Jump to content




Photo

Annoying Policy with Tripods


  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#1 Evan's Trains

Evan's Trains

    Train Attendant

  • Training
  • Pip
  • 22 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States
  • Interests:Trains and Aviation

Posted 21 October 2015 - 07:53 AM

Hallo, does anybody think Amtrak's policy on no tripods near or on the platform is flat out stupid? Seriosly, las Saturday I was at NLC trying to catch 82 when some idiot Amtrak Policeman yelled at me for filming and caused me screw up my shot, so I was forced to use my iPhone to record. Why does AMtrak prohibit this? I see no way that having a tripod could harm you or someone else. Something that staggers me even more is that how you ARE allowed to do film and video but even a small tripod gets you kicked off the platform. How do you think of this? Should it be removed?



#2 SubwayNut

SubwayNut

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,334 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 21 October 2015 - 08:18 AM

It's a common policy of transportation agencies, tripods can often be large and can cause bottlenecks and create tripping hazards. The MTA in New York bans them and it's a policy I understand. Most transit agencies also prohibit flashes because these can be blinding to train operators.
Check out my website SubwayNut.com decidated to pictures of subway, light rail and railroad stations including nearly 200 that Amtrak stop at!

#3 FrensicPic

FrensicPic

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,978 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CWT
  • Interests:Trains, photography and radio communications...not necessarily in that order.

Posted 21 October 2015 - 10:13 AM

It's a common policy of transportation agencies, tripods can often be large and can cause bottlenecks and create tripping hazards. The MTA in New York bans them and it's a policy I understand. Most transit agencies also prohibit flashes because these can be blinding to train operators.

Exactly. I'm a photographer and have no problem with that policy. Also, may times, a tripod will put you into a (perceived) pro or commercial category which requires a shooting permit from the station authorities.


John...

22,913 miles on the Coast Starlight, Sunset Limited, Texas Eagle, Southwest Chief, Empire Builder and Capitol Limited.

More miles on the Pacific Surfliner, Metrolink, White Pass and Yukon Route, Grand Canyon Railway, Napa Valley Wine Train, Fillmore and Western and private railcars with LARail.com

6489 more miles booked

 

Photos: http://www.flickr.co...rensicpic/sets/<p> 


#4 Ryan

Ryan

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,210 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:OTN
  • Interests:a fact checker combined with a ferret

Posted 21 October 2015 - 11:43 AM

Concur with the others. No issues here.
Posted Image

Disclaimer: Any images or links you see in my post may in fact be invasive advertising or even fraudulent phishing attacks silently injected into my post by our spam based hosting service. If anything looks suspicious or inappropriate or you have any doubt whatsoever then do not click any links (particularly those appearing in green and/or with a double underline) or interact with the spam in any way. You may also want to consider using ad-blocking plugins such as Adblock Plus and/or Ghostery)to help reduce the number and severity of advertising scams directed at you.

#5 jis

jis

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,167 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
  • Interests:Trains, Planes and Travel

Posted 21 October 2015 - 12:20 PM

I also agree. The tripod policy is sound and based on real issues that potentially arise from using tripods. Don;t see anything wrong or stupid about it. And yes, I use all sorts of cameras at train stations and other railroad facilities. I often get the comment that I must be a professional photographer, which I am not. but some of my lenses and cameras may give such an impression. At best I am a Pro-Am but I have never used my photos for anything but pure hobby and no financial gain.



#6 MattW

MattW

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,660 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:East of Atlanta, GA

Posted 21 October 2015 - 06:03 PM

If it's not in the way (like at the end of a platform that isn't part of main pedestrian circulation) then it should be ignored. Anything else is a power trip and rules for the sake of rules.


Forum's official broken record about expanded Georgia passenger service!

#7 RRRick

RRRick

    Conductor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 667 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts
  • Interests:Transportation history,

Posted 21 October 2015 - 08:28 PM

 I also agree with the posters above. I hope you can temper your thoughts a bit and realize  the no tripod rules are reasonable for the safety of all the people. 



#8 FrensicPic

FrensicPic

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,978 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CWT
  • Interests:Trains, photography and radio communications...not necessarily in that order.

Posted 21 October 2015 - 08:39 PM

If it's not in the way (like at the end of a platform that isn't part of main pedestrian circulation) then it should be ignored. Anything else is a power trip and rules for the sake of rules.

What is the line of demarcation between "the end of a platform and isn't part of main pedestrian circulation" and, it not the end of the platform but (still) isn't part of main pedestrian circulation? The rule is for the entire platform... NO line of demarcation (gray area)...allows for more consistency in practice. Pedestrian numbers can and do change with time, even short periods.


John...

22,913 miles on the Coast Starlight, Sunset Limited, Texas Eagle, Southwest Chief, Empire Builder and Capitol Limited.

More miles on the Pacific Surfliner, Metrolink, White Pass and Yukon Route, Grand Canyon Railway, Napa Valley Wine Train, Fillmore and Western and private railcars with LARail.com

6489 more miles booked

 

Photos: http://www.flickr.co...rensicpic/sets/<p> 


#9 PerRock

PerRock

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,609 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ann Arbor, MI
  • Interests:Passenger Rail, Auran Trainz, Traveling, Graphic Design

Posted 21 October 2015 - 09:17 PM

I just read over Amtrak's policy and didn't see anything about Tripoods... However not all of the stations Amtrak serve are own by Amtrak and may have their own policies; NLC is owned by "Union Station Development LLC" (don't know who they are), and would probably follows their rules.

 

That being said, I don't tend to film much at stations so never really looked into it; do most policies specifically state tripods? would a monopod be allowed? I would think that use of a monopod would allow you more stability then hand-holding while filming while also being much less likely to get in the way of things.

 

peter


Given the choice; I fly Amtrak.
 
http://www.amtraktrainz.com

#10 FrensicPic

FrensicPic

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,978 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CWT
  • Interests:Trains, photography and radio communications...not necessarily in that order.

Posted 21 October 2015 - 10:17 PM

I just read over Amtrak's policy and didn't see anything about Tripoods... However not all of the stations Amtrak serve are own by Amtrak and may have their own policies; NLC is owned by "Union Station Development LLC" (don't know who they are), and would probably follows their rules.

 

That being said, I don't tend to film much at stations so never really looked into it; do most policies specifically state tripods? would a monopod be allowed? I would think that use of a monopod would allow you more stability then hand-holding while filming while also being much less likely to get in the way of things.

 

peter

From the Amtrak policy (there's always something buried somewhere)...

 

Section III. Exceptions
3.     Ticketed Passengers on platforms may photograph or video record during the time they are preparing to board or immediately after alighting from a train. Equipment is limited to hand-held devices. Such photography, including equipment set-up will be done in a reasonable, safe and timely manner.
 
From LA Metro ...
Photography Guidelines
Only permissible in public areas, proof of fare required in marked fare required areas (station platforms of all rail stations and the Metro Orange Line)
No commercial photography without prior authorization and consent from Metro
Hand held equipment only, no tripods are permitted
No photography inside moving trains for privacy and safety reasons
No flash photography, especially into oncoming transit vehicles (rail or bus)
Photography must not interfere with passenger safety or movement at any time

All organizations/facilities will have their own guidelines that may, or may not agree!


Edited by FrensicPic, 21 October 2015 - 10:18 PM.

John...

22,913 miles on the Coast Starlight, Sunset Limited, Texas Eagle, Southwest Chief, Empire Builder and Capitol Limited.

More miles on the Pacific Surfliner, Metrolink, White Pass and Yukon Route, Grand Canyon Railway, Napa Valley Wine Train, Fillmore and Western and private railcars with LARail.com

6489 more miles booked

 

Photos: http://www.flickr.co...rensicpic/sets/<p> 


#11 Devil's Advocate

Devil's Advocate

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,707 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Paper Street
  • Interests:Travel by Planes, Trains, and Automobiles

Posted 21 October 2015 - 10:54 PM

I've seen tripods on platforms in other countries. Never saw anyone walking into or tripping over them. Probably because they weren't in the way of anyone else. Are Americans uniquely incapable of anticipating basic traffic patterns and avoiding simple obstructions? A more reasonable rule would be something on the lines of "Don't let your photography get in the way of other passengers." Then again you'd be adding a thought based variable to the equation and that doesn't seem to be something our rapidly regressing culture can handle anymore.

If I had a tumor I'd name it Marla.


#12 cirdan

cirdan

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,872 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 October 2015 - 03:29 AM

I've seen tripods on platforms in other countries. Never saw anyone walking into or tripping over them. Probably because they weren't in the way of anyone else. Are Americans uniquely incapable of anticipating basic traffic patterns and avoiding simple obstructions? A more reasonable rule would be something on the lines of "Don't let your photography get in the way of other passengers." Then again you'd be adding a thought based variable to the equation and that doesn't seem to be something our rapidly regressing culture can handle anymore.


Many countries have policies banning tripods. It may be that these are not being properly enforced, or that the security people hadn't noticed or had better things to do. In Spain once I was told by a policemen to put away my tripod. In some countries you can actually even get a permit to use a tripod. I think you have to apply for it in writing beforehand and sign a form so basically they know who you are and you agree to certain conditions, for example not setting up the tripod in areas with passenger circulation.

#13 jis

jis

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,167 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Space Coast, Florida, Area code 3-2-1
  • Interests:Trains, Planes and Travel

Posted 22 October 2015 - 08:37 AM

You can even get a permit from Amtrak or NJT to use such. But you have to do so claiming to be a professional photographer and then everything else that goes with that kicks in.

 

OTOH, fortunately a lot of choice locations for railroad photography are not on any railroad property, and hence you can use tripods to your heart's content provided you stay on public land and do not obstruct any other normal public function.



#14 flying_babyb

flying_babyb

    Service Attendant

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 63 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:wisconsin
  • Interests:travel, teaching, frugal living, pets

Posted 13 March 2016 - 10:29 PM

get a tripod cane! Mines got the 4 cane legs and a tripod ball joint on top. Was a gift a few years ago (i have knee issues)



#15 cirdan

cirdan

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,872 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 14 March 2016 - 05:22 AM

You can even get a permit from Amtrak or NJT to use such. But you have to do so claiming to be a professional photographer and then everything else that goes with that kicks in.

 

OTOH, fortunately a lot of choice locations for railroad photography are not on any railroad property, and hence you can use tripods to your heart's content provided you stay on public land and do not obstruct any other normal public function.

 

I've never had any interactions with Amtrak police concerning this type of thing so can't say how they are, but in the UK I have on several occasions had a policeman walk over to me and ask me some techie nerdy questions about what I was doing and the types of trains we were seeing any about my equipment, probably just to check that i was a legitimate foamer and not some terrorist posing as such. He never once mentioned that I shouldn't be there, but just said to keep behind the yellow lines and not to walk on the track (which I wasn't planning to do anyway) and even said to report to him if there was any trouble.


Edited by cirdan, 14 March 2016 - 05:22 AM.


#16 PerRock

PerRock

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,609 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ann Arbor, MI
  • Interests:Passenger Rail, Auran Trainz, Traveling, Graphic Design

Posted 14 March 2016 - 07:21 AM

 

I just read over Amtrak's policy and didn't see anything about Tripoods... However not all of the stations Amtrak serve are own by Amtrak and may have their own policies; NLC is owned by "Union Station Development LLC" (don't know who they are), and would probably follows their rules.

 

That being said, I don't tend to film much at stations so never really looked into it; do most policies specifically state tripods? would a monopod be allowed? I would think that use of a monopod would allow you more stability then hand-holding while filming while also being much less likely to get in the way of things.

 

peter

From the Amtrak policy (there's always something buried somewhere)...

 

Section III. Exceptions
3.     Ticketed Passengers on platforms may photograph or video record during the time they are preparing to board or immediately after alighting from a train. Equipment is limited to hand-held devices. Such photography, including equipment set-up will be done in a reasonable, safe and timely manner.
 
From LA Metro ...
Photography Guidelines
Only permissible in public areas, proof of fare required in marked fare required areas (station platforms of all rail stations and the Metro Orange Line)
No commercial photography without prior authorization and consent from Metro
Hand held equipment only, no tripods are permitted
No photography inside moving trains for privacy and safety reasons
No flash photography, especially into oncoming transit vehicles (rail or bus)
Photography must not interfere with passenger safety or movement at any time

All organizations/facilities will have their own guidelines that may, or may not agree!

 

I read that as ticketed passengers aren't allowed to use tripods.

 

And the L.A. Metro is not Amtrak...

 

peter


Given the choice; I fly Amtrak.
 
http://www.amtraktrainz.com

#17 Ryan

Ryan

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,210 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:OTN
  • Interests:a fact checker combined with a ferret

Posted 14 March 2016 - 08:48 AM

You have to read the whole policy, the section you quoted from is titled "Exemptions".

An exemption to what, you may ask? The no photography from restricted areas listed earlier. Yes, the platform is considered a restricted area. However, if you have a ticket, you're allowed to take pictures, without a tripod.

So technically your reading is correct - the no tripod rule only applies to passengers. You missed that there was a different rule that said no photography (tripod or not) by non-passengers.
Posted Image

Disclaimer: Any images or links you see in my post may in fact be invasive advertising or even fraudulent phishing attacks silently injected into my post by our spam based hosting service. If anything looks suspicious or inappropriate or you have any doubt whatsoever then do not click any links (particularly those appearing in green and/or with a double underline) or interact with the spam in any way. You may also want to consider using ad-blocking plugins such as Adblock Plus and/or Ghostery)to help reduce the number and severity of advertising scams directed at you.

#18 PerRock

PerRock

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,609 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ann Arbor, MI
  • Interests:Passenger Rail, Auran Trainz, Traveling, Graphic Design

Posted 14 March 2016 - 09:36 AM

I didn't quote the policy, just linked to it.

 

The point I was trying to make is for the regular walk-up railfan trying to do some photography/video, the Amtrak policy does not ban the use of tripods at all. Yes it restricts access to certain areas, but not devices; and as I stated before, certain stations (owned by other entities) may place further restrictions on photography usage & tools.

 

Strictly speaking, yes, you cannot film on a station platform with a tripod, but the rule you would in-fact be breaking is not with the tripod, but with the area your are in; and one could probably make the argument (legally) that the usage of a tripod by a by-stander (railfan) on a platform is not in violation of Amtrak's policies.

 

peter

 

Edit: I haven't seen mention of this. But one of the main reasons for banning the use of tripods on platforms is emergency safety. If there is an emergency and the platform needs to be emptied quickly and person with a tripod may be held up, or get in the way of people trying to exit the platform. On Low-level platforms in particular (and some high-level) one exit/entrance route may be off the end of the platform. If you are there filming with your tripod, you (or your equipment) would be blocking people trying to escape or emergency crews trying to get to the platform.


Edited by PerRock, 14 March 2016 - 09:41 AM.

Given the choice; I fly Amtrak.
 
http://www.amtraktrainz.com

#19 Ryan

Ryan

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,210 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:OTN
  • Interests:a fact checker combined with a ferret

Posted 14 March 2016 - 09:50 AM

"and one could probably make the argument (legally) that the usage of a tripod by a by-stander (railfan) on a platform is not in violation of Amtrak's policies."

No, you couldn't, because as you note in the preceding clause, being a rail fan on the platform without a ticket is a violation of Amtrak's policies.

(well I suppose you could, you can make any argument, but it won't be correct)
Posted Image

Disclaimer: Any images or links you see in my post may in fact be invasive advertising or even fraudulent phishing attacks silently injected into my post by our spam based hosting service. If anything looks suspicious or inappropriate or you have any doubt whatsoever then do not click any links (particularly those appearing in green and/or with a double underline) or interact with the spam in any way. You may also want to consider using ad-blocking plugins such as Adblock Plus and/or Ghostery)to help reduce the number and severity of advertising scams directed at you.

#20 Devil's Advocate

Devil's Advocate

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,707 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Paper Street
  • Interests:Travel by Planes, Trains, and Automobiles

Posted 14 March 2016 - 10:59 AM

I'm glad Amtrak is cracking down on deadly consumer spec tripods. More people die from tripod related deaths than... Hmm.  I actually couldn't find evidence of a single tripod-on-platform related fatality.  Must be something that happens a lot but goes unreported due to the stigma of dying in such an amazingly stupid manner.


Edited by Devil's Advocate, 14 March 2016 - 11:48 AM.

If I had a tumor I'd name it Marla.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users