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Meeting my new love - The Boeing 777


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#21 railiner

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 04:48 PM

Flew in and out of some neat places like Hayden, Eagle, Montrose, and Gunnison, Co.; and Jackson, Wy., on AA 757's. The pilots called them "Hot Rods". :)
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#22 Devil's Advocate

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 05:08 PM

Well thanks for pissing in my cheerios! :) Although I am with you on the MD-11, it was a sweet plane, but [] a squirrely beast to land at times! I've got 300 hours in the MD-11 as an FO, way back when, and while I loved it, it could be a challenge to land, especially in a crosswind.

 

Sorry about that. ^_^  The honest truth is that I'm slightly envious of commercial pilots. You have a career that is more interesting and respected among laymen and is probably a lot more fun once you’re past the initial training/rating/proving stages. That being said, if I was a commercial pilot myself I’d probably be a lot more stressed and a lot more burned out on travel in general.  The only DC-10's and MD-11's we receive now are from FedEx (freight) and UPS (maintenance).  Once upon a time Northwest sent their DC-10's here for D-checks but that feels like ages ago now.

 

Yep, the DC-9 was one heck of a climber, especially the Series 20 variant, which was often times called the DC-9 Sport. The 757 is a great climber too. I've had the opportunity to fly a few empties for re-positioning, and have gotten 4700 FPM and a 22 degree nose up pitch angle at times! It was a blast!


I'm not entirely sure which version it was. I always forget to check the door plate and prior to that flight I never would have assumed a DC-9 was anything special anyway. I suppose I could have asked the staff for details but that flight was shortly after 9-11 and people were getting really weird about anything that sounded like technical questions.  Actually, they're almost as weird about it today as they were a decade ago.  I thought about starting a log book to document my travels but then I thought about trying to explain such a thing to a flight attendant or TSA agent and I lost all interest.


We've got provisions and lots of beer. The key word is survival on the new frontier. 


#23 B757Guy

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 05:31 PM

No worries my friend, and thank you for the comments. I wouldn't worry about TSA or a flight attendant giving you grief over a logbook. I've had passengers that collect tail numbers literally come on board with binoculars to spot other planes while we taxi. That one did get a FA upset, but we worked it out with no issue.

 

Are you an A&P?? Work in aviation? 


I'm an airline pilot with a major US based carrier, and avid lover of trains since the very early days of Amtrak. I fondly recall GG1's zipping along the NEC, and sleeping in a slumbercoach on the Montrealer as a kid. I miss the old heritage cars, the GG1 and the original Budd Metroliners. The new equipment today simply doesn't have the same personality and elegance...


#24 BCL

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 07:13 PM

 

 

Meeting my new love - The Boeing 777

 

Um...

 

I fondly recall GG1's zipping along the NEC, and sleeping in a slumbercoach on the Montrealer as a kid. I miss the old heritage cars, the GG1 and the original Budd Metroliners. The new equipment today simply doesn't have the same personality and elegance...

 

There is no disputing that the 777 has an impressive technical design and best-in-class operational record.  It's one of the safest, most successful, and longest range commercial passenger aircraft ever built.  But when I look at a 777 from the boarding gate I see very little personality or elegance.  In fact it looks little different than a 767 on steroids.  Which itself looks similar to a fattened up 737.  I miss the days of L-1011's, DC-10's/MD-11's, and 727's in routine passenger service.  The end of the 747 passenger era appears to be quickly approaching as well.  The A340 line is already dead and if the A380 line continues its present course toward accelerated obsolescence it won't be long before we are stuck with legions of barely distinguishable twins employed in nearly every role and purpose.  The original design for the 787 was actually kind of amazing.  Unfortunately after it underwent manufacturing and maintenance standardizing revisions it looked just like any other twin. :(

 

Well thanks for pissing in my cheerios! :) Although I am with you on the MD-11, it was a sweet plane, but an a squirrely beast to land at times! I've got 300 hours in the MD-11 as an FO, way back when, and while I loved it, it could be a challenge to land, especially in a crosswind.

 

 

The only time I've ever been in first class was on an MD-11.  I do remember taking my kid to an airshow at an Air Force base where we did a tour of a KC-10 and my 3 year old kid got to be at the controls along with a photo with a pilot (who might have been younger than the plane).  What was really odd was someone else touring the plane who claimed to be a flight attendant.  She looked at the coffee maker and said it was the same as the kind she used on MD-11s and DC-10s.

 

Isn't getting rated for a 787 just a little bit more work once you're rated on the 777?

 

I guess the next thing you'll be working on is Airbus and getting used to stick controls.


Edited by BCL, 02 August 2017 - 07:50 PM.


#25 Devil's Advocate

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 08:13 PM

No worries my friend, and thank you for the comments. I wouldn't worry about TSA or a flight attendant giving you grief over a logbook. I've had passengers that collect tail numbers literally come on board with binoculars to spot other planes while we taxi. That one did get a FA upset, but we worked it out with no issue. Are you an A&P?? Work in aviation? 

 

My work has nothing to do with aviation of any sort unfortunately.  When I say "we" I just mean the local airport (KSAT) and maintenance areas.  My job is in technical support and sysadmin work.  I just happen to find commercial flying and aircraft design/operation interesting topics.  When I was a little boy I loved flying despite knowing next to nothing about how it actually worked.  Over time my passion for flying dimmed and waned as other interests began to dominate my life.  Many years later I got a job working in a building overlooking the airport and something about that experience rekindled my interest.  I've been watching planes and following the industry ever since.  There's a comedian named Bill Burr who talks about flying helicopters as a hobby on his podcast, and although I have no interest in helicopters he keeps reminding me that I need to look into a private pilot license before I get too old to make it happen.


Edited by Devil's Advocate, 02 August 2017 - 08:17 PM.

We've got provisions and lots of beer. The key word is survival on the new frontier. 


#26 B757Guy

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 08:58 PM

 

No worries my friend, and thank you for the comments. I wouldn't worry about TSA or a flight attendant giving you grief over a logbook. I've had passengers that collect tail numbers literally come on board with binoculars to spot other planes while we taxi. That one did get a FA upset, but we worked it out with no issue. Are you an A&P?? Work in aviation? 

 

My work has nothing to do with aviation of any sort unfortunately.  When I say "we" I just mean the local airport (KSAT) and maintenance areas.  My job is in technical support and sysadmin work.  I just happen to find commercial flying and aircraft design/operation interesting topics.  When I was a little boy I loved flying despite knowing next to nothing about how it actually worked.  Over time my passion for flying dimmed and waned as other interests began to dominate my life.  Many years later I got a job working in a building overlooking the airport and something about that experience rekindled my interest.  I've been watching planes and following the industry ever since.  There's a comedian named Bill Burr who talks about flying helicopters as a hobby on his podcast, and although I have no interest in helicopters he keeps reminding me that I need to look into a private pilot license before I get too old to make it happen.

 

 

I hope you do. If you were in NJ, I'd take you flying!


I'm an airline pilot with a major US based carrier, and avid lover of trains since the very early days of Amtrak. I fondly recall GG1's zipping along the NEC, and sleeping in a slumbercoach on the Montrealer as a kid. I miss the old heritage cars, the GG1 and the original Budd Metroliners. The new equipment today simply doesn't have the same personality and elegance...


#27 gswager

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 11:40 PM

Interesting discussion! As far as I remember which airplanes I've flown- Lockheed 1011(?), 737, 757, 6 seat Cessna, sailplane (it's really awesome and I thought about taking class but never got a chance 😞), varieties of Bombadiers (Skywest), Folkiers (AA and Continental), 19 seat props by Mesa airline, another tiny prop by Horizon between Boise and Twin Falls, ID, 32 seat props (made in Brazil?) by Skywest prior being replaced by Bombadiers, and some more I can't remember. Oh, add one of Airbus fleet. It's like naming the cars and trucks over the years!
Entire length in segments- Southwest Chief (LSV-LAX & CHI-LSV), Pacific Surfliner (SLO-LAX & LAX-SAN) & San Joaquin (Oakland stub)
Entire length, end to end- Lake Shore Limited (Boston stub) (11/09), Downeaster (11/09) & Coast Starlight (10/11)
Partial- California Zephyr (SLC-EMY), Hiawatha, Cascades (SEA-PDX) & Acela (BOS-PVD)

#28 BCL

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 12:00 AM

Interesting discussion! As far as I remember which airplanes I've flown- Lockheed 1011(?), 737, 757, 6 seat Cessna, sailplane (it's really awesome and I thought about taking class but never got a chance ), varieties of Bombadiers (Skywest), Folkiers (AA and Continental), 19 seat props by Mesa airline, another tiny prop by Horizon between Boise and Twin Falls, ID, 32 seat props (made in Brazil?) by Skywest prior being replaced by Bombadiers, and some more I can't remember. Oh, add one of Airbus fleet. It's like naming the cars and trucks over the years!

 

No Embraers?


Edited by BCL, 03 August 2017 - 12:01 AM.


#29 railiner

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 01:40 AM

 

 

 

The only time I've ever been in first class was on an MD-11.  I do remember taking my kid to an airshow at an Air Force base where we did a tour of a KC-10 and my 3 year old kid got to be at the controls along with a photo with a pilot (who might have been younger than the plane).  What was really odd was someone else touring the plane who claimed to be a flight attendant.  She looked at the coffee maker and said it was the same as the kind she used on MD-11s and DC-10s.

 

 

I recall the Amfleet cafe's as having the exact same Grimes coffee makers as you'd see in most airliner galley's...not sure what they use nowadays.... 

 

As for KC-10's...I had a friend who retired flying them for the USAF, and then scored a job with UAL as a DC-10 simulator instructor at the old Stapleton Field in Denver.   For years I teased him about taking me for a "flight" in one.   Finally, just before he retired from UAL, he took me in after hours, and told me he could not operate the full motion, as it was too costly, but did let me do one IFR take off and landing from 35 Left, and back on 26 Left....

Let me tell you...even though it was just a simulator, and he talked me thru the whole 'flight'...I was sweating profusely like it was the real thing..... :cool:


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#30 BCL

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 12:07 PM

 

 

 

 

The only time I've ever been in first class was on an MD-11.  I do remember taking my kid to an airshow at an Air Force base where we did a tour of a KC-10 and my 3 year old kid got to be at the controls along with a photo with a pilot (who might have been younger than the plane).  What was really odd was someone else touring the plane who claimed to be a flight attendant.  She looked at the coffee maker and said it was the same as the kind she used on MD-11s and DC-10s.

 

 

I recall the Amfleet cafe's as having the exact same Grimes coffee makers as you'd see in most airliner galley's...not sure what they use nowadays.... 

 

As for KC-10's...I had a friend who retired flying them for the USAF, and then scored a job with UAL as a DC-10 simulator instructor at the old Stapleton Field in Denver.   For years I teased him about taking me for a "flight" in one.   Finally, just before he retired from UAL, he took me in after hours, and told me he could not operate the full motion, as it was too costly, but did let me do one IFR take off and landing from 35 Left, and back on 26 Left....

Let me tell you...even though it was just a simulator, and he talked me thru the whole 'flight'...I was sweating profusely like it was the real thing..... :cool:

 

 

The coffee maker was of course this modular stainless steel box that slid into a slot in the galley.  It was kind of old looking like it was designed in the 60s.  And in the US Air Force they have uniformed personnel who are essentially just flight attendants.  I've mostly heard of the VIP transports (like Air Force One and the ones used to transport Cabinet Secretaries and Congressional delegations) but I think even the tanker/transports get flight attendants since the passengers/crew still need to eat on long flights.  The one we toured was set up at least 30 seats, although I think they can arrange seating as needed or even place seating in the entire cargo area if they need to move people.

 

I was taking photos so I didn't slide into the cockpit seats.  That thing had all those ancient dials and switches everywhere.  I'm not sure how flying a plane like that translates to a modern plane with a glass cockpit.  I sat in the cockpit of a Civil Air Patrol Cessna 172, and that cockpit was more modern than the KC-10.

 

I did get to sit in at the refueling boom controls.



#31 B757Guy

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 12:54 PM

I flew the F-111 in the Air Force, and the variant I flew was still mostly analog. The conversion to MFD's and glass in the F16 was actually not that difficult, and a welcomed upgrade! I love the glass flightdeck we have in the 757/767, as it reduced our workload and allowed us better situational awareness. The 777 ups that another notch, which is fantastic. Still, I love flying my 1986 Beechcraft with it's steam gauges and HSI, but do use Foreflight on my iPad too! 


Edited by B757Guy, 03 August 2017 - 12:57 PM.

I'm an airline pilot with a major US based carrier, and avid lover of trains since the very early days of Amtrak. I fondly recall GG1's zipping along the NEC, and sleeping in a slumbercoach on the Montrealer as a kid. I miss the old heritage cars, the GG1 and the original Budd Metroliners. The new equipment today simply doesn't have the same personality and elegance...


#32 jis

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 01:02 PM

Some of the older planes that I have flown in back in the '60s included such famous types as the Caravelle, the Viscount, the Lockheed Super Constellation, the Lockheed Electra, the BAC-111, the Vickers Super VC-10. Somehow I missed getting on any of the Convairs. I guess my age is showing :P



#33 ehbowen

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 01:55 PM

When I was a little boy I loved flying despite knowing next to nothing about how it actually worked.  Over time my passion for flying dimmed and waned as other interests began to dominate my life....he keeps reminding me that I need to look into a private pilot license before I get too old to make it happen.


Do it. I had wanted to learn to fly from childhood. Finally, at age 34, I started taking lessons at Fletcher Aviation while I had an HVAC maintenance job at KHOU. Get a paycheck, take a lesson. Took me exactly one year to earn my private ticket; I soloed and took my check ride in a Super Decathlon. My checkride prep was spins and recovery, under the hood, at night.

I was an active pilot for one year and was working on commercial and instrument tickets. The very next summer, the doctor put me on one of the FAA's prohibited medications and I lost my medical. I've been grounded ever since. Don't put it off.

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#34 gswager

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 02:02 PM

 
No Embraers?

That's it! It's Embraers. Thanks BCL!

Beechcraft is pretty comfortable props due to high head clearance in aisle.

Edited by gswager, 03 August 2017 - 02:05 PM.

Entire length in segments- Southwest Chief (LSV-LAX & CHI-LSV), Pacific Surfliner (SLO-LAX & LAX-SAN) & San Joaquin (Oakland stub)
Entire length, end to end- Lake Shore Limited (Boston stub) (11/09), Downeaster (11/09) & Coast Starlight (10/11)
Partial- California Zephyr (SLC-EMY), Hiawatha, Cascades (SEA-PDX) & Acela (BOS-PVD)

#35 Bob Dylan

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 02:43 PM

Did you miss out on the joys of the Gooney Bird ( aka DC-3) also jis?

I flew alot on Braniff and TTA( we called it Tree Top Airlines!😄)when they still flew DC-3s and Convairs.

I also got to ride on the Concorde when Air France had a working agreement with Braniff, and flew Sub-Sonic from Dallas to Mexico City! Very uncomfortable plane due to the lack of room in the cabin!😣

My age is showing for sure!😋😄

Edited by Bob Dylan, 03 August 2017 - 02:46 PM.

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Yet there isn't a train I wouldn't take,No matter where its going!.." -Edna St. Vincent Millay

#36 jis

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 03:32 PM

I have been in a Dakota (DC-3) but never flown in one.

#37 Swadian Hardcore

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 05:03 PM

I'm taking an AA domestic 757 (75W) into New York next week. Only 8 of them left. Maybe it still has the old Eisenhower interior. I got a window seat, too.

 

Do you get common type rating with the 787 as well?


Edited by Swadian Hardcore, 03 August 2017 - 05:04 PM.

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#38 railiner

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 05:09 PM

I went for a "fantrip" aboard PBA's famous DC-3, N136PB....at the time it held the world's record for highest time airliner..

I also had the extreme good fortune to fly on BA's Concorde from LHR to JFK....amazing that the world's fastest airliner still had "steam gauges" and a flight engineer.  The bird that I flew on was G-BOAD...the one now on display at the Intrepid Sea Air and Space Museum.


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#39 B757Guy

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 05:21 PM

I'm taking an AA domestic 757 (75W) into New York next week. Only 8 of them left. Maybe it still has the old Eisenhower interior. I got a window seat, too.

 

Do you get common type rating with the 787 as well?

 

I believe in Europe it is a common type rating, but the FAA issues separate type ratings for both, here in the US,  which appear on an Airman's Certificate. 


I'm an airline pilot with a major US based carrier, and avid lover of trains since the very early days of Amtrak. I fondly recall GG1's zipping along the NEC, and sleeping in a slumbercoach on the Montrealer as a kid. I miss the old heritage cars, the GG1 and the original Budd Metroliners. The new equipment today simply doesn't have the same personality and elegance...


#40 BCL

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 11:51 PM

I flew the F-111 in the Air Force, and the variant I flew was still mostly analog. The conversion to MFD's and glass in the F16 was actually not that difficult, and a welcomed upgrade! I love the glass flightdeck we have in the 757/767, as it reduced our workload and allowed us better situational awareness. The 777 ups that another notch, which is fantastic. Still, I love flying my 1986 Beechcraft with it's steam gauges and HSI, but do use Foreflight on my iPad too! 

 

All I remember about the F-111 was that the F-111B variant turned out to be a disaster.






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