Jump to content




Photo

New 737-900


  • Please log in to reply
54 replies to this topic

#41 B757Guy

B757Guy

    Train Attendant

  • Training
  • Pip
  • 47 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 06 November 2016 - 12:18 PM

I fly the 757/767, and can say, we don't rely on a sextant/celestial navigation anymore. :)


I'm an airline pilot with a major US based carrier, and avid lover of trains since the very early days of Amtrak. I fondly recall GG1's zipping along the NEC, and sleeping in a slumbercoach on the Montrealer as a kid. I miss the old heritage cars, the GG1 and the original Budd Metroliners. The new equipment today simply doesn't have the same personality and elegance...


#42 railiner

railiner

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,066 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queens, NY
  • Interests:All public transportation....land, sea, and air

Posted 09 November 2016 - 07:20 PM

Okay....but I thought those windows might be useful in congested airspace to increase visibility of other traffic. So I guess the answer is no, if crews find them annoying and cover them up...
metroblue?

okay on the blue!

#43 jis

jis

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,614 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
  • Interests:Trains, Planes and Travel

Posted 10 November 2016 - 04:30 PM

It is TCAS that can keep much better lookout than any human in congested airspace these days anyway.



#44 Devil's Advocate

Devil's Advocate

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,932 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Америка
  • Interests:Travel by Planes, Trains, and Automobiles

Posted 10 November 2016 - 04:38 PM

If TCAS is alerting then something is seriously wrong with the flight plan, navigation systems, and/or ATC.  TCAS is literally the last line of defense when it comes to collision avoidance.


We've got provisions and lots of beer. The key word is survival on the new frontier. 


#45 bmjhagen9426

bmjhagen9426

    OBS Chief

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 478 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Klamath Falls, Oregon
  • Interests:Computers, riding trains/travel, watching movies/sporting events, listening to music/speeches/talk radio, reading

Posted 10 November 2016 - 04:45 PM

But when the TCAS instruction is not followed, a mid-air collision is possible (much like what happened in the Uberlingen incident between BTC2937 and DHX611)


Just a 23 year old college student who likes to travel by train.
Trains taken (US): Coast Starlight, San Joaquins, Empire Builder, Southwest Chief, Hoosier State, SP4449 excursion 2015
Commuter/Transit Rail (US): Metra, TriMet, SoundTransit, Muni, LA MetroRail
Trains/Transit taken (Outside US and Canada): KNR, SMSC, SMRT, IRTC, DJET, DX LINE, EVERLINE, HUMETRO, METRO9
Ambus trips: BFD-LAX, EMY-SFC
Current Amtrak mileage: 17251 miles plus 130 Ambus miles

#46 jis

jis

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,614 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
  • Interests:Trains, Planes and Travel

Posted 10 November 2016 - 04:50 PM

But when the TCAS instruction is not followed, a mid-air collision is possible (much like what happened in the Uberlingen incident between BTC2937 and DHX611)

Of course. Also when the plane handling instructions are not followed a plane can crash. So what is your point? :P


Edited by jis, 10 November 2016 - 04:50 PM.


#47 railiner

railiner

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,066 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queens, NY
  • Interests:All public transportation....land, sea, and air

Posted 16 November 2016 - 10:44 PM

It is TCAS that can keep much better lookout than any human in congested airspace these days anyway.

That's true....might as well not have any windows (or human pilots, either, right?)....


metroblue?

okay on the blue!

#48 jis

jis

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,614 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
  • Interests:Trains, Planes and Travel

Posted 16 November 2016 - 11:19 PM

It is TCAS that can keep much better lookout than any human in congested airspace these days anyway.

That's true....might as well not have any windows (or human pilots, either, right?)....
Huh? Being melodramatic are we? ;)

#49 railiner

railiner

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,066 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queens, NY
  • Interests:All public transportation....land, sea, and air

Posted 17 November 2016 - 05:48 AM

:)
metroblue?

okay on the blue!

#50 Hotblack Desiato

Hotblack Desiato

    Lead Service Attendant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 110 posts

Posted 18 November 2016 - 10:28 AM

737s had the eybrow windows until the model 737-600 AFAIR. Starting from 737-700s those were gone.

 

The eyebrow windows were removed in 2005, about 8 years after the 737NG entered service.  I think most of the NGs were probably retrofitted to remove them.



#51 Devil's Advocate

Devil's Advocate

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,932 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Америка
  • Interests:Travel by Planes, Trains, and Automobiles

Posted 18 November 2016 - 11:14 AM

 

737s had the eybrow windows until the model 737-600 AFAIR. Starting from 737-700s those were gone.

 

The eyebrow windows were removed in 2005, about 8 years after the 737NG entered service.  I think most of the NGs were probably retrofitted to remove them.

 

 

I remember reading that 737 aircraft delivered with eyebrow windows had never been certified for use without them and thus were ineligible to have them structurally removed after delivery.  However, it's quite possible that a third party vendor managed to receive approval for removable non-structural plugs or filters for blocking excessive sunlight that could interfere with interior visibility.


We've got provisions and lots of beer. The key word is survival on the new frontier. 


#52 Hotblack Desiato

Hotblack Desiato

    Lead Service Attendant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 110 posts

Posted 18 November 2016 - 05:37 PM

Did some research.  It was a plug, not an actual removal of the structure on planes built with them.  Based on a press release from 2005 when the removal of the eyebrow was announced, the plug was developed by Boeing itself.



#53 railiner

railiner

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,066 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queens, NY
  • Interests:All public transportation....land, sea, and air

Posted 20 November 2016 - 12:28 AM

What about the DC-9's and its successor's, the MD-80's,90's and B-717's...IIRC, they had 'em, too...were they later discontinued and/or plugged?

Edited by railiner, 20 November 2016 - 10:46 AM.

metroblue?

okay on the blue!

#54 Ryan

Ryan

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,395 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:OTN
  • Interests:a fact checker combined with a ferret

Posted 20 November 2016 - 02:35 PM

The MD-80(?) that I flew on yesterday still had them.
Posted Image

Disclaimer: Any images or links you see in my post may in fact be invasive advertising or even fraudulent phishing attacks silently injected into my post by our spam based hosting service. If anything looks suspicious or inappropriate or you have any doubt whatsoever then do not click any links (particularly those appearing in green and/or with a double underline) or interact with the spam in any way. You may also want to consider using ad-blocking plugins such as Adblock Plus and/or Ghostery)to help reduce the number and severity of advertising scams directed at you.

#55 saxman

saxman

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,333 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Orleans
  • Interests:Trains, planes, maps, and music

Posted 21 November 2016 - 10:33 AM

What about the DC-9's and its successor's, the MD-80's,90's and B-717's...IIRC, they had 'em, too...were they later discontinued and/or plugged?

 

MD-80's, 90's, do have the windows. The 717's seem to be a mixed bag. There's some Hawaiian Airlines 717's with the eyebrow windows. The Delta 717's (ex AirTran) don't have them. 


Amtrak Miles: 203,395 (as of 9/21/16)




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users