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And Another '737 Crossing The Pond


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#1 NS VIA Fan

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 04:01 AM

WestJet began daily 737-700 service between St. John's, Newfoundland and London Gatwick last evening (May 7)...taking 4 1/2 hrs to cross:

http://flightaware.c...0205Z/CYYT/EGKK

This is in addition to their Dublin flight plus add in the Air Canada A319 to Heathrow and it gives St John's 3 daily transatlantic flights. Not bad for a city of 200,000!

Edited by NS VIA Fan, 08 May 2016 - 10:00 AM.


#2 caravanman

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 04:53 AM

Thanks for posting this info.

As I get older, the 8 hours, give or take, to fly from London to New York gets a bit tiresome, so a shorter transatantic flight time would be welcome.

A random comparison of dates seems to indicate not a big saving on fares against the big airlines that fly direct to NYC from London, probably save more by being flexible with travel dates.

Just noticed that this part of Canada is an island, so probably not too convenient for onward travel into Canada and USA ?

 

Ed.   :cool:


Edited by caravanman, 08 May 2016 - 05:04 AM.


#3 NS VIA Fan

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 06:18 AM

Just noticed that this part of Canada is an island, so probably not too convenient for onward travel into Canada and USA ?
 
Ed.   :cool:


The railway across Newfoundland is gone but there's a cross-island bus that connects with the Marine Atlantic ferry....that connects to another bus in Nova Scotia....which eventually connects to VIA’s Ocean.

I've crossed Newfoundland by car.....exploring the abandoned narrow-gauge railway:

http://discuss.amtra...ndland-railway/

#4 caravanman

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 08:30 AM

Thanks for the link to your trip report, very interesting.

Certainly would make for a different way to reach North America... Probably best done in summertime. I will look into those transport options to reach The Ocean train!

 

Thanks again,

 

Ed.  :cool:



#5 MARC Rider

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 05:07 PM

According to Google Maps,  From St. Johns to Baltimore is a 6 hour flight (involving a change of planes in Toronto) or 37 hours of driving (3,005 km), including a 9 hour ferry crossing and a border crossing.  Plus getting to drive right through New York City.

 

(By the way, the drive from Baltimore to LA is 39 hours, which gives you an idea of how far St. Johns is from the main cities of the North American East coast.  Of course, you don't have to take a ferry to drive from Baltimore to LA.)



#6 DetroitTed

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 05:29 PM

Great news!!  I've been looking at taking the Air Canada flight for years and I'm very pleased that there's now another option.  Yes, I do live in Phoenix, but Newfoundland is a very special place that I love visiting ( my grandmother was from Coley's Point which is near Bay Roberts which is 50 or so miles outside of St. John's).  When I'm forced to move there if the Apocalypse happens and we elect Der Donald, it's good to know there's multiple ways to get to England.



#7 NS VIA Fan

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 05:42 PM

BWI-YYT (St. John’s) is 1300 miles 'as the plane flies'

BWI-LAX is 2300 miles

Up until a month ago you could fly nonstop from Newark to St John's on United in 3 hrs. It now requires a connection in Halifax.

#8 FrensicPic

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 08:23 PM

I remember when 737s were strictly "short-hop"...remember California's PSA?

I learned otherwise when I did an LAX > BOS non-stop on a 737 a while back!


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#9 jis

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Posted 08 May 2016 - 10:35 PM

I did Stuttgart to Newark on a Privatair 737 BBJ flying with a Lufthansa flight number sometime around 2007 IIRC. So 737s have been flying across the pond for a while now.

#10 Devil's Advocate

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 11:19 AM

I did Stuttgart to Newark on a Privatair 737 BBJ flying with a Lufthansa flight number sometime around 2007 IIRC. So 737s have been flying across the pond for a while now.


Sounds about right. I remember scheduled 737 services over the Atlantic was big news in the airliner community about a decade ago. My prior experience with CBSA and ACSTA has done enough to put me off unnecessary Canadian connections in the future. Luckily for me the US is home to the world's largest airline market, with about a dozen significant gateways with scheduled services to nearly every part of the globe, so it's hard to imagine a situation where connecting in Canada would be much of a benefit anyhow.  I can understand the desire to shorten segment lengths but being stuck with a thin service barebones connecting point would seem to defeat the purpose of making the trip simpler and easier.  Witnessing Southwest Airlines initiate scheduled overwater flights to international destinations in own-mental aircraft was the final domino for me. Now I feel like I've seen everything.   :blink:  :o


Edited by Devil's Advocate, 09 May 2016 - 01:45 PM.

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#11 PRR 60

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 12:42 PM

British Airways operates a flight between JFK and London City (LCY) using an Airbus A318 configured with 37 Club World seats - one and one.  That is pretty much pushing the range envelope for that model aircraft (similar to a 737), to the point that westbound bucking the headwinds makes a fuel stop in Shannon, Ireland. 



#12 fairviewroad

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 01:22 PM


Just noticed that this part of Canada is an island, so probably not too convenient for onward travel into Canada and USA ?

 

 

 

Correct, as others have noted, not terribly convenient for onward travel, though a spectacular destination in its own right.

 

Another option for a shorter TATL hop would be London to Halifax (YHZ) on an Air Canada 767. It's roughly 90 minutes shorter than LON-NYC, and there are plenty more onward flights to the US/Canada from YHZ than from St. John's (plus there's USA customs pre-clearance in Halifax).

 

 

-------

 

On the topic of 737's crossing the ocean, there's a WestJet flight from Glasgow to Halifax that uses a 737.



#13 jis

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 02:07 PM

British Airways operates a flight between JFK and London City (LCY) using an Airbus A318 configured with 37 Club World seats - one and one.  That is pretty much pushing the range envelope for that model aircraft (similar to a 737), to the point that westbound bucking the headwinds makes a fuel stop in Shannon, Ireland. 

Actually it is a bit more complicated. The core problem is that on most days it would be able to make it across if the LCY runway was long enough for it to take off with max weight. But alas it is not. Hence the regular stop at Shannon.

 

Because it is a J only configuration, the payload it carries is quite a bit less than what a fully two or three class configured plane would. Actually it is even more sparsely furnished than the Privatair 737 that was also all J was furnished that I flew in from Stuttgart to EWR, and that had no problem making it with its additional tank in the rear hold area or something like that; so even less payload.



#14 railiner

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 02:56 PM

I cannot see the logic of someone choosing to go from New York to London, or similar, by "puddle-jumping" their way across the Atlantic to "minimize their segment time"....

If doing it for a lark, or just for the experience, fine.....but if doing it to make their journey more tolerable....well....I can't see it.   Each change of aircraft, takeoff, and landing, generate their own modicum of stress for some traveler's....it would be better in the long run, to just, well....make the long run....that is go nonstop.


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#15 NS VIA Fan

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 03:29 PM

If doing it for a lark, or just for the experience, fine.....


I did it the first year Air Canada started sending the A319s to Heathrow from St John’s......and as you say I did it 'for a lark' just to experience crossing on a narrow body twin as I could just as easily have taken a ‘767 from Halifax.

#16 jis

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 03:57 PM

Of late, for just going to Europe, I have crossed the Atlantic more often on a narrow body twin (757) than on anything else, until finally this year United started upgrading everything (except the truly secondary cities) to 767, 777 and 787. Of course crossing the Atlantic for going to Asia Israel and India) has always been on 777s, 747s or 380s.

 

The only time I did 737 was on that trip to and from Stuttgart from/to Newark. That flight does not exist anymore, and instead for a while there was a 757 to Stuttgart. I don't know if it is still there.



#17 tp49

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 12:23 PM

 

British Airways operates a flight between JFK and London City (LCY) using an Airbus A318 configured with 37 Club World seats - one and one.  That is pretty much pushing the range envelope for that model aircraft (similar to a 737), to the point that westbound bucking the headwinds makes a fuel stop in Shannon, Ireland. 

Actually it is a bit more complicated. The core problem is that on most days it would be able to make it across if the LCY runway was long enough for it to take off with max weight. But alas it is not. Hence the regular stop at Shannon.

 

Because it is a J only configuration, the payload it carries is quite a bit less than what a fully two or three class configured plane would. Actually it is even more sparsely furnished than the Privatair 737 that was also all J was furnished that I flew in from Stuttgart to EWR, and that had no problem making it with its additional tank in the rear hold area or something like that; so even less payload.

 

I also thought that this particular BA flight uses the stop in Shannon to have the passengers clear US Customs and Immigration there and allow the plane to land at JFK as a domestic flight thus avoiding the hell that is customs at JFK.



#18 jis

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 12:42 PM

Yes, that is the incidental additional advantage. Since they had to stop somewhere to pick up enough fuel to make it to New York, they might as well make it worth the while for their customers while they are at it.



#19 railiner

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 06:40 PM

A throwback to the busy days at Gander, eh? 😊
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#20 Devil's Advocate

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 07:07 PM

Yes, that is the incidental additional advantage. Since they had to stop somewhere to pick up enough fuel to make it to New York, they might as well make it worth the while for their customers while they are at it.

 

Does it actually help?  I've read a lot of negative reviews about how preclearance sounds great at first but can often move even slower than a conventional clearance line and usually dumps you into a sterile holding pen with little or nothing to see or do until boarding.  I've also read how preclearance often allows one person's random CBP problem to hold up everyone traveling on the same aircraft so they can try to sort it out before departure.  I've only had one preclearance entry myself, and honestly didn't think it was that bad, but in general I tend to avoid them based on the comments of others.


Edited by Devil's Advocate, 10 May 2016 - 08:59 PM.

I used to be with ‘it,’ but then they changed what ‘it’ was. Now what I’m with isn’t ‘it,’ and what’s ‘it’ seems weird and scary.





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