Quantcast

Jump to content




Photo

Boston North to Boston Back Bay


27 replies to this topic

#1 x-press

x-press

    Lead Service Attendant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 170 posts

Posted 24 June 2007 - 12:00 PM

Greetings:

We're doing a trip to Maine, and on the return we've managed to get the Downeaster into Boston (North Station). The transfer between there and Back Bay Station seems easy enough (MBTA line, I forget the color off the top of my head), but why has Amtrak actually included a TICKET between those stations? I had to check it twice, but there is indeed a ticket from Boston North to Boston Back Bay included in what they sent us. I don't see how it could be used on a subway-like operation . . . ?

Also, if we wanted to get on at Boston South Station with a Back Bay ticket (since it has a food court, first choice of seats, etc), does anyone think conductors would mind?

Thanks in Advance,

JPS

#2 rmgreenesq

rmgreenesq

    OBS Chief

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 433 posts
  • Location:Worcester, MA (WOR)

Posted 24 June 2007 - 01:32 PM

Greetings:

We're doing a trip to Maine, and on the return we've managed to get the Downeaster into Boston (North Station). The transfer between there and Back Bay Station seems easy enough (MBTA line, I forget the color off the top of my head), but why has Amtrak actually included a TICKET between those stations? I had to check it twice, but there is indeed a ticket from Boston North to Boston Back Bay included in what they sent us. I don't see how it could be used on a subway-like operation . . . ?

Also, if we wanted to get on at Boston South Station with a Back Bay ticket (since it has a food court, first choice of seats, etc), does anyone think conductors would mind?

Thanks in Advance,

JPS


The MBTA color you are looking for is Orange. The Orange Line connects North Station to Back Bay. To get from North Station to South Station, you'd need to take the green line and change to the red line at Park Street. You could also hire a cab or if its a nice day, hoof it. Its not that far.


I dont know about the Amtrak Ticket from North Station to Back Bay. It could be that they are collecting your subway fare in advance. I'd try presenting the tickets to the MBTA cashier and see if they let you on the subway. I'd have $2 per person in your pocket just in case....

As to boarding at South Station versus Back Bay, the conductors generally do not pull tickets until after the train clears Boston -128 (the station after Back Bay), so I'm reasonably sure that unless you do something to attract attention to yourself, the conductor will not know where you got on.

The only person that may give you some grief would be the train attendant or AmCop checking tickets as you walk out to the platform. I don't think they would notice or care that you are boarding at South Station with a Back Bay ticket. The stations are one mile apart.

Hope this helps.

Rick
The railway approach to New York is not one to lift the spirits. We disembark in subterranean gloom and trudge along the platform sustained only by an act of faith that New York really is up there above us, and that we haven't all died.

-Michael Palin

#3 PRR 60

PRR 60

    Engineer

  • Forum Manager
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,085 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 June 2007 - 02:17 PM

The Amtrak computer reservation system has no way to price and ticket an itinerary that is not continuous. Even the multi-city option requires each segment to connect directly to the prior segment.

That was not a big deal until the Downeaster came along. The Downester does not connect directly to any other Amtrak train. Pricing a trip from Philadelphia to Portland, ME (POR) would mean PHL to Boston (Back Bay - BBY - or South Station - BOS) and then North Station (BON) to POR. The segment between BOS and BON is open - no train - and the Amtrak system cannot deal with that. So as a work around, Amtrak invented a fictitious route, from Boston Back Bay (BBY) to BON. Now, when you price a trip from PHL to POR you get three segments: PHL-BBY, the imaginary BBY-BON, and BON-POR. There are no open segments so the Amtrak CRS is happy.

When you get you actual tickets you do indeed get a ticket for the fictitious BBY-BON segment. It means nothing and is worth nothing. Amtrak uses that ticket to say a few words about the transfer, but that's it. You still have to find your own way between BBY and BPN at your expense. And, yes, you can use your BBY ticket to and from BOS.

Edited by PRR 60, 25 June 2007 - 06:03 AM.


#4 AlanB

AlanB

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 28,851 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queens, New York

Posted 24 June 2007 - 03:11 PM

The price from anyone of the three Boston stops (South Station, Back Bay, Route 128) to any other stop on the NEC is the same price regardless of which one of the three stops you leave/arrive from. So no one will care at which one of the three you board at, no matter what your ticket actually says.

As for the subway, in addition to the Green line to the Red line to reach South Station, you can also take the Orange line to the Red line too.

Personally if I were carrying/rolling any luggage, I would opt for the Orange to the Red, since they are traditional subways with high level platforms. The Green line is a trolley/light rail operation, so you'll have to haul your bags up the steps. And the Green line trains always seem to be more crowded too.
Alan,

Take care and take trains!

#5 Guest_Kaffy_*

Guest_Kaffy_*
  • Guests

Posted 12 August 2010 - 10:29 PM

I will be taking Amtrak from NYC to Maine. The train from New York City arrives at the Back Bay station in Boston but the train to Maine leaves from North Station. Does wondering how long it would take to take a cab from Back Bay to North Station and about how much it would cost. I am not from Boston so not sure how far apart these stations are.

#6 Guest_guest_*

Guest_guest_*
  • Guests

Posted 12 August 2010 - 11:05 PM

The price from anyone of the three Boston stops (South Station, Back Bay, Route 128) to any other stop on the NEC is the same price regardless of which one of the three stops you leave/arrive from. So no one will care at which one of the three you board at, no matter what your ticket actually says.

As for the subway, in addition to the Green line to the Red line to reach South Station, you can also take the Orange line to the Red line too.

Personally if I were carrying/rolling any luggage, I would opt for the Orange to the Red, since they are traditional subways with high level platforms. The Green line is a trolley/light rail operation, so you'll have to haul your bags up the steps. And the Green line trains always seem to be more crowded too.

With baggage, the Orange to Red alternative is preferable because the subway cars are larger, have more doors and are platform level. Without baggage, I would recommend the Green to Red because at Park Street Station, the transfer is very easy; just down one flight of stairs and you're on the Red Line platform.
The Orange to Red transfer at Downtown Crossing (the former Washington St. station when I was at Harvard many moons ago) involves a fairly long tunnel walk after going up stairs.
But I would definitely board at South Station. It's always better to get on at the terminal location. More time, better seat choice, and so forth.

#7 the_traveler

the_traveler

    Engineer

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,558 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Penthouse Suite - here & there
  • Interests:Planning my next trip

Posted 13 August 2010 - 12:25 AM

I will be taking Amtrak from NYC to Maine. The train from New York City arrives at the Back Bay station in Boston but the train to Maine leaves from North Station. Does wondering how long it would take to take a cab from Back Bay to North Station and about how much it would cost. I am not from Boston so not sure how far apart these stations are.

If you gave a lot of baggage, I would take the NEC train to South Station and then take a cab to North Station. If you have little of no luggage, I would get off at Back Bay.


From the Amtrak platform, go up the stairs, turn right, walk 100 feet, turn right (this is all in the same station) and get on the Orange line of the "T". A few stops later, it stops at North Station!Posted Image
Take it easy .......

Take the train instead!

#8 jis

jis

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,566 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Space Coast, Florida
  • Interests:Trains, Planes and Travel

Posted 13 August 2010 - 06:41 AM

The Orange to Red transfer at Downtown Crossing (the former Washington St. station when I was at Harvard many moons ago) involves a fairly long tunnel walk after going up stairs.

And those many moons ago just to confuse the hapless, the Orange Line station corresponding to the Red Line Washington station, was called Summer-Winter!

#9 had8ley

had8ley

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,111 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  • Interests:"There's nothin' nicer than "dinner In the diner." After 30 plus years of pulling cabooses and pax trains around it's time for someone else to pull me around...

Posted 13 August 2010 - 09:27 AM

The Amtrak computer reservation system has no way to price and ticket an itinerary that is not continuous. Even the multi-city option requires each segment to connect directly to the prior segment.

That was not a big deal until the Downeaster came along. The Downester does not connect directly to any other Amtrak train. Pricing a trip from Philadelphia to Portland, ME (POR) would mean PHL to Boston (Back Bay - BBY - or South Station - BOS) and then North Station (BON) to POR. The segment between BOS and BON is open - no train - and the Amtrak system cannot deal with that. So as a work around, Amtrak invented a fictitious route, from Boston Back Bay (BBY) to BON. Now, when you price a trip from PHL to POR you get three segments: PHL-BBY, the imaginary BBY-BON, and BON-POR. There are no open segments so the Amtrak CRS is happy.

When you get you actual tickets you do indeed get a ticket for the fictitious BBY-BON segment. It means nothing and is worth nothing. Amtrak uses that ticket to say a few words about the transfer, but that's it. You still have to find your own way between BBY and BPN at your expense. And, yes, you can use your BBY ticket to and from BOS.

OK...if Amtrak can print such items as "ID Required On Board" why can't they print on the "dummy" ticket that pax must make their own way between stations ?

#10 AlanB

AlanB

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 28,851 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queens, New York

Posted 13 August 2010 - 12:29 PM


The Amtrak computer reservation system has no way to price and ticket an itinerary that is not continuous. Even the multi-city option requires each segment to connect directly to the prior segment.

That was not a big deal until the Downeaster came along. The Downester does not connect directly to any other Amtrak train. Pricing a trip from Philadelphia to Portland, ME (POR) would mean PHL to Boston (Back Bay - BBY - or South Station - BOS) and then North Station (BON) to POR. The segment between BOS and BON is open - no train - and the Amtrak system cannot deal with that. So as a work around, Amtrak invented a fictitious route, from Boston Back Bay (BBY) to BON. Now, when you price a trip from PHL to POR you get three segments: PHL-BBY, the imaginary BBY-BON, and BON-POR. There are no open segments so the Amtrak CRS is happy.

When you get you actual tickets you do indeed get a ticket for the fictitious BBY-BON segment. It means nothing and is worth nothing. Amtrak uses that ticket to say a few words about the transfer, but that's it. You still have to find your own way between BBY and BPN at your expense. And, yes, you can use your BBY ticket to and from BOS.


OK...if Amtrak can print such items as "ID Required On Board" why can't they print on the "dummy" ticket that pax must make their own way between stations ?


While they don't use the word "dummy" for obvious reasons, the ticket quite clearly states that the ticket is not valid for travel. Additionally the ticket lists your options for getting to/from the south to North station.

So I'm not sure that it could be made all that much clearer.
Alan,

Take care and take trains!

#11 had8ley

had8ley

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,111 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  • Interests:"There's nothin' nicer than "dinner In the diner." After 30 plus years of pulling cabooses and pax trains around it's time for someone else to pull me around...

Posted 13 August 2010 - 12:40 PM



The Amtrak computer reservation system has no way to price and ticket an itinerary that is not continuous. Even the multi-city option requires each segment to connect directly to the prior segment.

That was not a big deal until the Downeaster came along. The Downester does not connect directly to any other Amtrak train. Pricing a trip from Philadelphia to Portland, ME (POR) would mean PHL to Boston (Back Bay - BBY - or South Station - BOS) and then North Station (BON) to POR. The segment between BOS and BON is open - no train - and the Amtrak system cannot deal with that. So as a work around, Amtrak invented a fictitious route, from Boston Back Bay (BBY) to BON. Now, when you price a trip from PHL to POR you get three segments: PHL-BBY, the imaginary BBY-BON, and BON-POR. There are no open segments so the Amtrak CRS is happy.

When you get you actual tickets you do indeed get a ticket for the fictitious BBY-BON segment. It means nothing and is worth nothing. Amtrak uses that ticket to say a few words about the transfer, but that's it. You still have to find your own way between BBY and BPN at your expense. And, yes, you can use your BBY ticket to and from BOS.


OK...if Amtrak can print such items as "ID Required On Board" why can't they print on the "dummy" ticket that pax must make their own way between stations ?


While they don't use the word "dummy" for obvious reasons, the ticket quite clearly states that the ticket is not valid for travel. Additionally the ticket lists your options for getting to/from the south to North station.

So I'm not sure that it could be made all that much clearer.

OOPS ! :help: Last tix I had displayed none of the above except "Not valid for travel.!" Must be AGR again... :blush:

#12 darien-l

darien-l

    Conductor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 584 posts

Posted 13 August 2010 - 12:42 PM

I will be taking Amtrak from NYC to Maine. The train from New York City arrives at the Back Bay station in Boston but the train to Maine leaves from North Station. Does wondering how long it would take to take a cab from Back Bay to North Station and about how much it would cost. I am not from Boston so not sure how far apart these stations are.

Kaffy:

If you are looking to take a cab for the transfer, I suggest you do not get off in Back Bay. It's a smaller station, there's no guarantee of cabs being available, and it's a longer cab ride (about 10 minutes, and it's usually less than 10 from South Station). Instead, go to the end of the line, Boston South Station. I'm pretty sure they will let you stay on the train without paying anything extra.

Alternatively, if you do get off at Back Bay, consider just hopping on a northbound Orange line: http://www.mbta.com/...s/?route=ORANGE It's a very easy transfer on both ends.

#13 p&sr

p&sr

    Conductor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 953 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northern California

Posted 13 August 2010 - 02:50 PM

The Amtrak computer reservation system has no way to price and ticket an itinerary that is not continuous. Even the multi-city option requires each segment to connect directly to the prior segment.

I did a test just now, and got different results.

It will let me book travel from PDX to SEA on Train 14, arriving at 8:45 PM. ($49 coach fare), then transfer (same day) to Train 48 from CHI to NYP, departing at 9:30 PM. ($134 coach fare).

The Website let me get as far as requesting details for payment.

They leave it to the traveller's own devices as to how to connect from Seattle to Chicago in less than one hour (clock time... allowing for time zones, the LSL is already long gone!).

Maybe that's why connections booked through Multi-City are "not necessarily guaranteed"!
P&SR

"Keep 'em Rolling!"

#14 PRR 60

PRR 60

    Engineer

  • Forum Manager
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,085 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 13 August 2010 - 03:09 PM


The Amtrak computer reservation system has no way to price and ticket an itinerary that is not continuous. Even the multi-city option requires each segment to connect directly to the prior segment.

I did a test just now, and got different results.

It will let me book travel from PDX to SEA on Train 14, arriving at 8:45 PM. ($49 coach fare), then transfer (same day) to Train 48 from CHI to NYP, departing at 9:30 PM. ($134 coach fare).

The Website let me get as far as requesting details for payment.

They leave it to the traveller's own devices as to how to connect from Seattle to Chicago in less than one hour (clock time... allowing for time zones, the LSL is already long gone!).

Maybe that's why connections booked through Multi-City are "not necessarily guaranteed"!

The update of the Amtrak web booking system opened up the option of non-continuous, multi-city reservations (my quoted post is from three years ago). Being allowed to book two segments separated by one hour and 1800 miles is pretty amusing.

#15 GG-1

GG-1

    Engineer

  • Forum Manager
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,405 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Las Vegas, NV
  • Interests:PRR GG1 and riding the rails to "see the USA in your Chev".....Train

Posted 13 August 2010 - 06:29 PM

The update of the Amtrak web booking system opened up the option of non-continuous, multi-city reservations (my quoted post is from three years ago). Being allowed to book two segments separated by one hour and 1800 miles is pretty amusing.

Aloha

Scottie could make it. :giggle:

Eric aka GG-1, Aloha, Mahalo = Thanks

Picture Galleries Posted Image

#16 the_traveler

the_traveler

    Engineer

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,558 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Penthouse Suite - here & there
  • Interests:Planning my next trip

Posted 13 August 2010 - 07:35 PM


The update of the Amtrak web booking system opened up the option of non-continuous, multi-city reservations (my quoted post is from three years ago). Being allowed to book two segments separated by one hour and 1800 miles is pretty amusing.

Aloha

Scottie could make it. :giggle:

the_(time)traveler helped!Posted Image
Take it easy .......

Take the train instead!

#17 mp-44

mp-44

    Service Attendant

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 56 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:catlett virginia

Posted 14 August 2010 - 08:46 PM

I did the same trip about three weeks ago and had a return ticket for Back Bay but I got on at South Station Amtrak personel said people do it all the time As for going between stations I found that with baggage a cab worked better about 8 to 10 dollars and it takes about 10 minutes.mp-44.......

#18 had8ley

had8ley

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,111 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  • Interests:"There's nothin' nicer than "dinner In the diner." After 30 plus years of pulling cabooses and pax trains around it's time for someone else to pull me around...

Posted 15 August 2010 - 03:03 PM



The Amtrak computer reservation system has no way to price and ticket an itinerary that is not continuous. Even the multi-city option requires each segment to connect directly to the prior segment.

That was not a big deal until the Downeaster came along. The Downester does not connect directly to any other Amtrak train. Pricing a trip from Philadelphia to Portland, ME (POR) would mean PHL to Boston (Back Bay - BBY - or South Station - BOS) and then North Station (BON) to POR. The segment between BOS and BON is open - no train - and the Amtrak system cannot deal with that. So as a work around, Amtrak invented a fictitious route, from Boston Back Bay (BBY) to BON. Now, when you price a trip from PHL to POR you get three segments: PHL-BBY, the imaginary BBY-BON, and BON-POR. There are no open segments so the Amtrak CRS is happy.

When you get you actual tickets you do indeed get a ticket for the fictitious BBY-BON segment. It means nothing and is worth nothing. Amtrak uses that ticket to say a few words about the transfer, but that's it. You still have to find your own way between BBY and BPN at your expense. And, yes, you can use your BBY ticket to and from BOS.


OK...if Amtrak can print such items as "ID Required On Board" why can't they print on the "dummy" ticket that pax must make their own way between stations ?


While they don't use the word "dummy" for obvious reasons, the ticket quite clearly states that the ticket is not valid for travel. Additionally the ticket lists your options for getting to/from the south to North station.

So I'm not sure that it could be made all that much clearer.

Well Alan it's about as clear as mud IF it's not printed on the tix :lol:

#19 Guest_Kay_*

Guest_Kay_*
  • Guests

Posted 01 January 2012 - 12:24 AM

I am taking Amtrak from Portland, ME to BWI and need to transfer at Boston with 2 kids age 3 and 7. Is the best way to take a cab? How far do we have to travel between the cab and the train? And can I take a cab with a 3 year old and no car seat? Thanks.

#20 amamba

amamba

    Engineer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,805 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Providence

Posted 01 January 2012 - 01:28 PM

I am taking Amtrak from Portland, ME to BWI and need to transfer at Boston with 2 kids age 3 and 7. Is the best way to take a cab? How far do we have to travel between the cab and the train? And can I take a cab with a 3 year old and no car seat? Thanks.


Yes, a cab would be super easy. When you get off at BON (boston north station), turn right when you enter the station. Then when you head out the doors (past the mcdonalds and the dunkin donuts) to the street, turn left to go to the main road. There are generally cabs waiting right there. Tell them you want to go to South Station. Depending on the traffic it could be a 5 minute ride or a 20 minute ride. It's not a very long walk.

Alternatively, you can take the "T" - the subway. When you walk into the station turn LEFT instead of right, go down the steps and out the double doors. When you exit the doors turn RIGHT and you will see the entrance down to the T station straight ahead of you. You do have to exit the actual train station to find the subway entrance at BON. Take the orange line to Back Bay station or take it to Downtown crossing and change to the red line to get to south station.

I am not sure about taking a cab without a car seat, but I would assume that it is OK. People in cities don't carry car seats with them when they go out on errands all the time, right?



Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users