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Amtrak : Best Kept Secrets


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#41 yarrow

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Posted 25 February 2007 - 11:27 AM

wow, jeriwho, what a good well thought out list of things for comfort and piece of mind on the train.

amtrak miles-115,158
great northern miles-876
northern pacific miles-28
via rail canada kilometers-8,848


#42 haolerider

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 04:27 PM

My list of tips for sleeper car riding:1. Bring a lot of one dollar bills on an overnight trip.
2. Bring a laptop with wireless. (Don't forget portable headphones or earbuds!) As the train approaches towns, especially train stations, a good wireless system may pick up a connection and you can check your e-mail. I was able to do this with my wireless MAC Power Book (only once, on the Capitol Limited, from Washington to Chicago), but my Sony Vaio was never quick enough. Go figure.
2a. More on laptop: Before you leave, go to www.guba.com and download stuff in IPod format on your laptop. Store these files on your laptop to view with Quicktime. You can get older British Comedies and Mysteries, among other things. These are much handier for viewing than toting around a lot of DVDs, though I think taking a couple DVDs with you is also a good idea. You will need a lot of room on your laptop for 30-60 minute programs. Any way that you can convert DVD shows to avi files and store them is handy, but that's too geeky of a discussion for this venue.
4. Pack a cloth tote bag in your suitcase. Load it with your toiletry items and a change of clothes and keep it on top inside your suitcase. When it is shower time, just go down to the luggage hold area in the sleeper car, and extract the tote bag. Hang it up on the back of the door in the shower room and you are ready for the adventure of trying to get a shower in a moving train.
5. There actually are people who sneak aboard at stops and steal from the sleeper carriages. I'm sure it's not frequent, but it happened on one of my first trips. Buy a money belt or travel pouch and keep your cash and credit cards with you, under your clothes, as close to your skin as possible. I also carry a small strapped "purse" (actually a nike runners pouch) that straps on like a fanny pack except the pouch is forward. I wear this on the outside or carry it like a purse. Every morning I put 10-20 dollars into that and use that for tipping, buying beverages, etc. But the majority of my money is out of sight, on my person.
6. Bring a single film of Pepto Bismal tablets or other stomach soother and a tiny container of Advil or other painkiller. If you get sick on the train, you do want to have some relief until you can get to your destination.
7. Dress in layers, and I mean layers: undershirt, top shirt, and over shirt. On a two-day trip, I just pull off the over and under shirts and sleep in my clothes. I get a shower the next day and change, but why bring pajamas? For longer trips I bring cotton running slacks and a heavy cotton tee for night clothes.
8. Bring an IPod or music player. I have a Columbia Sportswear jacket, and it has a lot of hidden pockets. I keep my IPod in one of those and keep the jacket hung up in the tiny closet in the sleeper, with the inside pocket that has the IPod in it furthest from the closet door.
9. Tip the waiters after each meal and the sleeping car attendant at the end of the journey, and always greet them with a smile and kindness. Everybody appreciates pleasant company when you're all cooped up together. Say Please and Thank You.
10. If you have an unlucky trip that results in you having to board a bus to make your connection, don't blame the "little people" on the train. It's not their fault. Travel is like life; it's uncertain. I hate the busses, but they are a risk of Amtrak travel.
11. Keep your cell phone with you. They are a hot commodity for theft and can be quickly resold.
12. Keep your laptop either in the closet or under the chair of your sleeper. Keep the door closed and curtain drawn both when you're in and out of the room. It may seem unfriendly (but not if you say please and thank you to verybody!), but it's the surest way of keeping your presence an unknown. You can alternate the open and closed states when you're in the room, but I just keep the door closed and curtain drawn all the time.
13. I buy those little mini-bottles of Kalhua, brandy, and Bailey's Irish Creme. They are great when added to the coffee on board the train.
14. I collect those mini-containers of shampoo and creme rinse when I stay in hotels. I use these on the train when I am in a sleeper car. They are so portable and such a small luxury! You can get two or three shampoos from one small bottle.
For non-sleeper travel:

For any trip over two hours, Business is always better than coach. It's worth the extra $ in terms of more room, a better chance to relocate once you are on board (like if you want to go from an aisle seat to window seat or vice versa), a quieter journey (usually), better communication with the attendants, and free non-alcoholic beverages. Laptop/Ipod with ear buds a must! But in a pinch, a good John Grisham novel works well.

I was intrigued by your #5 comment - regarding people sneeking onto the train and stealing from the sleeper compartments. I have actually never heard of this and would find it a bit hard to beleive, since so many stops are just 2-3 minutes in duration and at the major stations there is generally some sort of security to stop non-ticket holders from mingling on the platform. Also, if it is a quick stop, there is only one coach and one sleeper door opened and the attendants are there checking tickets. Do you recall what train was involved in this theft and what station? Just curious.

#43 jeriwho

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Posted 27 February 2007 - 08:15 AM

I was intrigued by your #5 comment - regarding people sneeking onto the train and stealing from the sleeper compartments. I have actually never heard of this and would find it a bit hard to beleive, since so many stops are just 2-3 minutes in duration and at the major stations there is generally some sort of security to stop non-ticket holders from mingling on the platform. Also, if it is a quick stop, there is only one coach and one sleeper door opened and the attendants are there checking tickets. Do you recall what train was involved in this theft and what station? Just curious.


It was aboard the Capitol Limited, around Thanksgiving time, in either 2004 or 2005. I have no idea what stations would have been involved. I know it was around one of the mealtimes because I asked the girl if she needed help as I was on my way to the dining car. She said the conductor was coming to help her. I walked up the hallway on the deluxe side (Rooms A, B, C, D, etc) of the car and came around the corner where the coffee urn is kept, with the water and juice, and ran into the conductor and told him that she was waiting for him. He was really surprised, and he asked me to come with him. I did, and she was gone. He told me that people do this, get on board the train at station stops to steal, and he was going to go find her. That's all I know.

#44 wintersummer

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 06:55 PM

Jeriwho - thanks for this list! I'll be taking my first train trip in August and need all the help I can get. Board members have been helping a lot. I'd already started a list for myself, but your list helped me add a few more things. Thanks so much!

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 05:00 PM

My list of tips for sleeper car riding:1. Bring a lot of one dollar bills on an overnight trip.
2. Bring a laptop with wireless. (Don't forget portable headphones or earbuds!) As the train approaches towns, especially train stations, a good wireless system may pick up a connection and you can check your e-mail. I was able to do this with my wireless MAC Power Book (only once, on the Capitol Limited, from Washington to Chicago), but my Sony Vaio was never quick enough. Go figure.
2a. More on laptop: Before you leave, go to www.guba.com and download stuff in IPod format on your laptop. Store these files on your laptop to view with Quicktime. You can get older British Comedies and Mysteries, among other things. These are much handier for viewing than toting around a lot of DVDs, though I think taking a couple DVDs with you is also a good idea. You will need a lot of room on your laptop for 30-60 minute programs. Any way that you can convert DVD shows to avi files and store them is handy, but that's too geeky of a discussion for this venue.
4. Pack a cloth tote bag in your suitcase. Load it with your toiletry items and a change of clothes and keep it on top inside your suitcase. When it is shower time, just go down to the luggage hold area in the sleeper car, and extract the tote bag. Hang it up on the back of the door in the shower room and you are ready for the adventure of trying to get a shower in a moving train.
5. There actually are people who sneak aboard at stops and steal from the sleeper carriages. I'm sure it's not frequent, but it happened on one of my first trips. Buy a money belt or travel pouch and keep your cash and credit cards with you, under your clothes, as close to your skin as possible. I also carry a small strapped "purse" (actually a nike runners pouch) that straps on like a fanny pack except the pouch is forward. I wear this on the outside or carry it like a purse. Every morning I put 10-20 dollars into that and use that for tipping, buying beverages, etc. But the majority of my money is out of sight, on my person.
6. Bring a single film of Pepto Bismal tablets or other stomach soother and a tiny container of Advil or other painkiller. If you get sick on the train, you do want to have some relief until you can get to your destination.
7. Dress in layers, and I mean layers: undershirt, top shirt, and over shirt. On a two-day trip, I just pull off the over and under shirts and sleep in my clothes. I get a shower the next day and change, but why bring pajamas? For longer trips I bring cotton running slacks and a heavy cotton tee for night clothes.
8. Bring an IPod or music player. I have a Columbia Sportswear jacket, and it has a lot of hidden pockets. I keep my IPod in one of those and keep the jacket hung up in the tiny closet in the sleeper, with the inside pocket that has the IPod in it furthest from the closet door.
9. Tip the waiters after each meal and the sleeping car attendant at the end of the journey, and always greet them with a smile and kindness. Everybody appreciates pleasant company when you're all cooped up together. Say Please and Thank You.
10. If you have an unlucky trip that results in you having to board a bus to make your connection, don't blame the "little people" on the train. It's not their fault. Travel is like life; it's uncertain. I hate the busses, but they are a risk of Amtrak travel.
11. Keep your cell phone with you. They are a hot commodity for theft and can be quickly resold.
12. Keep your laptop either in the closet or under the chair of your sleeper. Keep the door closed and curtain drawn both when you're in and out of the room. It may seem unfriendly (but not if you say please and thank you to verybody!), but it's the surest way of keeping your presence an unknown. You can alternate the open and closed states when you're in the room, but I just keep the door closed and curtain drawn all the time.
13. I buy those little mini-bottles of Kalhua, brandy, and Bailey's Irish Creme. They are great when added to the coffee on board the train.
14. I collect those mini-containers of shampoo and creme rinse when I stay in hotels. I use these on the train when I am in a sleeper car. They are so portable and such a small luxury! You can get two or three shampoos from one small bottle.
For non-sleeper travel:

For any trip over two hours, Business is always better than coach. It's worth the extra $ in terms of more room, a better chance to relocate once you are on board (like if you want to go from an aisle seat to window seat or vice versa), a quieter journey (usually), better communication with the attendants, and free non-alcoholic beverages. Laptop/Ipod with ear buds a must! But in a pinch, a good John Grisham novel works well.

I was intrigued by your #5 comment - regarding people sneeking onto the train and stealing from the sleeper compartments. I have actually never heard of this and would find it a bit hard to beleive, since so many stops are just 2-3 minutes in duration and at the major stations there is generally some sort of security to stop non-ticket holders from mingling on the platform. Also, if it is a quick stop, there is only one coach and one sleeper door opened and the attendants are there checking tickets. Do you recall what train was involved in this theft and what station? Just curious.

It has happened, but it is rare - though these days, for those who find themselves in the "40 car" (transition sleeper/crew dorm which is 1/2 sold to the public), since it is right next to the coaches in the reverse consist format, people do wander in, either intentionally or accidentally. To prevent mishaps, please note that this car's doors come pre-equipped for padlocks. If you bring a very small padlock with you, as crew members do, this is almost always enough to deter anyone from entering your room uninvited.

#46 AlanB

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 10:26 PM

To prevent mishaps, please note that this car's doors come pre-equipped for padlocks. If you bring a very small padlock with you, as crew members do, this is almost always enough to deter anyone from entering your room uninvited.


I would strongly recommend that this is one of those "don't try this at home" suggestions. I can't imagine that Amtrak would allow passengers to lock their own rooms. In fact I strongly suspect that most of those hasps for locking the doors are not Amtrak approved and were put there by crew members.

But the attendant would not be happy to find a room that he/she needs to work locked and preventing them from doing their duties.
Alan,

Take care and take trains!

#47 gswager

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 09:39 PM

And safety, too, in case of accidents or medical emergency.
Entire length in segments- Southwest Chief (LSV-LAX & CHI-LSV), Pacific Surfliner (SLO-LAX & LAX-SAN) & San Joaquin (Oakland stub)
Entire length, end to end- Lake Shore Limited (Boston stub) (11/09), Downeaster (11/09) & Coast Starlight (10/11)
Partial- California Zephyr (SLC-EMY), Hiawatha, Cascades (SEA-PDX) & Acela (BOS-PVD)

#48 john h

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 11:56 AM

And safety, too, in case of accidents or medical emergency.

I was thinking the lock was for when you werent in your room, IO am wondering what kind of medical emergency you maybe thinking of

#49 AlanB

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 12:01 PM

And safety, too, in case of accidents or medical emergency.

I was thinking the lock was for when you werent in your room, IO am wondering what kind of medical emergency you maybe thinking of


Yes, it would be rather hard to pad lock your door on the outside, if one is inside the room. Even harder to unlock it from the inside. :lol:
Alan,

Take care and take trains!

#50 VentureForth

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 11:17 AM

Here's a hint similar to one posted on page one:

When you book a trip that has some back tracking involved, check the schedules. You may have options. For instance, Taking the Carolinian NB to catch the Palmetto SB typically is booked through Wilson, NC. Since your ultimate departure and arrival times won't change, would you like to spend more time in Selma (and save $3) or spend more time sightseeing on the train and change at Rocky Mount? The layover at Selma is 3:11, Wilson is 2:15 and Rocky Mount is 1:37. You can get up to an 1:34 on the train rather than on a platform. If your train is running late, get off at Selma or call Julie and see how late the SB Palmetto is.

That's just one example of backtracking. Play with MULTI-TRIP and see what your differences are.

14,223 Amtrak Miles. Many more to go.
Completed Routes: Capitol Limited, Palmetto
Also Ridden: Carolinian, Crescent, Pacific Surfliner, Piedmont, Southwest Chief, Silver Meteor, Silver Star, Texas Eagle


#51 VentureForth

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 11:36 AM

Here's one more sleeper tip. If you're riding in a roomette by yourself, you may want to consider only having the upper bunk made for sleeping and keep the chairs for sitting. Makes it easier to switch from sleeping to computer work to looking out the window, etc. - especially if you're ADD like me and can never really sleep much on the train and you find yourself getting up at 3 AM to go to the sleeper, back to your room, sit, read, play on laptop, try to sleep some more, etc......

Downside is that the top bunk has such a moment arm from the center of gravity that you get quite a bit of rocking and swaying. But I guess that's why I take the train! Afterwards, I tend to have the 'sea-motion' feeling while lying in my very secure and steady bed at home.

14,223 Amtrak Miles. Many more to go.
Completed Routes: Capitol Limited, Palmetto
Also Ridden: Carolinian, Crescent, Pacific Surfliner, Piedmont, Southwest Chief, Silver Meteor, Silver Star, Texas Eagle


#52 gswager

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 08:48 PM

When making reservation with Amtrak, have the sleeper layout, esp. with Superliner, ready. Then, I call the Amtrak reservation agent to make reservation with roomette. After obtaining the room number, I check on the sleeper layout to make sure it's upper or lower level. Mine was lower level, so I asked her for upper level. As a results, the price as increased about $100! From what I've heard, the price on lower level may be cheaper than upper level which I found out few minutes ago. So, I asked her to swap the prices around the roomettes and behold, I get the cheaper price! :P
Entire length in segments- Southwest Chief (LSV-LAX & CHI-LSV), Pacific Surfliner (SLO-LAX & LAX-SAN) & San Joaquin (Oakland stub)
Entire length, end to end- Lake Shore Limited (Boston stub) (11/09), Downeaster (11/09) & Coast Starlight (10/11)
Partial- California Zephyr (SLC-EMY), Hiawatha, Cascades (SEA-PDX) & Acela (BOS-PVD)

#53 Trogdor

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:49 PM

Do you mean that you got the cheaper price for the upstairs room?
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#54 gswager

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 10:55 PM

Do you mean that you got the cheaper price for the upstairs room?


Let's say price of lower room is $239 and the upper room is $340. There are two upper rooms left. I told her that I didn't know about the price difference between upper and lower. Luckily, she made a change, just a price swap.
Entire length in segments- Southwest Chief (LSV-LAX & CHI-LSV), Pacific Surfliner (SLO-LAX & LAX-SAN) & San Joaquin (Oakland stub)
Entire length, end to end- Lake Shore Limited (Boston stub) (11/09), Downeaster (11/09) & Coast Starlight (10/11)
Partial- California Zephyr (SLC-EMY), Hiawatha, Cascades (SEA-PDX) & Acela (BOS-PVD)

#55 Trogdor

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 08:57 AM

In other words, you got the upstairs room for $239 (using that example).

That is valid.

According to a contact of mine (and I know this forum seems to go back and forth on this detail), prices aren't assigned to specific rooms. What happens is that, when there is only one room left at a particular bucket, that fare gets locked up as soon as someone calls and asks for a price quote. If someone then wants to change rooms, that lower bucket fare is no longer available, since it's already "taken." The agent would have to release the room that is automatically assigned (and therefore, also make that fare bucket available again), and then start over again, picking up the room the passenger wants.

So, as I understand it (using your example), let's say there are two rooms left, rooms 9 (upstairs) and 11 (downstairs). There is one B bucket fare left at $239, and one A bucket left at $340. A passenger calls and wants a room. The agent immediately locks in the room before quoting the price, so that someone else doesn't steal the room in the middle of the transaction. Now the passenger has room 11 at $239. But the passenger decides he wants room 9 instead. Since room 11 is still locked, the B bucket fare is no longer available, so the only way to trade rooms is to pay the A bucket fare. However, if the agent cancels the reservation on room 11, and starts over, and then selects room 9, now that B bucket fare is available again, since there isn't a current reservation using the last fare at that bucket.

It isn't the prettiest way of doing things, but I gather that's the best they can do given Arrow's limitations (or maybe there is some intentional reason for throwing that extra step in there). When people keep getting told that the only way to change rooms right off the bat (i.e. when they're making the reservation, rather than later on when Amtrak may have decided to raise the fares across the board) is to pay a higher fare, it's probably either an agent that doesn't want to be bothered with the extra work, or the agent hasn't been fully trained on how to do that properly. Don't be surprised if it's the latter. I've had many experiences with agents that didn't know how to process my reservation correctly, simply because I was doing something "complicated" (such as trying to get a NARP discount, or trying to use one of those AGR one-class upgrade coupons).

Just because an agent gives you an answer doesn't necessarily mean it's the correct one. In this case (if I'm reading your explanation correctly), the agent actually made the room swap the correct way, and you didn't have to pay a higher fare.
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#56 had8ley

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 02:46 PM

In other words, you got the upstairs room for $239 (using that example).

That is valid.

According to a contact of mine (and I know this forum seems to go back and forth on this detail), prices aren't assigned to specific rooms. What happens is that, when there is only one room left at a particular bucket, that fare gets locked up as soon as someone calls and asks for a price quote. If someone then wants to change rooms, that lower bucket fare is no longer available, since it's already "taken." The agent would have to release the room that is automatically assigned (and therefore, also make that fare bucket available again), and then start over again, picking up the room the passenger wants.

So, as I understand it (using your example), let's say there are two rooms left, rooms 9 (upstairs) and 11 (downstairs). There is one B bucket fare left at $239, and one A bucket left at $340. A passenger calls and wants a room. The agent immediately locks in the room before quoting the price, so that someone else doesn't steal the room in the middle of the transaction. Now the passenger has room 11 at $239. But the passenger decides he wants room 9 instead. Since room 11 is still locked, the B bucket fare is no longer available, so the only way to trade rooms is to pay the A bucket fare. However, if the agent cancels the reservation on room 11, and starts over, and then selects room 9, now that B bucket fare is available again, since there isn't a current reservation using the last fare at that bucket.

It isn't the prettiest way of doing things, but I gather that's the best they can do given Arrow's limitations (or maybe there is some intentional reason for throwing that extra step in there). When people keep getting told that the only way to change rooms right off the bat (i.e. when they're making the reservation, rather than later on when Amtrak may have decided to raise the fares across the board) is to pay a higher fare, it's probably either an agent that doesn't want to be bothered with the extra work, or the agent hasn't been fully trained on how to do that properly. Don't be surprised if it's the latter. I've had many experiences with agents that didn't know how to process my reservation correctly, simply because I was doing something "complicated" (such as trying to get a NARP discount, or trying to use one of those AGR one-class upgrade coupons).

Just because an agent gives you an answer doesn't necessarily mean it's the correct one. In this case (if I'm reading your explanation correctly), the agent actually made the room swap the correct way, and you didn't have to pay a higher fare.


Robert;
I concur with all that you have posted. I'm sure Arrow was dreamt up by an ex-airline official as many of the original Amtrak officials were from airlines. (Who would have given up their job at Eastern Airlines thinking that Amtrak would last 36 years?) Anyway, when the reservation system was first put in you could buy a sleeper from New Orleans to Houston. The computer blocked the room for the entire route of the train thus eliminating any double selling down the road. The main reason I'm posting is because I'm a bedroom E person~ it's right next to everything you need including the stairs to the shower room. I've held on the phone for 30 minutes or better while the agent "sold" bedrooms A through D just to be able to get to E. Been there and done it more than once. And yes, I have been skunked by trying to change rooms; it was one of the few times I was forced to buy a coach ticket but luckily got a room once on board.

#57 MrFSS

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 02:51 PM

I concur with all that you have posted. I'm sure Arrow was dreamt up by an ex-airline official as many of the original Amtrak officials were from airlines. (Who would have given up their job at Eastern Airlines thinking that Amtrak would last 36 years?) Anyway, when the reservation system was first put in you could buy a sleeper from New Orleans to Houston. The computer blocked the room for the entire route of the train thus eliminating any double selling down the road. The main reason I'm posting is because I'm a bedroom E person~ it's right next to everything you need including the stairs to the shower room. I've held on the phone for 30 minutes or better while the agent "sold" bedrooms A through D just to be able to get to E. Been there and done it more than once. And yes, I have been skunked by trying to change rooms; it was one of the few times I was forced to buy a coach ticket but luckily got a room once on board.


Is there an order in which they sell the bedrooms? That is, do they always start with "A" and then "B", etc?

I have "E" on the Chief in February and bought it back in July to get the lowest bucket price, which I did.

Or, perhaps they start with "E" and go toward "A"?

Glad to hear you say you like "E". The diagram shows the beds next to the wall where the stairs are - can there be a noise problem during middle of the night boarding of passengers?

Thanks!

#58 had8ley

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 02:57 PM

I concur with all that you have posted. I'm sure Arrow was dreamt up by an ex-airline official as many of the original Amtrak officials were from airlines. (Who would have given up their job at Eastern Airlines thinking that Amtrak would last 36 years?) Anyway, when the reservation system was first put in you could buy a sleeper from New Orleans to Houston. The computer blocked the room for the entire route of the train thus eliminating any double selling down the road. The main reason I'm posting is because I'm a bedroom E person~ it's right next to everything you need including the stairs to the shower room. I've held on the phone for 30 minutes or better while the agent "sold" bedrooms A through D just to be able to get to E. Been there and done it more than once. And yes, I have been skunked by trying to change rooms; it was one of the few times I was forced to buy a coach ticket but luckily got a room once on board.


Is there an order in which they sell the bedrooms? That is, do they always start with "A" and then "B", etc?

I have "E" on the Chief in February and bought it back in July to get the lowest bucket price, which I did.

Or, perhaps they start with "E" and go toward "A"?

Glad to hear you say you like "E". The diagram shows the beds next to the wall where the stairs are - can there be a noise problem during middle of the night boarding of passengers?

Thanks!


Unfortunately they start with A which is just a tad smaller and next to the door as you well know.

#59 VentureForth

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 02:58 PM

Here's a completely different tip. As AlanB has mentioned so many times, there are buckets for the coach fares. Keep in mind, these buckets are for each segment of travel. This could result in 16 different fares if you have two segments, 64 different fares if there are three segments. If you're booking far enough in advance and you have the patience, map out a few dates on each segment to see if you can get ALL of your segments in the lowest bucket.

14,223 Amtrak Miles. Many more to go.
Completed Routes: Capitol Limited, Palmetto
Also Ridden: Carolinian, Crescent, Pacific Surfliner, Piedmont, Southwest Chief, Silver Meteor, Silver Star, Texas Eagle


#60 AlanB

AlanB

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 03:16 PM



Is there an order in which they sell the bedrooms? That is, do they always start with "A" and then "B", etc?

I have "E" on the Chief in February and bought it back in July to get the lowest bucket price, which I did.

Or, perhaps they start with "E" and go toward "A"?

Glad to hear you say you like "E". The diagram shows the beds next to the wall where the stairs are - can there be a noise problem during middle of the night boarding of passengers?

Thanks!


Unfortunately they start with A which is just a tad smaller and next to the door as you well know.


I can't swear if it's the same on all trains, but in my experience they always start with E and go down from there. Just this past summer on the CZ, by the time I had enough points to book a bedroom, the only two rooms left were the A rooms. And on the Capitol a year ago, I got an E room and both the A & B were empty in my car, and the A was empty in the second car.
Alan,

Take care and take trains!




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