

 

 

I have a couple of quick questions about the viewliner bedrooms.

 

 

First, are they comfortable in terms of space for two adult males, average size?

 

 

Second, how does one climb up onto the upper bunk?

 

 

I viewed the virtual tour on Amtrak's site but I couldn't see any kind of steps or ladder or anything that led up to the top bunk.

 

 

Thanks in advance.

 

 

 

Dave



#2 greatcats

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 12:16 PM

Take a flying leap and pole vault into upper bunk. ( sorry, can’t resist- my old railroad office humor showing. )


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#3 Rail Freak

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 12:20 PM

one foot on lower bunk, other foot on vanity top, butt on top bunk! Easiest way for me!


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#4 StriderGDM

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 12:20 PM

Yes, two adults can fit somewhat comfortably.

 

The way to the upper bunk makes more sense in person. But first, step up on the toilet lid, then on to a small shelf and then you're in.

 

Not to bad if you're at all nimble.



#5 the_traveler

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 12:25 PM

Yes, there is plenty of room. Access to the top bunk in bedrooms in both Viewliners and Superliners is via a removable ladder places on the berth each night by the SCA.
Take it easy .......

Take the train instead and enjoy the ride!

The view is much better at 3 feet than it is at 30,000 feet!

#6 PVD

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 12:26 PM

Bedroom, not roomette...how could they use possibly the toilet or sink lid?


Edited by PVD, 14 November 2017 - 12:29 PM.


#7 the_traveler

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 12:28 PM

one foot on lower bunk, other foot on vanity top, butt on top bunk! Easiest way for me!


Not for a bedroom in a Viewliner. That would be for a Roomette in a Viewliner.
Take it easy .......

Take the train instead and enjoy the ride!

The view is much better at 3 feet than it is at 30,000 feet!

#8 sechs

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 07:22 PM

Yes, there is plenty of room. Access to the top bunk in bedrooms in both Viewliners and Superliners is via a removable ladder places on the berth each night by the SCA.

This is correct.  Tons of room and a ladder that's usually stored on the upper berth when folded away.



#9 Lonestar648

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 12:56 AM

VL Bedroom verses VL Roomette - Bedroom is much larger with two adult size beds with a ladder to the upper.  There is also a bathroom en-suite.  The roomette is 1/2 the size, with a step to get to the upper bunk.  The lower bunk has one's feet by the toilet lid/seat.  This may or may not be ok with your travel mate.  It is NOT acceptable to my granddaughters, hence i can only buy the Bedrooms when they are with me.



#10 JoeBas

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 09:09 AM

So why are we answering a questions about bedrooms with "All about Roomettes" (dear God, not the "great bathroom debate" again)... 

 

OP, plenty of room for 2 full sized adult males in the bedroom, especially if utilizing the upper bunk.  Upper bunk is reached by a removable ladder which the SCA will set up for you when making the beds.  The en-suite bathroom is fully enclosed, and includes a commode and en-suite shower.  



#11 niemi24s

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 10:16 AM

. . . (dear God, not the "great bathroom debate" again)...   

And I'm afraid those debates will become more frequent as those who feel the need to bathe twice a day, who've never lived outside the city, taken a whiz in the woods or used an outhouse become a greater and greater portion of the population.  



#12 choochoodood

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 10:31 AM

The only "bad" thing about the Viewliner bedrooms is that when the bottom bunk is folded out, there's virtually no room to get past it and the abutting sink to get to the entrance door. Not that you would need to since the bathroom is within the bedroom itself. But its a real hassle if for some reason you need to get out while the bottom bunk is in use.



#13 the_traveler

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 11:22 AM

It is exactly the same problem in Superliner bedrooms.
Take it easy .......

Take the train instead and enjoy the ride!

The view is much better at 3 feet than it is at 30,000 feet!

#14 Skyline

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 11:28 AM

 

. . . (dear God, not the "great bathroom debate" again)...   

And I'm afraid those debates will become more frequent as those who feel the need to bathe twice a day, who've never lived outside the city, taken a whiz in the woods or used an outhouse become a greater and greater portion of the population.  

 

 

Exactly right. I look at US passenger rail travel as being somewhat like wilderness backpacking, which I also do. I like both, and I'm quite serious about this.

 

You need to be flexible, adventurous, and open to all the good things and bad things that can happen during either journey. Most of the time, you will look back fondly on the experience even if at the moment you aren't a happy camper when things don't go your way.

 

I know, one is almost free and one costs a lot of money--but the concepts I just stated still apply. Or, you can whine. It's a choice many make. So long as it's not a life-threatening issue, I'll choose to go with the flow.

 

(Ducking . . .)  :mellow:


Edited by Skyline, 15 November 2017 - 11:30 AM.


#15 niemi24s

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 12:40 PM

And while the space between the sink base and lower bunk is not "roomy" in either type of sleeper bedroom, I look upon it as an opportunity to wedge myself firmly in place at the sink.  When the track is rough or a sun kink comes along, it keeps the toothbrush out of my nose or eye.   :blink:



#16 tricia

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 08:09 AM

 

 

. . . (dear God, not the "great bathroom debate" again)...   

And I'm afraid those debates will become more frequent as those who feel the need to bathe twice a day, who've never lived outside the city, taken a whiz in the woods or used an outhouse become a greater and greater portion of the population.  

 

 

Exactly right. I look at US passenger rail travel as being somewhat like wilderness backpacking, which I also do. I like both, and I'm quite serious about this.

 

You need to be flexible, adventurous, and open to all the good things and bad things that can happen during either journey. Most of the time, you will look back fondly on the experience even if at the moment you aren't a happy camper when things don't go your way.

 

I know, one is almost free and one costs a lot of money--but the concepts I just stated still apply. Or, you can whine. It's a choice many make. So long as it's not a life-threatening issue, I'll choose to go with the flow.

 

(Ducking . . .)  :mellow:

 

 

Hope you don't really need to duck.  ^_^

 

Your analogy is apt. They're not exactly the same experience, of course, but similar in enough ways. And thinking this way definitely is a good orientation for having a good trip.

 

Likewise, guests at our remote home here (off grid, heat with firewood, solar hot water, composting toilet) find it luxurious and fun if they think of it as akin to camping--great food and views, out in the woods, far from other humans. Not so luxurious if they're expecting a 4-star hotel.



#17 Manny T

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 11:46 AM

 

 

. . . (dear God, not the "great bathroom debate" again)...   

And I'm afraid those debates will become more frequent as those who feel the need to bathe twice a day, who've never lived outside the city, taken a whiz in the woods or used an outhouse become a greater and greater portion of the population.  

 

 

Exactly right. I look at US passenger rail travel as being somewhat like wilderness backpacking, which I also do. I like both, and I'm quite serious about this.

 

You need to be flexible, adventurous, and open to all the good things and bad things that can happen during either journey. Most of the time, you will look back fondly on the experience even if at the moment you aren't a happy camper when things don't go your way.

 

I know, one is almost free and one costs a lot of money--but the concepts I just stated still apply. Or, you can whine. It's a choice many make. So long as it's not a life-threatening issue, I'll choose to go with the flow.

 

(Ducking . . .)  :mellow:

 

 

Skyline, I enjoyed reading your comment -- because I enjoy receiving different perspectives from different folks -- but my take on the whole experience is just the opposite.

 

Especially when you factor in a bedroom (or roomette), given (1) the cost involved and (2) Amtrak's overstating of the experience. When I pay 5 C's to 1 large for a single night's accommodation--even if it is moving--I don't look back fondly on being unhappy with poor or surly service, lack of comfort, problems with housekeeping (cleanliness), lack of amenities, broken lights, rattling doors, off and on heating, and whatever can (and often does) go wrong on Amtrak.

 

Grin and bear it, ok, but look back fondly? I don't think so.



#18 Skyline

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 11:59 AM

 

 

 

. . . (dear God, not the "great bathroom debate" again)...   

And I'm afraid those debates will become more frequent as those who feel the need to bathe twice a day, who've never lived outside the city, taken a whiz in the woods or used an outhouse become a greater and greater portion of the population.  

 

 

Exactly right. I look at US passenger rail travel as being somewhat like wilderness backpacking, which I also do. I like both, and I'm quite serious about this.

 

You need to be flexible, adventurous, and open to all the good things and bad things that can happen during either journey. Most of the time, you will look back fondly on the experience even if at the moment you aren't a happy camper when things don't go your way.

 

I know, one is almost free and one costs a lot of money--but the concepts I just stated still apply. Or, you can whine. It's a choice many make. So long as it's not a life-threatening issue, I'll choose to go with the flow.

 

(Ducking . . .)  :mellow:

 

 

Hope you don't really need to duck.  ^_^

 

Your analogy is apt. They're not exactly the same experience, of course, but similar in enough ways. And thinking this way definitely is a good orientation for having a good trip.

 

Likewise, guests at our remote home here (off grid, heat with firewood, solar hot water, composting toilet) find it luxurious and fun if they think of it as akin to camping--great food and views, out in the woods, far from other humans. Not so luxurious if they're expecting a 4-star hotel.

 

 

Ha! The only 4-star hotel I've splurged on in the past decade has been a Sleeper Plus bedroom ("cabin for 2") on the Canadian! I guess if I'd splurged for the Prestige Class that would be 5-star? LOL

 

When I did the GA>ME Appalachian Trail (sections, 1996-2003 -- when I finished) we thought a bunk in a hostel's dormitory (during a town visit to resupply food) was luxurious!



#19 Skyline

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 12:13 PM

 

 

 

. . . (dear God, not the "great bathroom debate" again)...   

And I'm afraid those debates will become more frequent as those who feel the need to bathe twice a day, who've never lived outside the city, taken a whiz in the woods or used an outhouse become a greater and greater portion of the population.  

 

 

Exactly right. I look at US passenger rail travel as being somewhat like wilderness backpacking, which I also do. I like both, and I'm quite serious about this.

 

You need to be flexible, adventurous, and open to all the good things and bad things that can happen during either journey. Most of the time, you will look back fondly on the experience even if at the moment you aren't a happy camper when things don't go your way.

 

I know, one is almost free and one costs a lot of money--but the concepts I just stated still apply. Or, you can whine. It's a choice many make. So long as it's not a life-threatening issue, I'll choose to go with the flow.

 

(Ducking . . .)  :mellow:

 

 

Skyline, I enjoyed reading your comment -- because I enjoy receiving different perspectives from different folks -- but my take on the whole experience is just the opposite.

 

Especially when you factor in a bedroom (or roomette), given (1) the cost involved and (2) Amtrak's overstating of the experience. When I pay 5 C's to 1 large for a single night's accommodation--even if it is moving--I don't look back fondly on being unhappy with poor or surly service, lack of comfort, problems with housekeeping (cleanliness), lack of amenities, broken lights, rattling doors, off and on heating, and whatever can (and often does) go wrong on Amtrak.

 

Grin and bear it, ok, but look back fondly? I don't think so.

 

 

I see your point. And when I've been on trains with no heat in the winter or no AC in the summer desert, or that were a half-day late, or with no operable diner so hard boiled eggs were brought on board for breakfast, bustitutions, etc. etc. it was miserable.

 

But years later, the camaraderie that broke out spontaneously on such trips were catalysts for friendships that endure today. We do actually recount these war stories within our circle of friends on board for the "fun," and with others, with a measure of fondness. The fact that we paid for these experiences is never mentioned. YMMV.

 

Thankfully, most of my Amtrak experiences -- starting in 1976 -- have not been that extremely bad. A few have been very good, however -- and most have been at least satisfactory. I find a positive attitude, starting with "The Journey Is The Destination, make the most of it," goes a long way. Again, YMMV.



#20 DKpartyguy

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 03:27 PM

Thanks for all the info guys!

 

 

 

David






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