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Crossings On High Speed Lines


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#1 CSXfoamer1997

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 11:51 AM

The highest speed for crossings in the U.S. is 125 MPH. If the speed is above 125, then crossings aren't allowed on that section of line. However, what's the highest speed limit for railroad crossings (aka level crossings) in other countries, such as Europe, Russia, Japan, and China?

 

And, even with safety features, why is there such a speed limit for railroad crossings? And why won't crossings in the U.S. use gates like the ones in the UK?



#2 CCC1007

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 11:53 AM

The highest speed for crossings in the U.S. is 125 MPH. If the speed is above 125, then crossings aren't allowed on that section of line. However, what's the highest speed limit for railroad crossings (aka level crossings) in other countries, such as Europe, Russia, Japan, and China?
 
And, even with safety features, why is there such a speed limit for railroad crossings? And why won't crossings in the U.S. use gates like the ones in the UK?

Could you please cite your source for the 125MPH crossing?

#3 crescent-zephyr

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 12:27 PM

For all practical purposes it's 110 in the USA.  But technically he's right, the FRA max limit is 125 if an "impenetrable barrier" is in place. 

 

Source - https://web.archive....Pages/217.shtml


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#4 CSXfoamer1997

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 12:41 PM

For all practical purposes it's 110 in the USA.  But technically he's right, the FRA max limit is 125 if an "impenetrable barrier" is in place. 

 

Source - https://web.archive....Pages/217.shtml

Right. That was what I meant.

 

Link above, CCC1007.



#5 ScouseAndy

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 01:44 PM

UK its 125mph which except the HS1 line is the max line speed here in the uk. At one point in the 90's the main line between Edinburgh and London was mooted to have the line speed increased to 140mph but the cost of removing all crossings killed this stone dead.



#6 afigg

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 05:11 PM

The highest speed for crossings in the U.S. is 125 MPH. If the speed is above 125, then crossings aren't allowed on that section of line. However, what's the highest speed limit for railroad crossings (aka level crossings) in other countries, such as Europe, Russia, Japan, and China?

Turns out there is a Wikipedia entry under Level Crossing that provide some answers for your question with sections on railroad grade crossings by country and continent.  Some excerpts by country:

 

Japan: "As of 2011, there are in total about 34,000 level crossings in Japan. Many rail lines in urban areas have been changed to viaduct or underground tracks, and the number of level crossings has decreased." and

"However, 111 people is dead by crossing accident in 2010, 218 is dead by accidental or intentional hit at the train car in contrast."

 

Finland: "Finland's state railway system has almost 3000 level crossings, according to TraFi." and "In Finland the maximum speed for trains on the rails with level crossings is 140 km/h."

 

Netherlands: "There are no level crossings where trains routinely run at over 140 km/h.".

 

Norway: "From 1998-2008 the Norwegian rail administration (Jernbaneverket) removed about 1000 level crossings, leaving about 3500 still in use. 160 kilometres per hour (99 mph) is the maximum speed for trains over level crossings."

 

Sweden: "A train speed of 200 km/h is allowed in Sweden over level crossings, if there are gates and an obstacle detection unit."

 

United Kingdom: lengthy entry on the history of crossing and types of crossing barriers. "There are around 6,550 level crossings in the United Kingdom, of which about 1,500 are public highway crossings."

 

Oddly, there are no sections on France or Spain. Open for any experts who want to contribute info on those countries and others in Europe.

 

Mexico: "Mexico has also begun to install US-style crossing signals on some of its KCS de Mexico, Ferromex, & Ferrosur rail lines. Although the majority of rail crossings in Mexico remain with just a crossbuck and unsignalled."

 

Runway crossings: yes, there is a section on airport runway crossings. Several of which have been separated for rather obvious reasons.



#7 Metra Electric Rider

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 02:35 PM

 

 And why won't crossings in the U.S. use gates like the ones in the UK?

 

$$$$ We have a lot more level crossings than the UK and fewer, slower (but much longer) trains.

 

Does this count as a level crossing?

 

20240771669_fe09857126_b.jpg


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#8 neroden

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 11:28 PM

That's known as "street trackage". :-)
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#9 caravanman

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 01:59 PM

Although in the old days, large wooden gates were used in the UK, I think we mostly have the raising and lowering pole barriers now. I was surprised by the number of crossings mentioned above, it seems the majority are on private farm type land.

 

Ed.  :cool:



#10 ScouseAndy

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 03:00 PM

many of the UK crossings dont even have barriers at all. This is my personal favourite crossing in the world which is on the Welsh Highland Railway in Portmadog.

 

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=9ocwomt6-PE



#11 Alice

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 04:34 PM

ScouseAndy, that is not just a wonderful crossing, it would be hard to beat that locomotive!



#12 slasher-fun

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 05:51 AM

Oddly, there are no sections on France or Spain. Open for any experts who want to contribute info on those countries and others in Europe.

 

160 km/h max. in France, 155 km/h max. in Spain.



#13 cirdan

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 07:25 AM

Although in the old days, large wooden gates were used in the UK, I think we mostly have the raising and lowering pole barriers now. I was surprised by the number of crossings mentioned above, it seems the majority are on private farm type land.

 

Ed.   :cool:

 

There are many farm crossings that are private, as in connecting two fields and thus not a public right of way. In some cases they may only be used if phone permission is granted by the dispatcher.

 

Then there are various unoffcial crossings, typiaclly foot ctossings, often not created or legalized by any official document and probably not even listed in any official database or list or maked by any signage, but existing through tradition of usage and often only recognizable through a hole in the fence. Those can be very difficult to remove as the law is on the side of the users if they can prove continuity of unopposed usage.






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