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Meeting my new love - The Boeing 777


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#141 jis

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 07:15 PM

See PM for details


Edited by jis, 28 November 2017 - 07:23 PM.


#142 saxman

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 11:07 PM

Capt 57, possibly this is a matter not to be addressed at a public forum, but I've always wondered if a loaded for takeoff 72 or 3, was right at V1, and lost an engine, could it still do so and gain enough altitude to safely return?

 

V1 is the the speed every flight is predicated on. As long as the aircraft is below a certain calculated weight for any particular runway the aircraft can loose an engine at its worst possible moment, V1, and still climb on a single engine to clear the opposite end of the runway by at least 35 feet. It's also designed to clear any obstacles beyond the runway and climb to a safe altitude on one engine. 

 

V1 is takeoff decision speed. During the takeoff roll if any engines fail or other emergency arises we can abort the takeoff and still have enough runway to stop if it happens before that V1 speed. If we've gone past that speed, it's a go no matter what. So we practice loosing and engine right after V1 and continuing the climb out in the simulator, known as "V1 Cuts." This is something I'll be practicing tomorrow and the next day in my new aircraft, the Embraer-175.


Edited by saxman, 28 November 2017 - 11:08 PM.

Amtrak Miles: 203,395 (as of 9/21/16)

#143 B757Guy

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 06:42 AM

 

Capt 57, possibly this is a matter not to be addressed at a public forum, but I've always wondered if a loaded for takeoff 72 or 3, was right at V1, and lost an engine, could it still do so and gain enough altitude to safely return?

 

V1 is the the speed every flight is predicated on. As long as the aircraft is below a certain calculated weight for any particular runway the aircraft can loose an engine at its worst possible moment, V1, and still climb on a single engine to clear the opposite end of the runway by at least 35 feet. It's also designed to clear any obstacles beyond the runway and climb to a safe altitude on one engine. 

 

V1 is takeoff decision speed. During the takeoff roll if any engines fail or other emergency arises we can abort the takeoff and still have enough runway to stop if it happens before that V1 speed. If we've gone past that speed, it's a go no matter what. So we practice loosing and engine right after V1 and continuing the climb out in the simulator, known as "V1 Cuts." This is something I'll be practicing tomorrow and the next day in my new aircraft, the Embraer-175.

 

 

Congrats on the upgrade to the 175!


I'm an airline pilot with a major US based carrier, and avid lover of trains since the very early days of Amtrak. I fondly recall GG1's zipping along the NEC, and sleeping in a slumbercoach on the Montrealer as a kid. I miss the old heritage cars, the GG1 and the original Budd Metroliners. The new equipment today simply doesn't have the same personality and elegance...


#144 Devil's Advocate

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 02:11 AM

Happy to answer any 777 or 757/767 questions. Fire away!


Was there a specific incident or event that brought the 757 under the "heavy" class designation? Do you believe the 757 and 767 would have featured substantially increased efficiency and operational flexibility (at the expense of crew commonality) if they were designed independently without sharing resources and design decisions during active development?  Can a 777 measure its weight while on the ground?  How much does a 777's satellite communication dome impact fuel consumption?  If a 757 passenger aircraft suffers a fault that prevents it from depressurizing and I attempt to open one of the plug doors after the aircraft has landed what happens? Let's assume the flight reached FL350 before the fault occurred, we landed near sea level, the door is disarmed, and I have infinite leverage to bear on the door handle.


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#145 B757Guy

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 08:16 AM

Typically, the FAA designates any aircraft with a Max Takeoff Weight (MTOW) of 300,000lbs or greater as a "heavy" due to the wake turbulence they generate. The 757 is unique, in that it it's MTOW is around 256,000lbs, But, a series of incidents with smaller aircraft, that unfortunately crashed after encountering a 757's wake, caused the FAA to designate the 757 as a "heavy" so as to ensure proper separation. 

 

With regards to the 757 and 767 being developed separately, I think it's best to look at the state of the industry when the 757 especially was being developed. It was designed to replace the 727, and with regards to that mission, it was a success. The 767 was Boeing's first CRT/2 person aircraft, and was also a direct response to Airbus and their A300. Collectively, over 2000 of the types were built, and are considered a success. Both provided technologies and design elements that led to the 787 and 777. 

 

The 777 FMC like any Boeing, afaik, needs the ZFW (zero fuel weight)  manually entered or uplinked. Then it knows the fuel weight so then it knows it’s actual weight. With regards to the SAT dome fuel question. I actually have no idea! I'd have to look at the engineering manuals.


I'm an airline pilot with a major US based carrier, and avid lover of trains since the very early days of Amtrak. I fondly recall GG1's zipping along the NEC, and sleeping in a slumbercoach on the Montrealer as a kid. I miss the old heritage cars, the GG1 and the original Budd Metroliners. The new equipment today simply doesn't have the same personality and elegance...


#146 Devil's Advocate

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Posted 08 December 2017 - 01:59 AM

Thank you for your answers. I kept hoping you'd eventually remark on the pressurized plug door manipulation inquiry. For most of my life I believed it was virtually impossible to open a plug door while the cabin was still pressurized. My understanding was that even if you were infinitely strong you'd simply end up breaking the door's massive handle long before you could force the rest of the mechanism to actuate. But I've also heard there have been instances of defective depressurization valves leading to staff being thrown out onto the tarmac after operating the door of an unintentionally pressurized cabin. That seems to throw a bit of a monkey wrench into the original understanding, and leaves me wondering if the critical factor is that the cabin was not fully pressurized or that it didn't have any fast moving air mass along the outer skin.


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#147 fanjet

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 12:40 AM

Hi B757Guy
Congrats on your upgrade to the B777.
Having recently retired from aircraft maintenance, I would have to say that the triple was my favorite plane to work on. I was a technician until June, 2001 & then went to work in maintenance planning.



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#148 XHRTSP

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 07:29 AM

 

I doubt that's going away any time soon.  CPDLC in the US for enroute purposes is probably going to take a little while longer.  Even in Europe you still have to check in between centers regardless of CPDLC login status.

I wasn't aware of this new technology....(I just Googled it)....sort of an expansion of ACARS, eh?

 

 

I'm not 100% on the nuts and bolts, but that'd be like saying text messaging is an expansion of email.  From just a flat out user perspective, in can kind of appear that that is the case. 

 

Our interaction with ATC via ACARS is basically limited to retrieving ATIS and our departure clearance at participating airports, and retrieving our oceanic clearance before crossing the North Atlantic.  Most ACARS functions involve communicating with the company.

 

CPDLC essentially replaces talking over the radio with ATC.  They can give us frequency changes, headings, altitude changes, direct to fixes, reroutes, a warning that a North Korean ballistic missile was heading in our direction, etc.  And we too can communicate back with them.  This is especially useful over the water where otherwise we'd have to talk over varying qualities of HF frequencies.   



#149 railiner

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 09:55 PM

Thanks for that explanation....so you still use HF over the ocean, and not satcom voice?


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#150 XHRTSP

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 08:58 AM

Thanks for that explanation....so you still use HF over the ocean, and not satcom voice?

 

Before coast out we will tune up the appropriate facility on HF and ensure we can establish comms with them.  If one of our two HF radios is deferred, then the procedure would be to use the sat phone as a backup.  In addition to the HF check, we would need to dial up the facility and make sure they have our phone number and we can make calls both ways.



#151 Devil's Advocate

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 10:38 AM

Thanks for the information XHRTSP.  Do satellite phones sound any clearer than conventional high frequency radio transmissions?  I've always wondered why it seems little has been done to improve the audio clarity of aircraft communications.  Most if not all of my personal audio sources have improved substantially over my lifetime while commercial truck and aircraft communications still sound much as they did the very first time I heard them.


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#152 railiner

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 01:07 PM

 

Thanks for that explanation....so you still use HF over the ocean, and not satcom voice?

 

Before coast out we will tune up the appropriate facility on HF and ensure we can establish comms with them.  If one of our two HF radios is deferred, then the procedure would be to use the sat phone as a backup.  In addition to the HF check, we would need to dial up the facility and make sure they have our phone number and we can make calls both ways.

 

Thanks again for that response...


metroblue?

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#153 railiner

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 01:13 PM

Thanks for the information XHRTSP.  Do satellite phones sound any clearer than conventional high frequency radio transmissions?  I've always wondered why it seems little has been done to improve the audio clarity of aircraft communications.  Most if not all of my personal audio sources have improved substantially over my lifetime while commercial truck and aircraft communications still sound much as they did the very first time I heard them.

I am by no means an expert on communications, always like to learn more....

I do think part of the sound quality is due to aircraft using AM rather than FM due to other properties...otoh, railroads use FM in the VHF band

Not sure about what truck communications you are referring to, but if it's Citizen Band...that also uses AM, with its sound limitations, (not to mention interference issues)....


metroblue?

okay on the blue!

#154 ehbowen

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 06:11 PM

Although they have added channels (by slicing the frequency allocations of pre-existing channels), a tube-and-crystal radio from the 1940s would still "work" in todays ATC environment (as long as you had exactly the right crystals). While, technically speaking, the system is indeed due for an overhaul from the ground up (pardon the pun), any sweeping structural changes are going to be met by stiff resistance from aircraft owners, especially those who only operate part-time or in VFR conditions. Aircraft radios Are Not Cheap.


Edited by ehbowen, 21 December 2017 - 06:11 PM.

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#155 Blackwolf

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 12:00 PM

 Aircraft radios Are Not Cheap.

Aircraft ANYTHING is not cheap!


Amtrak
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Ocean (x4); Windsor Corridor (x2); The Canadian (x1)


#156 ehbowen

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 05:50 PM

 

 Aircraft radios Are Not Cheap.

Aircraft ANYTHING is not cheap!

 

 

Definite +1 to that!


broadside-1.jpg 16 inch Armor Piercing...When you care enough to send the very, VERY best!
Visit Streamliner Schedules - Historic timetables from the Streamliner era.





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