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New Siemens Charger locomotive.


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#1061 keelhauled

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 08:38 PM

Very much doubt that Cummins would let the customer have that kind of control over the ECU.

We are stuck with technology when what we really want is just stuff that works.


#1062 PerRock

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 09:29 PM

It's just a aerodynamic bolt on nose. All someone would have to do is unbolt the existing "nose" and bolt on the Brightline one. There's a picture somewhere of one of the Brightline engines being built & it has the same front end as the Amtrak ones.

 

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#1063 frequentflyer

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 10:00 PM

It's just a aerodynamic bolt on nose. All someone would have to do is unbolt the existing "nose" and bolt on the Brightline one. There's a picture somewhere of one of the Brightline engines being built & it has the same front end as the Amtrak ones.
 
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The Genesis had a bolt on nose too so that it could be changed quickly after grade accidents.

#1064 jis

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 10:10 PM

Brightline does need that extra HP on an essentially flat track.  Wonder if the HP can be temporarily increased in case of one loco failing ?

It is a short railroad. It would be no problem for a train to complete its trip only slightly behind schedule with a single engine and 400 extra hp won’t make that much of a difference.
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#1065 cpotisch

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 06:02 AM

Brightline does need that extra HP on an essentially flat track.  Wonder if the HP can be temporarily increased in case of one loco failing ?

I feel like an extra 400 hp wouldn't make much difference, especially since it's only pulling 10 single level cars, on a 1 hour 15 minute (eventually 3 hour) route. It runs a little slower, gets to the end of the line, and has the engine fixed/replaced.

 

EDIT: Just saw jis's post. I guess great minds think alike.  ^_^


Edited by cpotisch, 13 June 2018 - 11:57 AM.

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#1066 bcanedy

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 09:10 AM

Does the connection between the Brightline Chargers and passenger cars use a conventional coupler or is it a drawbar making it more time consuming to disconnect?

#1067 jis

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 09:31 AM

Their intention is to keep the consists together when they are out on the road, and make any changes, including loco substitution, only at maintenance facilities, except I guess when things like derailment or collision recovery is involved.


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#1068 chrsjrcj

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 08:51 PM

Does the connection between the Brightline Chargers and passenger cars use a conventional coupler or is it a drawbar making it more time consuming to disconnect?

 

It's the same as between the passenger cars.

 

The only standard coupler is on the front of the loco, hidden behind the nosecone. 



#1069 frequentflyer

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 09:05 PM

 

Does the connection between the Brightline Chargers and passenger cars use a conventional coupler or is it a drawbar making it more time consuming to disconnect?

 

It's the same as between the passenger cars.

 

The only standard coupler is on the front of the loco, hidden behind the nosecone. 

What proprietary couple does Siemens have and why? What are its advantages? 



#1070 chrsjrcj

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 09:08 PM

Brightline went with the semi-permanent sets, not Siemens. 

 

Why Brightline did it? I don't know. But for what it's worth, their Chief Mechanical Officer (Tom Rutkowski) worked on the Acela at one point. That might have played a roll. 

 

Aren't a couple of the new single level cars for California semi-permanently coupled too? 



#1071 brianpmcdonnell17

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 09:11 PM

Brightline went with the semi-permanent sets, not Siemens. 
 
Why Brightline did it? I don't know. But for what it's worth, their Chief Mechanical Officer (Tom Rutkowski) worked on the Acela at one point. That might have played a roll. 
 
Aren't a couple of the new single level cars for California semi-permanently coupled too? 

I don't know the specifications of the California cars, but the Midwest ones are set up so that certain cars are permanently attached to each other.
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#1072 chrsjrcj

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 09:41 PM

Ok, maybe it was the Midwest cars. Could not remember off the top of my head.

#1073 Eric S

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 09:59 PM

IIRC, (many? all? of) the Midwest cars are essentially married pairs, like many rapid transit cars, while the California cars are semi-permanently coupled (6 or 7 car?) trainsets.



#1074 chrsjrcj

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 11:04 PM

IIRC, (many? all? of) the Midwest cars are essentially married pairs, like many rapid transit cars, while the California cars are semi-permanently coupled (6 or 7 car?) trainsets.

 

Right. I found the PowerPoint presentation  http://www.highspeed...esentation.pptx that shows it.

 

So I guess both are getting semi-permanently coupled cars, in some capacity. 



#1075 cirdan

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 06:58 AM

Their intention is to keep the consists together when they are out on the road, and make any changes, including loco substitution, only at maintenance facilities, except I guess when things like derailment or collision recovery is involved.

 

How would that work in practice?

 

Would rescue / wrecking crews be instructed in how to unbolt the permanent couplers? 

 

Or is there even some trick for an easy release?

 

Or would they just saw them through and let the workshop guys work out how to take it from there?

 

At one railroad museum where I volunteered a long long time ago, we were rescuing a steam loco from another museum who had dumped it outseide and basicalyl let it rot.

 

We had a contractor in to lift the engine with a crane or place it on a flatbed truck.

 

Unfortuantely, they were in a hurry, and rather than consult with the museum guys on how best to separate the tender, they just cut through the drawbar without asking, causing a lot of unnecessary damage.



#1076 jis

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 08:24 AM

I suppose they will use the same or similar process to what is specified for Acela Is.
 
Acela IIs are going to be even more interesting since their articulation will be using shared trucks (Jacobs bogies) like the TGVs, but then the French have been running their TGV network for decades now without any problem, including dealing with the full speed (186mph) derailment of a TGV Reseau set near Picardie TGV station on the LGV Nord Europa.caused by the collapse of part of the track into an old unknown trench dating back to the First World War. It apparently turns out that taking a train apart in the filed is such an uncommon thing that the exceptions, which are few and far between, can be handled as needed.
 
In case of Brightline the entire railroad is adjacent to a road and it should not take more that an hour (or at most two) or so to get a mechanical guy to wherever needed on the line from one of the two maintenance sites anyway.

Edited by jis, Today, 06:09 AM.


#1077 jrud

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Posted Today, 03:50 AM

IIRC, (many? all? of) the Midwest cars are essentially married pairs, like many rapid transit cars, while the California cars are semi-permanently coupled (6 or 7 car?) trainsets.

 
Right. I found the PowerPoint presentation  http://www.highspeed...esentation.pptx that shows it.
 
So I guess both are getting semi-permanently coupled cars, in some capacity. 
The seven car California trainsets do have standard couplers for attaching the locomotives. There are also standard couplers on the cab car end. At least this allows locomotives to be standard.

Remembering videos of their cousins the Austrian Railjets, I think the Railjets also swap locomotives relatively easily.

Edited by jrud, Today, 05:12 AM.





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