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#1 CHamilton

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 01:17 PM

I'm not sure why there aren't many topics for the West here, so let's start some.

 

Start with the links in Northwest Train Vacations for Families, the official Seattle site, and the city's Points of Interest page. Then feel free to ask, as there are several AUers from the northwest who'll be happy to help.

 

Here are some of my favorite places to take guests, some famous, some not so much.

Outside the city

  • Snoqualmie Falls
  • Woodinville's "Alcohol Row," including Ste. Michelle and Columbia wineries and Red Hook brewery

Edited by CHamilton, 16 February 2013 - 01:57 PM.

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#2 NW cannonball

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:56 AM

I Am Not A Local - but have visited Seattle on average twice yearly for 12 years, frequently via the EB.

 

All the places on CHamilton's list I can recommend (but for the 3 I've missed (chocolate,  wine, and Bruce Lee's grave ) Also see the monuments to Jimi Hendrix various places and other Seattle musicians too numerous to count all of them - like for example Quincy Jones, Kurt Cobain, Eddie Vedder - many more - overall the music scene in Seattle is good.

 

A few more -- but first - local public transit  is OK - King County and wider area [Seattle-Tacoma-Everett-North Bend-various Islands and the East Side of the Olympic Peninsula by ferry - good light rail to airport and south side]

 

Walking - especially in some parts of city center - may be more strenuous than some visitors are used to - especially if they hail from Mid-America or England. Probably the streets near the waterfront are not as steep as some in San Francisco - but for some of us the rise of two or more floors in one city block near the waterfront may be unexpected.

 

Museums - Seattle Art Museum in downtown who recently had the big King Tut show and now (from 2013-02-14 through 2013-05-19) have a visiting "Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Gainsborough" show.

The permanent exhibitions are interesting as are the exhibits at the Asian art  museum.

 

Not exactly a museum, more an activity center with lots of interesting boats and ships on display and close to downtown is Center for Wooden Boats  on the south end of Lake Union, not far from Seattle Center - there are also some interesting old ships moored near here on display - fireboat Duwamish ,  a lightship incongruously named Swiftsure, several others.

 

Hiking, kayaking, bicycling -

 

 

The ID = International District (what other cities might call "Chinatown" ) - including especially Uwajimaya grocery with good takeout near the King Street station  - I've often stocked up on munchies there before the EB EB departs.

 

Oh, and the coffee  is good and plentiful - not just SBUX - but oodles of good local coffee shops wherever one might be - not quite Vienna but (ooh - I hear the locals piling on me for that) but real good.

 

If anyone has  more Seattle favorite places or advice for travellers, please post


Edited by NW cannonball, 19 February 2013 - 03:07 AM.

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#3 manderson

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:25 PM

I'll add a few more possibilities:

Ride a Washington State ferry. They leave from several points in the area, including from the downtown waterfront.

Take an Argosy Cruises tour. Two popular points of interest for visitors are the houseboat communities (think Sleepless in Seattle), and Bill Gates' house. That would be the Seattle Lakes tour.

In Tacoma, south of Seattle, check out the Museum of Glass, which includes a working hot shop where you can hang out as long as you want, watching the artists. You can ride the free Link Light Rail to the museum from the Tacoma Dome station, an easy walk from either Amtrak or the Sounder commuter train.

Edited by manderson, 19 February 2013 - 12:29 PM.


#4 trainman74

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:06 PM

I liked the Underground Tour.

I also enjoyed the Archie McPhee store (didn't buy anything when I was there, but it was still fun to shop) -- it's in a neighborhood well north of downtown, but there are several bus routes that stop at the corner nearby.

#5 JayPea

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 07:00 PM

To add a few more things to do in and around Seattle:

 

The Victoria Clipper offers many possible scenic boat trips.

 

Seattle Aquarium and Woodland Park Zoo for watching and enjoying wildlife.

 

On of my own personal favorites, located on Seattle's waterfront is Ye Olde Curiousity Shoppe.  It offers things you don't often see in many places.  Such as real mummies and shrunken heads, among other things. ;)   The shrunken head collection to me bears a strong resemblance to members of our Congress.  :P   It may not be for everyone, but it certainly appeals to my twisted personality. :giggle:


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#6 JayPea

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 11:07 PM

One other possibility are the Gray Line bus tours.  There are several of them that take in many of the sights in and around Seattle.  When I head to Seattle in June I am taking the Mt. Rainier tour.


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#7 CHamilton

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 12:55 PM

Let's add some new attractions:

  • I mentioned the Chihuly museum at Seattle Center, but here's the link. It's new as of a year or so ago, and it's quite beautiful.
  • The Museum of Flight now has a space shuttle trainer. I haven't been to see it yet, but it's supposed to be interesting.
  • Tacoma now has the LeMay Car Museum. They have some fancy cars, but much of what's on display is the sort of cars that you and I grew up with, which is quite fun.

Amtrak can be better! Tell your local, state and national elected officials to support a more robust rail system. Join NARP and your local rail advocacy organization.
Where you'll find my posts: // All Aboard Washington (websiteFacebook) // Amtrak Unlimited Forum Group (Facebook) // Grow Trains (websiteFacebook, Twitter) // Restore the Pioneer Train (website, Facebook, Twitter) // Save the Seattle Waterfront Streetcar (Again) (websiteFacebook, Twitter) // Transit Riders of Puget Sound (Facebook) // Trains on FB (Facebook) // My Random Twitter Musings @HamiltonChas

#8 jb64

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 09:30 AM

I will arrive in Seattle one evening on the CS and leave the next day on the EB.  Given that short time frame, what itenarary do you all recommend to see the best I can of Seattle.  I am staying at the Hotel 5 which is downtown.

 

Thanks.







#9 manderson

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 07:27 PM

I will arrive in Seattle one evening on the CS and leave the next day on the EB.  Given that short time frame, what itenarary do you all recommend to see the best I can of Seattle.  I am staying at the Hotel 5 which is downtown.

 

Thanks.

So you'll have all morning and about half the afternoon.  I'd suggest taking the monorail to the Seattle Center and going up in the Space Needle.  Then depending on your interests, hit a museum:  Chihuly Glass, Pacific Science Center or Experience Music, all at the Center; or the Seattle Art Museum downtown.  Or just wander around the Public Market (aka Pike Place Market), also downtown.

 

Or if you're like me, and like to do a lot of walking on train layovers, you could skip the museums or Market, and instead walk back to the train station after the Space Needle.  Googlemap directions for walking via Alaskan Way, along the waterfront, and stop for fish and chips at Ivars seafood bar.  Probably two to three miles from the Center to the train station, one way.



#10 jb64

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 08:50 PM

I will arrive in Seattle one evening on the CS and leave the next day on the EB.  Given that short time frame, what itenarary do you all recommend to see the best I can of Seattle.  I am staying at the Hotel 5 which is downtown. 
Thanks.

So you'll have all morning and about half the afternoon.  I'd suggest taking the monorail to the Seattle Center and going up in the Space Needle.  Then depending on your interests, hit a museum:  Chihuly Glass, Pacific Science Center or Experience Music, all at the Center; or the Seattle Art Museum downtown.  Or just wander around the Public Market (aka Pike Place Market), also downtown.
 
Or if you're like me, and like to do a lot of walking on train layovers, you could skip the museums or Market, and instead walk back to the train station after the Space Needle.  Googlemap directions for walking via Alaskan Way, along the waterfront, and stop for fish and chips at Ivars seafood bar.  Probably two to three miles from the Center to the train station, one way.

I would like the walk but I will need to figure out the luggage thing. If I want to see the fish throwing thing, what time should I be at the market?





#11 manderson

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 03:16 PM

I will arrive in Seattle one evening on the CS and leave the next day on the EB.  Given that short time frame, what itenarary do you all recommend to see the best I can of Seattle.  I am staying at the Hotel 5 which is downtown. 
Thanks.

So you'll have all morning and about half the afternoon.  I'd suggest taking the monorail to the Seattle Center and going up in the Space Needle.  Then depending on your interests, hit a museum:  Chihuly Glass, Pacific Science Center or Experience Music, all at the Center; or the Seattle Art Museum downtown.  Or just wander around the Public Market (aka Pike Place Market), also downtown.
 
Or if you're like me, and like to do a lot of walking on train layovers, you could skip the museums or Market, and instead walk back to the train station after the Space Needle.  Googlemap directions for walking via Alaskan Way, along the waterfront, and stop for fish and chips at Ivars seafood bar.  Probably two to three miles from the Center to the train station, one way.

I would like the walk but I will need to figure out the luggage thing. If I want to see the fish throwing thing, what time should I be at the market?

I happened to be downtown this morning, so I swung by and asked them about this.  There's no specific time that's best, except maybe afternoons in general.  You want to be there when it's busy with people buying whole fish -- that's when they toss them to the back to prepare and wrap them up.  Best bet is to buy a whole fish yourself!

 

There are several fish shops at the market.  The one you want is under the big clock, just to the left, behind Rachel the pig.



#12 jb64

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:11 PM

Thanks for the great info





#13 trainman74

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:09 PM

I would like the walk but I will need to figure out the luggage thing.

First try asking your hotel for a late checkout, so that you can just wait to check out until it would be time for you to head to the station for the EB. If that's a no-go, the hotel should still be willing to hold your luggage after you check out.

#14 MrFSS

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:23 PM

Views of the market from a few years ago.

 

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i-vbFn4Rz-XL.jpg

 

i-gXBMVDx-XL.jpg

 

i-FnP5MtW-L.jpg

 

Wonder how the prices compare today?



#15 jb64

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 08:32 PM

That makes me hungry. I will try to get some pics of the current prices and we can compare.





#16 jb64

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 07:59 PM

OK, finally have a little time to update the thread.  We hit the space needle first thing in the morning, then took the monorail downtown and spent the rest of the rainy day at the Public Market, which we absolutely loved.  Hotel 5 was a great hotel, very comfortable, great location and very accomodating.  They held our luggage for us and when we returned to get our luggage, they called a car to take us to the train station.  Here are a couple of pics of the fish for price comparison:

 

https://www.facebook...&type=1

 

https://www.facebook...&type=1

 

Sorry for the links, but couldn't get the pictures to embed.  Used to use Picasaweb, but I get an error message saying that file extension could not be used.


Edited by jb64, 22 April 2013 - 08:02 PM.






#17 BCL

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 06:38 PM

I didn't see that much mention of what to do in the surrounding area.

 

I rather like Woodinville.  They have a variety of wineries and tasting rooms, as well as the Red Hook Brewery.  Last time I was in the area I stopped by Chateau Ste Michelle for the free tour and tasting.  I noticed a limo dropping off people, and I think there are various bus and limo tours of the wineries if you don't feel up to driving.



#18 manderson

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 10:10 AM

From The Seattle Times today:


New to town, revisiting favorite haunts, or just sightseeing in Seattle? Here are 10 of the citys top attractions.


Pike Place Market


This historic, beloved downtown public market has been in business since 1907. Its a year-round farmers market and a visual riot of vegetable, seafood, cheese and flower stalls along with handicrafts and tourist-friendly knickknacks. And, of course, the flying fish. Vendors at Pike Place Fish Market gleefully toss salmon to each other and crack jokes, always drawing a crowd at the fish stall by the markets main entrance.


For less of a crowd, take the stairs to Down Under, a wood-floored maze of small shops beneath the main-level market. And mosey into the shops and stalls across the street from the main market, including what is touted as the original Starbucks (which actually moved here from down the street about five years after its 1971 opening, but retains its vintage look).


Info: The main entrance to Pike Place Market is at First Avenue and Pike Street. The market is open daily. pikeplacemarket.org


Space Needle


This vertical icon of the city is so kitschy its become cool, and it gives a great view of the city from the top. Built for the 1962 Worlds Fair, its 605 feet tall and looks like a spaceship on stilts, towering over Seattle Center (seattlecenter.com), a cultural complex where you could easily spend hours at the Pacific Science Center, Chihuly glass display, food court, theatres or simply watching kids frolic in a giant outdoor fountain.


Get there on the Seattle Center Monorail (another nicely kitschy Worlds Fair legacy, seattlemonorail.com) from Westlake Center in the heart of downtown; it takes just a few minutes.


Info: The Space Needle is open daily, including evenings. Admission starts at $19 (adult) for the elevator ride to the observation deck, 520 feet up. Or get a meal with a view at Skycity Restaurant. spaceneedle.com or 206-905-2200.


Olympic Sculpture Park


World-class sculpture. A walk with wonderful views of the city, harbor and mountains. And its free. How could you not visit the Seattle Art Museums Olympic Sculpture Park?


The outdoor sculpture garden spreads over 9 acres of a seaside bluff north of downtown, transformed from an industrial backwater into the home of artwork such as Alexander Calders Eagle, six tons of red-painted steel that looks like an abstract soaring bird. Paths wander amid sculpture; for a longer, lovely walk, stroll along the 1.2-mile waterfront path in adjoining Myrtle Edwards Park.


Info: The sculpture garden is open year-round from a half-hour before sunrise to a half-hour after sunset. Free. seattleartmuseum.org/visit/osp or 206-654-3100.


Washington State Ferries


Ferries shuttle all around Puget Sound and theyre a key, and the prettiest, part of Washingtons transportation system. You can have a fun, quick and cheap sightseeing boat ride as a walk-on passenger (adult fare is $7.70 round trip) on the Seattle-Bainbridge Island ferry. If its clear, youll even see 14,410-foot Mount Rainier looming to the south on the 35-minute ride. The Mountain, as locals call it, really does exist, although its often shrouded in clouds.


Board the ferry at Pier 52 on the downtown Seattle waterfront, get off at Bainbridge and walk into the friendly little town of Winslow its restaurants, cafes and shops are a 10-minute walk from the ferry landing on the main drag of Winslow Way. Back on the ferry, enjoy the spectacular urban skyline view as you approach downtown Seattle.


Info: wsdot.wa.gov/ferries or 888-808-7977. For Winslow shops, restaurants and more, see bainbridgedowntown.org.


Museum of ­History & Industry


This museum doesnt have the most enticing name (although its known locally as MOHAI, which at least is shorter). But dont miss it. MOHAI reopened in late 2012, with new galleries and multimedia displays, in a new location in Lake Union Park at the north edge of downtown. Its exhibits on life in Seattle and Puget Sound cover everything from the maritime past to cutting-edge culture. (Adult admission is $14.)


Outside in the waterfront park, at the south end of Lake Union, watch boats scud across the lake (or across the parks model-boat pond) and float planes take off.


While there, boat-lovers shouldnt miss the nearby Center for Wooden Boats, with displays, more than 100 historic boats, a wharf, rental boats and free vintage-boat rides on Sundays (first-come, first served). No admission charge.


Info: MOHAI, mohai.org or 206-324-1126. Center for Wooden Boats, cwb.org or 206-382-2628.


Downtown waterfront


Soon the traffic-roaring Alaskan Way Viaduct, which cuts off downtown Seattle from its waterfront, will come tumbling down and be replaced by a tunnel. For now, theres a broad sidewalk along the harborfront with shops, eateries (fish and chips is always a favorite) and wooden piers jutting out into the bay. Stop at the Seattle Aquarium to see what lives in (and beyond) the local waters (adult admission, $19.95). Ride the Seattle Great Wheel, a 175-foot tall Ferris wheel with enclosed gondola-type cabins, for a view from on high of the city, Elliott Bay and the Olympic Mountains to the west (adult ticket $13).


Info: seattlewaterfront.org , seattlegreatwheel.comand seattleaquarium.org


Seattle Art Museum


The perfect place for a rainy day or any day if youd like to see everything from European masters paintings and ancient Asian artwork to Native American carvings and contemporary sculpture. The museum is in the heart of downtown; its gift store and restaurant offer unusual souvenirs and good food. Museum admission is $17 (adult), with free admission on the first Thursday of each month. (Tie it in with the free First Thursday Art Walk each month of art galleries in the nearby historic Pioneer Square district.)


Info: seattleartmuseum.org/ or 206-654-3100. firstthursdayseattle.com


Chinatown International District


Seattles Chinatown is almost as old as the city, emerging in the 1880s. Now also called the International District, its been a cultural hub for Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Filipino and other immigrants. Its packed with Asian restaurants and shops, and home to the Wing Luke Museum that chronicles the life and times of Pacific and Asian Americans in the area ($12.95 adult admission). Join the locals at bubble-tea shops or for dim sum. Get a big taste of local cultures at Uwajimaya, a bustling supermarket of Asian foods and gifts.


Info: cidbia.org, wingluke.org, uwajimaya.com


Ballard Locks


See the essence of the Pacific Northwest at the Ballard Locks, where you can watch salmon and boats from fishing boats and tugs to kayaks and yachts. The locks carry boats up and down, letting them travel between Puget Sound and Seattles freshwater waterways (about 20 feet above sea level). A fish ladder lets salmon swim up past the locks to their freshwater spawning grounds; glass viewing windows let people watch them.


Stroll in the ornamental gardens surrounding the locks (formally known as Hiram M. Chittenden Locks, but called Ballard Locks after the local neighborhood); and listen to outdoor concerts at 2 p.m. on summer weekends, June 1 to Labor Day. No admission; concerts also free.


Info: nws.usace.army.mil (click on Chittenden Locks)


Boeing tour


See Boeings Future of Flight exhibits (and design your own jet digitally) and see jets being made inside the Boeing factory, about 25 miles north of Seattle in Everett. The Boeing plant is the biggest building by volume in the world 472,000,000 cubic feet and holds the production lines for various Boeing jets, including the 787 Dreamliner. Adult admission for the exhibits and 90-minute guided tour is $18. (Children must be at least four feet tall to join the tour.)


Info: futureofflight.org

Edited by manderson, 11 May 2013 - 10:17 AM.


#19 CHamilton

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 11:54 AM

Here are some more things to do in Seattle, including The Washington Banana Museum.

Insider’s Guide to the Seattle Icons You Thought You Knew

 

By the way, if you're looking for unusual things to do and see in the Northwest, check out Harriet Baskas' books. She's made a specialty of finding "curiosities."


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#20 JayPea

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 12:29 AM

Here are some more things to do in Seattle, including The Washington Banana Museum.
Insider’s Guide to the Seattle Icons You Thought You Knew
 
By the way, if you're looking for unusual things to do and see in the Northwest, check out Harriet Baskas' books. She's made a specialty of finding "curiosities."

Great find, Charlie! There are a few of those I plan on taking in while I'm in Seattle next month. These include the duck tour, the Ferris Wheel on the pier, and the boat ride to Blake Island. I can already taste that salmon! :lol: A return visit to Ye Olde Curiousity Shoppe is also on my to-do list.
Amtrak miles traveled: 85410
Pre-Amtrak miles traveled:8478
Bustitution miles traveled:450
States traveled through on Amtrak: 44




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