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India High Speed Rail project order trainsets


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#21 cirdan

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 07:52 AM

Seeing it takes longer to build a new line than build a new train, and taking into account the situation in India with squatters being able to mount a legal battle that could lead to endless nimby lawsuits, and seeing that on account of their gauge the new trains cannot even be used on existing lines during a transitional period, is it not strange that the ordering of trains is apparently seeing a level of urgency that land acquisiting and construction isn't.



#22 jis

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 07:59 AM

Seeing it takes longer to build a new line than build a new train, and taking into account the situation in India with squatters being able to mount a legal battle that could lead to endless nimby lawsuits, and seeing that on account of their gauge the new trains cannot even be used on existing lines during a transitional period, is it not strange that the ordering of trains is apparently seeing a level of urgency that land acquisiting and construction isn't.

That is mainly because the way it is being designed, land acquisition is being kept to a minimum. In urban areas it is all going to be in bored tunnels, and some on elevated structures on land that is already owned by the railways. In rural areas it will mostly be on elevated structures. There will be very little on ground.

 

Having said that, yeah they might have some problems, but typically land acquisition in India is not as much a legal problems a political one. Mysteriously, if the local political leaders are on board there typically is very little land acquisition problem from squatters. Somehow the local political leaders figure out a way to dispatch the squatters elsewhere. The wheels of justice indeed turn in strange ways sometimes.



#23 cirdan

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 08:04 AM

 

Seeing it takes longer to build a new line than build a new train, and taking into account the situation in India with squatters being able to mount a legal battle that could lead to endless nimby lawsuits, and seeing that on account of their gauge the new trains cannot even be used on existing lines during a transitional period, is it not strange that the ordering of trains is apparently seeing a level of urgency that land acquisiting and construction isn't.

That is mainly because the way it is being designed, land acquisition is being kept to a minimum. In urban areas it is all going to be in bored tunnels, and some on elevated structures on land that is already owned by the railways. In rural areas it will mostly be on elevated structures. There will be very little on ground.

 

Having said that, yeah they might have some problems, but typically land acquisition in India is not as much a legal problems a political one. Mysteriously, if the local political leaders are on board there typically is very little land acquisition problem from squatters. Somehow the local political leaders figure out a way to dispatch the squatters elsewhere. The wheels of justice indeed turn in strange ways sometimes.

 

 

Does this mean that construction is actually in hand, at least on some segments?

 

Tunnels avoid conflicts with land usage, but they also take a long time to build. All the more reason to prioritize construction work over new trains.



#24 jis

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 08:15 AM

AFAICT, they are in the process of acquiring the necessary boring machines for the Mumbai segments, as we speak. it is mostly tunneling through muck, with just small bits of tunneling through rocks. India has considerable experience in both. They just finished tunneling under the Hooghly River in Kolkata for Metro Line 2 - the East-West Corridor. And once they got going, it took them just 6 months to complete the tunneling work.

 

Ah yes, they had a lot of land acquisition problems. but that is because of the completely crazy political situation around Kolkata, with a half crazy Chief Minister of West Bengal in Writers Building (the seat of West Bengal Government) too.



#25 cirdan

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 08:35 AM

Thanks






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