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Travel Insurance? Don't!


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#41 Cho Cho Charlie

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 07:40 AM

Sorry, I'm with the insurance company on this one, no matter how sad of a story this guys tells. Insurance is suppose to cover the unexpected. In this case, it wasn't all that unexpected. Well, it was unexpected to the insurance company because the guy just happened to forget to mention it when he took out a policy that covers (amongst other things) passengers who can't take a trip due to a major injury or death.

Travel insurance does cover truly legitimate claims.


I have to agree with you.

Plus, getting even with the insurance company by throwing a temper tantrum all over the 'net (including right here), isn't going to change the facts either.
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#42 dogbert617

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 08:29 PM

 

I also have wondered about Amtrak being considered a common carrier.  When I was planning a cruise and return from Seattle via Amtrak, I called the insurance company and asked that question.  The lady hemmed and hawed and without conviction said yes, Amtrak is considered a common carrier.  I was uneasy about it, but fortunately, there was no reason to file a claim.


Be careful of any restrictions. I believe you have to arrive the day before the cruise ship departure (no more, no less), or the insurance doesn't cover a missed connection.

 

Wow, that's really ridiculous. For cruise ship insurance you really have to be in the city/town the cruise is departing from, one day before? That's a silly as crap requirement, for insurance. But I'll admit I'm not as knowledgeable on insurance related things, as others probably are. I wonder if Allianz(sp?) has such a requirement, if you're doing the reverse(cruise ship to connecting to Amtrak in Seattle)?

 

Anyway, I don't feel there's much of a point to having insurance, for Amtrak trips. But that's just me. And though I have sometimes bought non-refundable tickets if I wanted to travel cheaply on Amtrak, that one would just be best to buy a refundable ticket on Amtrak just in case they can't travel at the last minute, sans Allianz insurance.



#43 jebr

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 09:15 PM

 

 

I also have wondered about Amtrak being considered a common carrier.  When I was planning a cruise and return from Seattle via Amtrak, I called the insurance company and asked that question.  The lady hemmed and hawed and without conviction said yes, Amtrak is considered a common carrier.  I was uneasy about it, but fortunately, there was no reason to file a claim.


Be careful of any restrictions. I believe you have to arrive the day before the cruise ship departure (no more, no less), or the insurance doesn't cover a missed connection.

 

Wow, that's really ridiculous. For cruise ship insurance you really have to be in the city/town the cruise is departing from, one day before? That's a silly as crap requirement, for insurance. But I'll admit I'm not as knowledgeable on insurance related things, as others probably are. I wonder if Allianz(sp?) has such a requirement, if you're doing the reverse(cruise ship to connecting to Amtrak in Seattle)?

 

Anyway, I don't feel there's much of a point to having insurance, for Amtrak trips. But that's just me. And though I have sometimes bought non-refundable tickets if I wanted to travel cheaply on Amtrak, that one would just be best to buy a refundable ticket on Amtrak just in case they can't travel at the last minute, sans Allianz insurance.

 

 

I imagine that particular restriction is mainly to help reduce the chance of a misconnect creating a very expensive payout. If a misconnect or significant delay causes a hotel room to be missed for a night, that likely would be, at most, a couple hundred dollars. A cruise is often over a thousand dollars.

 

That being said, the normal policy I've seen for a misconnect to another form of transportation requires 12 hours between the two, with some generous policies offering a 6 hour minimum. (That's what I was finding when I was looking for coverage for my Canadian trip, anyways, when I had a same-evening departure out of YVR.) Even with a 6-hour minimum, you'd still be looking at arriving at 9 AM if the boat leaves at 3 PM. (I'm not sure how common it is to have a late evening departure, but from what I've seen/heard is that it's typically an afternoon departure.) A 12-hour minimum would basically require arriving on a red-eye flight to be eligible. I'd guess that, in that case, they'd just write in that you have to be in "the day before" a cruise to ensure there's less confusion and to allow a full overnight in case something goes haywire.



#44 dogbert617

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 09:37 PM

 

 

 

I also have wondered about Amtrak being considered a common carrier.  When I was planning a cruise and return from Seattle via Amtrak, I called the insurance company and asked that question.  The lady hemmed and hawed and without conviction said yes, Amtrak is considered a common carrier.  I was uneasy about it, but fortunately, there was no reason to file a claim.


Be careful of any restrictions. I believe you have to arrive the day before the cruise ship departure (no more, no less), or the insurance doesn't cover a missed connection.

 

Wow, that's really ridiculous. For cruise ship insurance you really have to be in the city/town the cruise is departing from, one day before? That's a silly as crap requirement, for insurance. But I'll admit I'm not as knowledgeable on insurance related things, as others probably are. I wonder if Allianz(sp?) has such a requirement, if you're doing the reverse(cruise ship to connecting to Amtrak in Seattle)?

 

Anyway, I don't feel there's much of a point to having insurance, for Amtrak trips. But that's just me. And though I have sometimes bought non-refundable tickets if I wanted to travel cheaply on Amtrak, that one would just be best to buy a refundable ticket on Amtrak just in case they can't travel at the last minute, sans Allianz insurance.

 

 

I imagine that particular restriction is mainly to help reduce the chance of a misconnect creating a very expensive payout. If a misconnect or significant delay causes a hotel room to be missed for a night, that likely would be, at most, a couple hundred dollars. A cruise is often over a thousand dollars.

 

That being said, the normal policy I've seen for a misconnect to another form of transportation requires 12 hours between the two, with some generous policies offering a 6 hour minimum. (That's what I was finding when I was looking for coverage for my Canadian trip, anyways, when I had a same-evening departure out of YVR.) Even with a 6-hour minimum, you'd still be looking at arriving at 9 AM if the boat leaves at 3 PM. (I'm not sure how common it is to have a late evening departure, but from what I've seen/heard is that it's typically an afternoon departure.) A 12-hour minimum would basically require arriving on a red-eye flight to be eligible. I'd guess that, in that case, they'd just write in that you have to be in "the day before" a cruise to ensure there's less confusion and to allow a full overnight in case something goes haywire.

 

 

Thanks for explaining all this. So I see the norm to expect for such insurance with connections to another form of transportation is 12 hours, and sometimes if you're lucky 6 hours? Is there a way the insurance company verifies that you made it to this city(i.e. Seattle, or wherever else the cruise is departing from) by the usual 6 or 12 hour limit, so that your insurance remains valid in case the cruise ship you've booked cancels at the last minute? Since I could see getting insurance for that, since those are usually thousands of dollars to book.



#45 jebr

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 09:47 PM

In my experience, it's based on the ticketed times for the common carrier you're taking, not the time you actually arrive. This is because part of the insurance is in case your common carrier trip is delayed to such an extent that you miss your onward transportation/journey. (Thus, if your Amtrak train was 24 hours late and you missed your cruise because of that, as long as the original ticketed transfer time met the requirements it'd be up to the insurance company to either pay for onward transportation to meet with the cruise ship, give a refund, or some mix of the two.) I don't know what they'd do if you were driving; my guess is that if you were driving it's on you to make it in time.



#46 dogbert617

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 10:08 PM

In my experience, it's based on the ticketed times for the common carrier you're taking, not the time you actually arrive. This is because part of the insurance is in case your common carrier trip is delayed to such an extent that you miss your onward transportation/journey. (Thus, if your Amtrak train was 24 hours late and you missed your cruise because of that, as long as the original ticketed transfer time met the requirements it'd be up to the insurance company to either pay for onward transportation to meet with the cruise ship, give a refund, or some mix of the two.) I don't know what they'd do if you were driving; my guess is that if you were driving it's on you to make it in time.

Oh, okay. So I see it's mainly based on ticketed times for (say, the Empire Builder west to Seattle) if you rode Amtrak, then did your boat cruise(from say, Seattle). I guess it's safe to assume that insurance would be honored(providing the insurance company doesn't have a loophole that screws you out of a claim) if you got to Seattle one day early, then your boat cruise to Alaska(or British Columbia for all I know, and you had a passport) was scheduled for one day later and by some chance(i.e. internal boat engine issue) it got cancelled at the last minute?

 

I understand this much better because of your posts, so thanks for explaining all of this!


Edited by dogbert617, 16 July 2017 - 10:09 PM.


#47 jebr

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 10:23 PM

I'm honestly not 100% sure how that would be covered or how that limitation would affect that sort of coverage. Typically the "one day early" is moreso to lessen losses because a plane/train/bus is late arriving than it is for the ongoing travel to be cancelled. If it was an engine failure, though, I'd expect the cruise line to offer compensation, with any travel insurance likely being secondary. If the question is whether travel insurance would pay for the sunk cost of the tickets to get to Seattle (or wherever) when onward travel (or the purpose for the trip) is cancelled after getting to Seattle, I honestly have no idea. That'd be best answered by asking the insurance company in writing of some sort (though even then they may find some exclusion to deny it.)



#48 JoeBas

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 10:01 AM

Bought travel insurance for the first time for my upcoming South Padre beach trip.  Of course, I made sure it covered "work reasons" with a notarized letter, because being in the weather business August can tend to get a bit dicey. ;) 



#49 Devil's Advocate

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 10:20 AM

I've purchased trip insurance from time to time, mainly when I'm booking a long haul trip far in advance, but I don't actually expect it to do anything for me when the time comes that I actually need it.  It's mainly there in case things go horribly wrong and someone interrupts my story of woe to tell me I should have bought travel insurance.    :lol:


Edited by Devil's Advocate, 17 July 2017 - 10:24 AM.

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#50 JoeBas

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 04:04 PM

Nice! LOL 

 

I expect it'll do the trick for us, we're just driving, and it's just the rental cost of the beachfront condo, so it's not a PHENOMENAL sum.  But for $89, given the time of the year, it's worth it just for the peace of mind. 



#51 jebr

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 04:10 PM

I've purchased trip insurance from time to time, mainly when I'm booking a long haul trip far in advance, but I don't actually expect it to do anything for me when the time comes that I actually need it.  It's mainly there in case things go horribly wrong and someone interrupts my story of woe to tell me I should have bought travel insurance.    :lol:

 

Then they'll just say you should've bought better travel insurance...as if such a thing exists.  :ph34r:



#52 Cho Cho Charlie

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 04:20 PM

Be careful of any restrictions. I believe you have to arrive the day before the cruise ship departure (no more, no less), or the insurance doesn't cover a missed connection.

Wow, that's really ridiculous. For cruise ship insurance you really have to be in the city/town the cruise is departing from, one day before? That's a silly as crap requirement, for insurance. But I'll admit I'm not as knowledgeable on insurance related things, as others probably are. I wonder if Allianz(sp?) has such a requirement, if you're doing the reverse(cruise ship to connecting to Amtrak in Seattle)?


I don't know if this is part of any particular insurance, but I do know that if you want to use one of the Cruise discounts offered by Amtrak, one of the requirements for those discounts, is that you have to schedule your Amtrak travel to arrive the day before before the departure date of your cruise.

I am only going off topic a bit here, because I think this is the source of that comment.
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#53 SarahZ

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 07:08 PM

DA, I know you asked me this question four years ago, but I missed it.  :lol:

 

Yes, I do read the entire insurance contract. I also read the T&C that come with my credit cards, especially the parts about benefits offered (travel insurance, rental cars, medical coverage, etc).

 

I never used to, but then I worked for an auto insurance company, and I cannot even attempt to tell you how many times per day I had to tell people that either their policy didn't cover something (which sucked) or (my favorite type of call) that their policy would cover something they weren't expecting would be covered.

 

So while I may not memorize every single policy I have, I do give them a cursory glance to see if anything leaps out as weird or stupid. :) Working in insurance helped me with the lingo, similar to learning Spanish and then living in Barcelona, so I can parse policies much quicker than the average bear.


Edited by SarahZ, 17 July 2017 - 07:09 PM.

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