Jump to content




Help Support AmtrakTrains.com by donating using the link above or becoming a Supporting Member.

Photo

The infamous "11 foot 8 bridge" in Durham, NC


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#1 LookingGlassTie

LookingGlassTie

    Lead Service Attendant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 236 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portsmouth, VA

Posted 07 November 2017 - 10:31 PM

Have any of you been on either the Carolinian or Piedmont trains and witnessed a truck crash at this bridge?   There are numerous YouTube videos which show crashes at the location.  The bridge is at the intersection of S. Gregson & Peabody Streets in Durham.  


"And you know that notion just crossed my mind............"


#2 GaSteve

GaSteve

    OBS Chief

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 425 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Atlanta, GA
  • Interests:More trains !

Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:11 AM

It actually has its own website, but I can't recall the URL.



#3 PRR 60

PRR 60

    Engineer

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,720 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:12 AM

http://11foot8.com/



#4 GaSteve

GaSteve

    OBS Chief

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 425 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Atlanta, GA
  • Interests:More trains !

Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:17 AM

Thanks



#5 Steve4031

Steve4031

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,209 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:Riding Trains Often!!

Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:22 AM

Those crashes are hilarious. I have never seen amtrak crosswise bridge. A few times a freight.


Sent from my iPhone using Amtrak Forum

#6 PRR 60

PRR 60

    Engineer

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,720 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:37 AM

There is more than just signs warning the minimum clearance for that bridge. There is height detection system that triggers a sign warning to turn when an overheight truck approaches.  Even if the driver does not know the height of their truck, the system warns them to not try it.

 

In order to protect the bridge, a superstructure was erected next to the bridge to take the impact of overheight collisions.  That eliminates the need for Norfolk Southern to come out for an inspection every time some numbskull rips the top off their truck.



#7 xyzzy

xyzzy

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,080 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NC

Posted 08 November 2017 - 11:15 AM

Elevating the railway would be astronomically expensive. There are at-grade crossings to the right of the webcam and the recently opened Amtrak station is not far to the left. NCDOT prepared an estimate of elevating the railway -- which is state-owned, remember -- throughout all of downtown Durham, the so-called "Great Wall of Durham" project, but the City asked that the project not be pursued. The line carries a substantial amount of freight, and NS is not keen on a hump. 

 

Digging out the road under the bridge to increase clearance is also problematic because there is a very large sewer just under the asphalt and subgrade. 


Edited by xyzzy, 08 November 2017 - 11:16 AM.


#8 trainman74

trainman74

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,266 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sherman Oaks, CA

Posted 08 November 2017 - 05:41 PM

There is more than just signs warning the minimum clearance for that bridge. There is height detection system that triggers a sign warning to turn when an overheight truck approaches.  Even if the driver does not know the height of their truck, the system warns them to not try it.


And the traffic light now turns red when the height detector is tripped, which is a more recent improvement to the system. A little hard to believe trucks are still hitting it with all that going on, but they're still keeping that website in business.

#9 DSS&A

DSS&A

    Lead Service Attendant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 163 posts

Posted 08 November 2017 - 07:40 PM


 
Digging out the road under the bridge to increase clearance is also problematic because there is a very large sewer just under the asphalt and subgrade. [/quote]

One option would be to install a new bypass sewer line to either side of the bridge and connect it to the old sewer beyond the location of a new lowered road alignment. The existing sewer section under the bridge can then be abandoned allowing the road to be lowered.

#10 SarahZ

SarahZ

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,096 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Reading, writing, baking, local history, urban exploration, music, dancing, and looking for new adventures

Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:14 PM

The train trestle prominently featured in all the videos here has earned a reputation for its unrelenting enforcement of the laws of physics.

 

^_^


Amtrak Miles: 39,318

 

Amtrak Routes: Blue Water, California Zephyr, Capitol Limited, Carl Sandburg, City of New Orleans, Coast Starlight, Crescent, Empire Builder, Hiawatha, Illinois Zephyr, Lincoln Service, Southwest Chief, Texas Eagle, Wolverine

 

Metropolitan Rail: Chicago Metra, Chicago L, Dallas TRE, Detroit People Mover, New Orleans RTA, San Francisco MUNI, Seattle Monorail, South Shore Line (NICTD), Toronto Subway & RT, Washington DC Metro


#11 me_little_me

me_little_me

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,341 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 November 2017 - 09:52 PM

Leadfoot 1. Brain 0.



#12 Steve4031

Steve4031

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,209 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:Riding Trains Often!!

Posted 08 November 2017 - 11:10 PM

Its mostly rental trucks with inexperienced drivers.


Sent from my iPhone using Amtrak Forum

#13 railiner

railiner

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,262 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queens, NY
  • Interests:All public transportation....land, sea, and air

Posted 09 November 2017 - 12:08 AM

Its mostly rental trucks with inexperienced drivers.


Sent from my iPhone using Amtrak Forum

I agree....and some are probably following their GPS on unfamiliar routes, and not seeing the low bridge warnings...

Professional driver's will make sure they have a commercial vehicle GPS, and also make sure they look for hazard's, as well...


metroblue?

okay on the blue!

#14 Thirdrail7

Thirdrail7

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,244 posts

Posted 09 November 2017 - 12:34 PM

I think we have a lot of this going on:

 

 


They say laughter is the best medicine. Obviously they never posted on AU.


#15 JayPea

JayPea

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,552 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colfax, WA (CFX)
  • Interests:Trains, photography, reading. And any combination thereof. :)

Posted 09 November 2017 - 07:05 PM

It never ceases to amaze me how these drivers can keep doing this. In Spokane the BNSF tracks are elevated through the downtown area and trucks are continually getting stuck under them. Advertisements are painted on some of the bridges and on one of them, the bridge that seems to be the one that has the most problems with truck drivers not paying attention, is an ad for a local jewelry store. Every time a truck gets stuck, pictures of it are plastered all over the news and social media. I have to wonder how much business that jewelry store has had generated by virtue of trucks getting stuck under the bridge that has their ad on it. 😂😂😂
Amtrak miles traveled: 85410
Pre-Amtrak miles traveled:8478
Bustitution miles traveled:450
States traveled through on Amtrak: 44

#16 LookingGlassTie

LookingGlassTie

    Lead Service Attendant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 236 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portsmouth, VA

Posted 09 November 2017 - 08:08 PM

I crack up every time I watch videos of trucks hitting that bridge!   And when A/C units get scraped off the tops of RVs.


"And you know that notion just crossed my mind............"


#17 me_little_me

me_little_me

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,341 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 November 2017 - 09:35 PM

The drivers thought going under the track was cooler than going around the gates.



#18 Don Newcomb

Don Newcomb

    Lead Service Attendant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 229 posts

Posted 11 November 2017 - 08:37 AM

The problem on the Mississippi Gulf Coast is that every time CSX services the tracks they add an inch or two of ballast, raising the tracks and crossing. Many of our grade-level crossings are now impassible to vehicles with low ground-clearance. Unfortunately, there's no quick and easy formula (e.g. 11'8") to know if you can make it or not and many low-boy trailers get stuck. 



#19 railiner

railiner

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,262 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queens, NY
  • Interests:All public transportation....land, sea, and air

Posted 11 November 2017 - 11:32 AM

The problem on the Mississippi Gulf Coast is that every time CSX services the tracks they add an inch or two of ballast, raising the tracks and crossing. Many of our grade-level crossings are now impassible to vehicles with low ground-clearance. Unfortunately, there's no quick and easy formula (e.g. 11'8") to know if you can make it or not and many low-boy trailers get stuck. 

That is a failure of inter-agency coordination...the railroads and the highway departments....such projects should have their engineer's approve together such changes, so that appropriate 'counter measure's' can be taken to prevent poor crossing geometry...


metroblue?

okay on the blue!

#20 DSS&A

DSS&A

    Lead Service Attendant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 163 posts

Posted 11 November 2017 - 03:00 PM

Yes, the humps on the roads getting too high is a failure of the state agency that approved the grade crossing work. They should either require the railroad to undercut their track or require more road pavement raising adjacent to the grade crossing.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users