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How can Amtrak improve accessibility?


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#21 PVD

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 07:47 AM

That ridiculous system at CUS may actually be a METRA creation not Amtrak, but either way I can't see how it helps. Probably confuses more people than it helps. 



#22 me_little_me

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 05:23 PM

With the Chicago Union Station track numbers and announcements for the blind, I believe modern practice is to use a (very short-range) induction loop which can be heard by blind people with the right equipment, and also tactile indicators.  The overlapping announcments can't possibly be effective...

Huh? First I've heard of blind people using induction devices to hear. Unless they are also hard of hearing, they should be able to hear anything a sighted person does. On the other hand, those of us who are hard of hearing often benefit from induction devices that communicate electronically to our hearing aids bypassing the microphones thus depressing the volume of external noise and increasing the clarity of the desired sounds.



#23 AmtrakBlue

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 07:07 PM

 

With the Chicago Union Station track numbers and announcements for the blind, I believe modern practice is to use a (very short-range) induction loop which can be heard by blind people with the right equipment, and also tactile indicators.  The overlapping announcments can't possibly be effective...

Huh? First I've heard of blind people using induction devices to hear. Unless they are also hard of hearing, they should be able to hear anything a sighted person does. On the other hand, those of us who are hard of hearing often benefit from induction devices that communicate electronically to our hearing aids bypassing the microphones thus depressing the volume of external noise and increasing the clarity of the desired sounds.

 

Sounds like the stories I've heard where the deaf are handed brille menus at fast food places and restaurants.  That has not happened to me ... yet.


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#24 neroden

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Posted 07 December 2016 - 08:01 AM

 

With the Chicago Union Station track numbers and announcements for the blind, I believe modern practice is to use a (very short-range) induction loop which can be heard by blind people with the right equipment, and also tactile indicators.  The overlapping announcments can't possibly be effective...

Huh? First I've heard of blind people using induction devices to hear.

 

Museums.  Exhibits which rely heavily on visuals often have audio explanations as accompaniment, but they don't want to bother the regular visitors with a cacophony of sound, so they set up induction loops and hand out the equipment to anyone who asks for it at the front desk.  This was actually my first introduction to induction loops.


Edited by neroden, 07 December 2016 - 08:01 AM.

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#25 PVD

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Posted 07 December 2016 - 08:10 AM

I first experienced those at the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix, AZ and they worked very well. When you stood in front of an exhibit that had video, you only heard the music and narration from that screen. 



#26 CHamilton

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 12:04 PM

Have others who have used the H-room experienced these issues? I'll be happy to forward your comments to NARP. http://www.heraldnet...-inappropriate/


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#27 PVD

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 12:29 PM

One problem often seen in designing for "accessibility" is that one persons benefit can be the opposite for someone else. One size does not fit all. Toilets set low to facilitate chair transfer can be a nightmare for someone post broken hip. The extra space to the side that allows someone to put a chair alongside can preclude someone from reaching grab bars to stand up. 



#28 Just-Thinking-51

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 10:43 PM

One problem often seen in designing for "accessibility" is that one persons benefit can be the opposite for someone else. One size does not fit all. Toilets set low to facilitate chair transfer can be a nightmare for someone post broken hip. The extra space to the side that allows someone to put a chair alongside can preclude someone from reaching grab bars to stand up. 

+1

As someone who is not disable per say. My height does cause problems. Local grocery store relocated my type of cereal to the lowest self. Nothing like have to lie on the floor to reach the boxes in back. When use a toilet I seek out the higher seats, easier on the knees to get up. One size does not fit all. However you do need to have standardization. You can not design to meet everyone needs, the railcars are not that big.

The "H" room on the Viewliner 2, has been redesigned several times per Amtrak and is "A nightmare".

It's too bad we don't have a good set of standards to design around. At Denver this year riding the transit system I so saw a couple of super sized power chairs, they would never fit on a Amtrak train. I was impressed with both the operators. One was out with coffee in "hand". The other look independent but probably should of had a aid with her. I really love see that these two were doing the same thing that I was. That how it should be.


Motion to require the track gauge to be change to seven feet between the rail. Anyone to second?


.

Edited by Just-Thinking-51, 31 December 2016 - 04:30 AM.


#29 PVD

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Posted 31 December 2016 - 10:17 AM

I helped a friend  with mobility limitations a few times by accompanying him on a short cruise. The ship had some rooms setup with some features that made the room easier to use (no lip to enter shower, rails and fold down bench, slightly wider doors) but not wheelchair toilet and sink. The group of rooms were located near an elevator bank. It worked out pretty well. I realize the space on a railcar is not comparable to a ship, but I like the fact that they tried.






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