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Longest non-stop bus route


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#1 Groundpounder

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 05:21 AM

This might be hard to find, but what is the longest non-stop bus route in the US? I'd have to believe its no more than 4 hours or so, but I'm sure in some remote areas it could be longer. 



#2 BCL

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 10:09 AM

Depends on what you mean by non-stop.  There would typically be some sort of meal break or relief driver.

 

I know Megabus has direct service between the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles, and that's over 4 hours.  However, the reviews I've read say there's a meal stop at Lost Hills (on I-5).



#3 AmtrakBlue

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 10:52 AM

Depends on what you mean by non-stop.  There would typically be some sort of meal break or relief driver.

 

I know Megabus has direct service between the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles, and that's over 4 hours.  However, the reviews I've read say there's a meal stop at Lost Hills (on I-5).

Plus how far can a bus go before stopping to refuel?  


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#4 CCC1007

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 11:13 AM

I know that charter buses here in Montana travel up to about eight hours with only one break for refreshments and bathrooms, especially for high school sports.

#5 railiner

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 11:52 AM

The most common definition of a "Non-stop" scheduled line bus, is the operation between station-stops....meaning where passengers can embark or disembark....highway rest stops or driver change or refueling stops do not count, if you can't board or leave at those stops.

With that definition, beginning in 1957, Greyhound Lines began running the world's longest non-stop trip....from New York City to Chicago via the newly completed chain of toll roads....the Lincoln Tunnel, the New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Ohio Turnpikes, the Indiana Toll Road, and the Chicago Skyway. It made highway rest stops at around four hour intervals, and it made two driver changes at rest stops, at one it refueled. The relief drivers would come from either Pittsburgh or Cleveland in a Company car to the rest stop, and the relieved driver would bring the car back to the terminal.

The trip from end to end took just sixteen hours aboard a Scenicruiser, matching the time of The Broadway and The Century. Everyone boarding at the end points had to travel the whole distance.


Nowadays, the longest nonstopfrom NYC is to Cleveland.
The fuel range of some buses now is over 1200 miles.
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#6 BCL

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 12:38 PM

Nowadays, the longest nonstopfrom NYC is to Cleveland.
The fuel range of some buses now is over 1200 miles.

 

I was thinking Megabus since a lot of their business model is to do point to point transportation compared to Greyhound's network model.  I saw they had Memphis to Chicago.

 

As for the longest range, it wouldn't really be that difficult by just carrying more fuel, but that only makes sense up to a point.  More weight means inefficiency up to the point where the use of fuel lightens the vehicle.  I don't think it would appreciably reduce storage space.  I do recall reading that a Greyhound Supercruiser (not sure what version) could go Seattle to Miami without refueling.



#7 railiner

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 02:03 PM

Chicago to Memphis is about 70 miles further than New York to Cleveland, according to 'Google'..... :)

 

I can assure you that no standard bus can go from Seattle to Miami without refueling  at least twice.   The largest tanks hold about 235 gallons, and even at a decent 7mpg, would fall short of that distance....

I believe that what you read, might have been referring to the longest distance of a THRU bus, with no change required...Seattle to Miami would be that.... ;) 

 

The term "Supercruiser" was used by Greyhound on its MC-6 model...it carried about 180 gallons of fuel....
 


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